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Category Archives: Studio One


The “QuickStrip” Bass FX Chain

Sometimes when you get inspired, you don’t have time to wait before laying down some tracks. But then you want a compressor, and maybe a bit of dirt for an amp sound, some EQ, and a little doubling for flavor…maybe a touch of funk…and by the time you’ve inserted and tweaked everything, you’ve forgotten what you were going to play. No more! The Bass QuickStrip FX Chain is here to help you dial up a sound in seconds.

 

Rather than go through all the backstory on how it’s done, just download the FX Chain, and reverse-engineer it to your heart’s content. Here are the highlights, along with crucial controls you can customize to make the chain your own.

 

 

Dirt Control: This is the Mix control for the RedLightDist processor, whose settings have been optimized for bass. For more highs, turn up the processor’s High Freq control, or turn down for a bassier growl. This stage has an associated enable/bypass button.

Funk Cutoff, Funk Res, and Funk Mix: These are the essential Autofilter controls for when you want to lay some funk on your bass. Cutoff covers the general range to match your playing, Res is the filter resonance, and because envelope filters are best for bass when placed in the parallel, Mix controls the dry/filter balance. It has an associated enable/bypass switch.

Note that the RedLightDist and Autofilter are fed off a split, so they do parallel processing. This is in addition to the parallel processing done within the processors themselves.

Bass, Mid, and Treble: This “tone stack” for the Bass QuickStrip controls parameters in the Pro EQ. They don’t cover the full boost/cut range, but if you want to get more extreme, be my guest.

Compressor: The compression is optimized for bass, so the single control is a dry/compressed mix, paired with an enable/bypass switch. Any customization would be to taste—for example, a lower Threshold, or higher Ratio, for a more compressed sound. But if you want more variation and the ability to change the compression from light to heavy, another option is to use the settings for the EZ Squeez one-knob compressor, which was the subject of the Friday tip for August 24, 2018.

Doubler: This switch brings in a doubling effect, courtesy of the Analog Delay. It also bumps up the gain a bit using the Mixtool, so that the doubled and dry sounds have the same apparent level.

So download away—and lay down the low.

 

DOWNLOAD THE BASS QUICKSTRIP HERE! 

 

PreSonus Fam Friday with Perry Tee!

This is a good one… Our Artist Relations Manager and Office favorite and all around coolest guy in the world Perry Tee is up for PreSonus Fam Friday! Read all about him below and be sure to follow him on Instagram!

1. How long have you worked for PreSonus?

Almost 7 years now. I started in July of 2012.

2. What’s your official job title?

“Hello… my name is Perry Tee, Artist Relations Manager at PreSonus Audio Electronics, Inc.”

3. What’s your favorite thing about your job? Why did you choose to work here?

Being able to pull from all my skillsets and talents on a daily basis to succeed at my day job.

From my training and experiences as a musician performing live onstage (starting with the cello at age 8) or in recording sessions… to my inner-nerd working in software environments (I started coding in Python around the time I got serious about the guitar, which was years before I used my first DAW 👉 Emagic Logic 4.5)… to sales/supply chain logistics (was a purchaser for major multimedia company back in the day, when we still bought DVD’s and CD’s as a society). I am also a polyglot (English, Mandarin, Portuguese, French and some Japanese) so that comes in handy in terms of communicating effectively with people from all different walks of life around the globe.

So, I moved out to Louisiana from California back in 2012 to get away; a “perspective change/sabbatical” if you will. Being the “birthplace of Jazz” New Orleans (NO) still has a vibrant live music scene compared to other cities these days, so I had enough $$$ saved up to live for at least 6 months. PreSonus is based an hour northwest of NO and they were hiring, so I applied on a whim, got hired and moved to Baton Rouge. Even though I no longer live in the 225, I’m still very lucky to be working daily with such amazing people… no other company is quite like PreSonus in terms of camaraderie and dedication to making things happen, IMO.

4. Choose a movie title for the story of your life.

“Interstellar”. I travel between many different ‘worlds’ and can access experiences from all points in the timeline of my life’s stored memory banks to find viable solutions and resolving issues effectively. Never journeyed through a wormhole, though.

5. What was the first 8-track, cassette, CD or digital download you purchased?

DEVO “Freedom Of Choice.”

6. Who’s your go-to band or artist(s) when you can’t decide on something to listen to?

Snarky Puppy, Thundercat, Bibi Bourelly, Ryan Adams & The Cardinals or just about any slide guitar solo performed by Derek Trucks.

7. What’s your go-to Karaoke song?

“Regulate Ft. Nate Dogg” by Warren G.

8. Everyone has a side gig, what’s yours? OR when you’re not at PreSonus, what are you up to?

Playing guitar/guitar synth with Eric Levy (keyboardist with Night Ranger/Garaj Mahal), Jon Cornell (bassist with Jackie Greene/SNL Band) and Jakubu Griffin (drummer with Cirque Du Soleil Zarkana/NYC jazz heavies/Vega$ show ensembles).

Check out our very first YouTube video performance (we collaborated remotely using PreSonus Studio One 4 Pro DAW) of “Pax Humana” here:

But when I’m not PreSonus’ing (which is pretty much every day!), I’m in full-on #DadMode and LOVING every moment.

9. What instruments do you play?

Guitar, guitar synthesizer, cello, bass, piano, drums, the PreSonus ATOM and PreSonus Studio One 4 Pro… which are to both be considered as creative musical instruments, IMO!

10. What do you love about the guitar?

The art of drawing out *tone* using my bare fingers on metal strings… vibrating from nut to bridge saddles, captured by the magnetic pickup and passed through a hand-wired tube amplifier which gets translated into the final sound output at the speaker cone. Just being able to make a sound and sing through this “interfacing” is a reward in an of itself. Hopefully I can keep playing guitar to the end of my journey 🙏.

11. Why did you choose this as your favorite?

What I love most about playing guitar it is that I get to engage in real-time musical conversations with other willing musicians and express myself freely without being bound by the spoken or written language construct. When those moments of true musical chemistry and magic happen, you know it’s because the people involved are actively listening to one another, putting their heart and soul into the collective effort and channeling it as a group “sonic painting” event that rarely happens exactly the same way twice.

Speaking of musical magic, did y’all see Kodi Lee’s recent audition video on “America’s Got Talent”? I was moved to 😭especially when his Dad lifts him up onstage near the end. Maaaaan!

 

12. Tell us about a successful event you worked with PreSonus products. InfoComm, NAMM, or an Install somewhere.

I’ve worked so many NAMM Shows over the past decade+ demoing gear and fielding questions, it’s become an annual reference marker for me like family birthdays. I always look forward to the group dinners after a long, grueling day at Booth #18701.

13. Got any tips for working with Studio One?

Yes!!! Watch my Studio One “1-Minute” Tip videos on my Instagram feed here: https://instagram.com/da.real.agentp/

14. What are you currently working on at PreSonus? What’s next for you?

Finding more relevant product/use case resonant relationships for the company… we’re really interested in YouTubers and IG Influencers/Reviewers in addition to existing Artists, Producers, Touring Bands, Live FOH Engineers, Studio Mix Engineers, and Mastering Engineers.

15. What’s the strangest talent you have?

I used to be able to perform the Doctor Who theme (lead synth melody line) using a cello bow on the edge of a standard hand saw; all while having gulped an entire packet of grape-flavored Pop Rocks and not letting the chaos inside my mouth affect my musical performance. That talent came to an end when all the bow hair frayed out… GAME OVER.

16. Anything else you want to share?

“No amount of money ever bought a second of time” (Howard Stark, The Avengers Endgame) resonates 💯 and I hope that we all can take that quote to heart, as we make decisions that will inevitably shape the reality of what future generations will inherit from us.

 Basically, choose wisely what you do with every moment of your lifetime and don’t take anything for granted!

 17. What’s your social media handles and is it OK to tag you?

Of course. Follow me on Instagram @da.real.agentp and hit me up via DM anytime.

Friday Tips: Studio One’s Secret Equalizer

[Announcement: the follow-up book to “How to Record and Mix Great Vocals in Studio One” is now available—hop on over to the PreSonus Shop to check out “More than Compressors: The Complete Guide to Dynamics in Studio One.” Thank you! We now return to our regularly scheduled programming.]

 

Pop quiz: How many EQ plug-ins ship with Studio One Pro?

If you answered seven, congratulations! Then you know about the Pro EQ, the three different Fat Channel EQs, Ampire’s Graphic Equalizer, the Channel Strip, and using the Multiband Dynamics as a really hip graphic EQ. But actually, the correct answer is eight.

If you turn off the “auto” aspects of the Autofilter, you can take advantage of two filters, each with multiple filter topologies: three “rhymes-with-vogue”-style lowpass Ladder filters (sorry, if I mention the actual synthesizer name, I get hassled), two analog state-variable filters (yes, the same topology as the infamous Project #17, the “Super Tone Control,” in my book Electronic Projects for Musicians), one digital state-variable filter, a comb filter, and a zero-delay, 24/dB octave low-pass filter. Furthermore, you can route the two filters in series, or in parallel, as well as offset their cutoff frequencies from each other by up to 2 octaves.

The state-variable filters are particularly interesting because you can alter the response continuously from lowpass, to bandpass, to highpass, all with variable cutoff and resonance. This gives responses that are difficult, if not impossible, to obtain any other way.
So who cares about different filter types, anyway—other than guitar players who want to get totally rad wah effects? Well, these are invaluable for sound design, FX and breaks for DJs, synthesizer sweeps, and to add spice to tracks that sound just too darn normal. Don’t think of these filters necessarily as standard EQ, but more like EQ-based special effects. These parameters are automatable too, which opens up even more possibilities.

Using the testing procedure described in the Testing, Testing tip from May 16, let’s look at some of the spectral responses this exceptionally versatile pair of filters can produce.

But First, Turn Off Everything that Says Auto

To use the Autofilter as a filter, we need to turn off the automated aspects. Ctrl+click on both pairs of Env and LFO sliders to zero them out. Now we’re left with only the filters, not the modulators trying to control them. Also turn off the gain’s Auto function, because in some of the unusual ways we’ll be using the filter, overloading and nasty distortion can result from Auto gain.

Filtering Time

Fig. 1 shows the response for the 24 dB/octave ladder filter, with resonance turned up. Note that the Pro EQ high cut (lowpass) and low cut (highpass) filters can’t create this kind of curve, because they don’t have resonance controls. This is very much like the response of the classic rhymes-with-“vogue” filter, and you can automate the filter cutoff for grandiose filter sweeps.

Figure 1: 24/dB ladder response, with resonance.

 

But wait! There’s more—because there are two different filter sections, you can offset the resonant frequencies to create double peaks. In Fig. 2, the frequencies are offset by two octaves, and the filters are in parallel (see the section outlined in orange). So now we have a double-peak ladder filter…cool.

 

 

Figure 2: Double-peak ladder filter.

 

We can also do the “twin peaks” type of filter effect with the state-variable filters set to bandpass mode (Fig. 3). Here the filters are in parallel, and as with the above curve, they’re offset two octaves apart.

Figure 3: Dual bandpass filters in parallel can create twin peak filter responses, with fairly steep “skirts” on both sides of the peaks.

If you chain the two state-variable filters in series, set them to bandpass mode, don’t offset them, and boost the resonance, the filter curve makes a wonderful wah pedal (Fig. 4). The peak is sharp, with a steep rolloff on either side.

 

Figure 4: If you’re looking for a wah pedal sound…start here.

 

This also produces a strong sense of pitch with white or pink noise. One cool trick is using this setting to add a “tuned” aspect to snare drums, and other percussion instruments. Edit Studio One’s Tone Generator plug-in to generate pink noise, feed that into the above filter configuration, turn up the resonance, tune the cutoff to the desired pitch, then gate the noise with a snare hit. Mix in the desired amount of noise to give the drum a sense of pitch.

 

The highpass setting is useful as well, because you can obtain what’s popularly called the “voice of the Gods” effect for announcing and narration. Using a highpass filter gets rid of the super-low-frequency p-pops, but the resonance adds a boost in the bass range above the nasty stuff, so the voice still sounds full and big (Fig. 5).

Figure 5: A high-pass filter with resonance can do wonders for narration.

It’s also possible to create responses that are just plain unusual, like this notch + double peak outside of the notch (Fig. 6). For some sound-design type wind sounds, drop the resonance to around 30%, and sweep the cutoff between 2 kHz and 6 kHz. Modulating randomly around a relatively low cutoff frequency can also give good rain and downpour sounds. Besides, who doesn’t like a curve that looks like Batman.

 

Figure 6: This unusual filter response has various uses for sound design.

Combining two different filter topologies can also give interesting results. Fig. 7 shows a ladder filter in parallel with a state variable filter, along with considerable amounts of resonance. If you really want to scope out this configuration’s flexibility, vary the Filter 2 slider to alter the topology, and/or vary the Filter Spread to change the offset between the two filter types. Of course, changing resonance alters the sound even further.

Figure 7: This filter configuration is in love with sound design and automation.

 

And finally…this is going to sound ridiculous, but bear with me. I often augment sampled female choir presets; octave lower sine waves mixed in subtly can give the illusion of a male choir combined with a female choir. But that’s not all—noise can be a powerful enhancer for choirs, and it’s possible to set the Autofilter to impart vocal-like qualities to pink noise.

 

For this application, the Zero Delay LP 24 dB is the filter of choice to insert after the Tone Generator’s pink noise output, because the filtering has a smooth kind of quality, even with high resonance. To concentrate the spectrum on voice, a Pro EQ follows the Autofilter to take off the highs and lows outside of the vocal range (Fig. 8).

Figure 8: The Pro EQ shapes the pink noise into more of the vocal range.

 

Okay, now for the bummer: You can’t control the Autofilter cutoff, and therefore the pitch, with notes—only controllers. That’s not a problem if you just need a kind of pedal point choir addition; tune the cutoff to the desired pitch, and use volume automation to bring it in and out.

One workaround is to sample the resulting choir-like noise at different pitches, and load them into Sample One XT (or Impact XT) so you can create envelopes that match the envelope of whatever choir sound you’re using, and play the notes from a keyboard. The result is uncanny—in some ways, it makes a sampled choir sound more like a real choir than if it consisted only of samples. And finally, for sound design, don’t forget that filtered white noise can also augment crowd sounds.

Autofilter? Okay, yeah, well…I guess. But there’s a lot more to the story than just wah pedals and funk bass.

Grab a copy of Craig’s latest eBook here! 

Get the CTC-1 Pro Console Shaper FREE when you buy or upgrade to Studio One Professional—June 2019 Only!

For a limited time—if you get Studio One Professional (either a new copy or an upgrade), we’ll throw in the CTC-1 Pro Console shaper for FREE—that’s a $79.99 USD value!  All you have to do is buy Studio One and CTC-1 Pro Console Shaper will appear in your my.presonus.com account.

The CTC-1 Pro Console Shaper brings analog console modeling to Studio One with three great-sounding console models and several major enhancements to the Mix Engine FX environment. It’s the second plug-in developed for the Mix Engine FX interface in Studio One and the next evolution of plug-ins from the included Console Shaper.

Utilizing state-of-the-art State Space Modeling technology, CTC-1 captures the character and personality of legendary analog consoles that are otherwise out of reach for most musicians, producers and engineers. Going far beyond virtual channel strips and mastering plug-ins, CTC-1 is capable of changing the way how people mix inside a DAW.

Mix Engine FX are capable of processing every channel of the mixer separately with just a single plug-in instance. When added to a bus channel or the main output channel, every signal routed into that channel is processed independently at the source, allowing the plug-in to transform the sound of an entire mix while still maintaining the nuances and dynamics of every individual channel. Although being suited for many different applications, Mix Engine FX are tailored for analog console emulation. The original Console Shaper and the new CTC-1 both belong in this category.

Save 30% on PreSonus Symphonic Orchestra in June 2019!

PreSonus Symphonic Orchestra is more than just another sample library. It combines a complete symphonic orchestra instrument library with ready-to-use Studio One Musicloops for lightning-fast arranging and production in an attractively-priced bundle. The instruments not only comprise a full symphony orchestra, but also a contemporary strings library that has a different ambient character to choose from. More than 1,200 Musicloops allow for creating full arrangements on the fly while retaining complete control over tempo, key, chords and sound character. Tight integration with Studio One makes production work fun again. PreSonus Symphonic Orchestra is compatible with Studio One Prime, Artist and Professional (version 3.3.4 or higher), making it an ideal combination for aspiring composers and arrangers, as well as anyone learning or teaching music theory.

With more than 1,200 royalty-free loops from 29 unique Construction Kits, PreSonus Symphonic Orchestra is a powerful composition and arranging tool even for someone who doesn’t have classical training or doesn’t play a keyboard instrument. Produced by professional orchestral composers, these Construction Kits cover a wide range of styles and instrument arrangements: Classical, Soundtrack, Jazz, Pop, Hip-Hop, House, Disco, and more.

Don’t miss this deal. Ends June 30, 2019, and is available worldwide right out of the PreSonus Shop!

 

Click here to shop! 

SAVE 30% on EarthMoments Add-ons

All EarthMoments Add-ons are 30% off in June 2019, available only at shop.presonus.com.

Chennai, South India’s Earth Moments continues to produce exceptionally high-quality sample collections of instruments from across the globe. They’re also quite prolific—at the time of this writing, there are no fewer than TWENTY-SEVEN different Earth Moments products available in our online shop. Many of their recordings are recorded in the field using warm Neve and SSL preamps and Neumann vintage tube mics—and all are recorded to a click track, so syncing them to your projects won’t be an issue. Furthermore, all samples are royalty-free, so you can use them in whatever you like, including commercial endeavors.

Are you getting a little burned out on bass, guitar, and drums? Need some special flavor for that short film score you’re working on? It could be that a little bit of Celtic Harp or Arabic Percussion is exactly what you need. And if your EDM mixes are starting to sound a little stale, Dubstep India is sure to make your tracks stand out from your competition. Here’s a short list of some of the Earth Moments Add-ons available at this discounted price:

 

Click here to shop online and hear some audio demos.

 

Nektar Technology Integration for Studio One is here!

NektarTech just announced their new DAW Integration for Studio One!

The new integration delivers a completely transparent control experience including features such as display of track and parameter names, extended transport control, project navigation, mixer operation, tweaking of virtual instruments and instant control of any selected parameter in Studio One.

Being able to tweak virtual instruments like hardware synths or mixing with full parameter feedback considerably speeds up the workflow. Dedicated “Mixer” and “Instrument” mode buttons switch Panorama’s control surface to take over the corresponding parameters in Studio One at the press of a button, literally.

Users can now log in to their Nektar account and download the required files. Not only are the integrations for the Panorama T4 and T6 available now, they’ve also added integration software for the Panorama P1, P4 and P6. In fact, ALL Nektar controllers now have DAW integration for Studio One, from their smallest controller (the SE25), to Impact GX, Impact LX+, Pacer (!) and Panorama.

The Panorama support is for version 4 and higher, all other products also support version 3 (with Panorama obviously having the most features also due to the displays.)

Full features and specifications:

  • Extended transport control including setting locators, metronome, automation and undo.
  • Project navigation including switching channels, opening windows, zooming and more.
  • Full parameter feedback on Panorama display
  • Encoders control Pan, sends, macro, automation and more.
  • Patch browsing for all internal instruments
  • Open/close mixer view and instrument windows
  • Maps customizable by using Studio One Learn
  • All maps structured in the same way:
    • Faders 1-4 commonly mapped to amp envelope
    • Faders 5-8 commonly mapped to filter envelope
    • Fader 9/Motor Fader controls instrument main volume
    • “Data” encoder click-control any visible parameter
  • Control 8 channels at the same time, Bank -/+ to control more channels (1-8 / 9-16 etc.)
  • Current track controlled by fader 9 (or motor fader on P4 and P6)
  • Master Volume Control
  • Volume assigned to faders 1-8. Solo, mute and channel selection via fader buttons
  • Pan, sends or channel macros assignable to encoders
  • Panorama P series offers additional control over channel inserts and insert plugins
  • Soft Take-Over mode eliminates parameter value jumping
  • Supports Nektarine PlugIn host for deep instrument mapping

 

Friday Tips: In Praise of Saturation

Sure, everyone sorta knows about saturation. But let’s drill down, give some audio examples that really get the point across, and explain how saturation can help everything from individual tracks to master tapes. Really.

To be clear, we’re not talking about the distortion that “flat-tops” a waveform. Fig. 1 shows a comparison of unsaturated, saturated, and distorted versions of the same waveform (using version 4.5’s new “smooth” waveform view feature).

 

Figure 1: The gray waveform is unsaturated, the blue saturated, and the yellow distorted.

Comparing the three, in the section outlined in red, the saturated version is louder but the waveform isn’t all that different from the unsaturated audio. The distorted waveform is louder than the saturated one, but the peaks are flattened. This is particularly noticeable with the negative-going peak highlighted in black. Flattening peaks produces the kind of nasty digital distortion no one really likes, but saturation is a different animal…as the audio examples will show.

Before going any further, if you don’t have the free Softube Saturation knob, go to your PreSonus account and download it from Products > Add-Ons (Fig. 2).

 

Figure 2: What are you waiting for? It’s free.

It’s a pretty basic module—turn the knob clockwise for more saturation (but I’ve never turned it up as high as shown in the picture!). Keep Low means it will apply more saturation to high frequencies, Keep High means more saturation for low frequencies, and Neutral means equal-opportunity saturation for all frequencies.

Saturation is great with drums, including mixed drums. You’ll get more punch and level (Fig. 3) that helps drums stand out in a track, without any of the artifacts (like pumping or breathing) associated with some dynamics processors.

Figure 3: The waveform for the drums audio example. Unsaturated is blue, saturated is red.

Now listen to the audio example. The first four measures are the unsaturated version, the last four measures the saturated one. Note that both were normalized to the same peak value. Even though the waveforms don’t look all that different, the saturated version really punches through—yet doesn’t sound “distorted.” This same kind of approach can also work well for bass.

 Now, let’s move on to saturating a two-track master. This may sound like a bad idea, until you realize that tape emulation plug-ins are basically just adding saturation, although some do it with a bit more finesse than a simple saturation plug-in (e.g., the Waves J37 provides different virtual tape formulations and bias settings). Fig. 4 shows the audio example’s waveform.

Figure 4: The two blue, four-measure groups are unsaturated; the two red, four-measure groups are saturated.

The audio example is excerpted/adapted from the song All Over Again (Every Day). I added a very slight pause between the unsaturated and saturated sections, although I’m quite sure you’ll hear the difference anyway. (To hear the final, mastered song—which of course was done in Studio One—click on the link.)

For this kind of application, you don’t want to apply too much saturation—a little bit goes a long way. As you turn up the knob you may think it’s not really making a difference, but it is. Toggle bypass frequently for a reality check. Fig. 5 shows the settings used for the master tape example.

 

And there you have it—we’ve done our shoutout for saturation. If you’ve missed out on the fun, load it in a track, and listen to what happens. You just might like what you hear!

The Manly Hanley Podcast chooses Studio One and StudioLive Series III

Randy Hanley is the founder and host of the Manly Hanley podcast. He’s been using Studio One and a StudioLive mixer to produce the show, and sent us a TON of info on his production method and why he’s chosen PreSonus. If you’re looking to get into Podcasting, this is a great read.

 

Give us some background on yourself. Who are you, what do you do, and how long have you been podcasting?

I started out as a drummer, professionally teaching at music stores for 12 years. Drums lead me to learn about computers and technology through my interest in recording. I received a certificate at the Recording Institute of Detroit, back when we were still using mini ADAT Recorders, just when a software that rhymes with “Mo’ Jewels” was becoming “the thing.” There was just something about Mo’ Jewels that I was never able to become comfortable with.

I heard of PreSonus, when a music store colleague of mine mentioned that he was going to buy the ACP 88 Compressor. I didn’t even know what it was at the time, but he explained it to me, how it offered all of this compression/multiple channels, at an extremely great value. That’s basically the very first time I heard of PreSonus.

I started a Podcast back in 2011 called “Getting Android,” but I never followed through with it. After I bought my PreSonus FireStudio Project rig for recording music, I realized that I have way more than enough power/setup to do a simple podcast, so why not give it a try? Well, I eventually got around to it, in 2019 and I’m glad I did. I’m more of a reborn podcaster, so technically, I’ve been doing it (consistently) since January.

 

What PreSonus products do you use?

I use Studio One 4.5 Artist and the StudioLive 16, Series III. I originally started with the FireStudio Project.

 

What features, in particular, make StudioLive and Studio One suitable for podcasters?

The Templates, ease-of-use, and the perfect integration between Studio One and basically ANY hardware interfaces.

For Podcasting, I’ve created my own template, which you can see below.

What I think really makes PreSonus Studio One accessible to Podcasters? It’s future-proof. For instance, many podcasters move into doing more with their podcast, and that often includes Video/Vlogging. With the Professional edition of Studio One, you have all you need to not have to jump between programs! It’s tiring to jump back and forth from Camtasia (because its audio features are terrible), just to grab the audio file from a DAW.  Studio One has it all there in one place. I won’t have to worry about sync issues, or format confusion, because the recent format additions in Studio One 4.5 are amazing and all I’ll ever need.

I also have noticed that Studio One is easy on the CPU/RAM resources–which I think is very important to us Podcasters–My machine isn’t a video-rendering beast–I just use it to record audio and Studio One is extremely fast, even on my somewhat modest machine.

I never feel like I’m lost with the way I can label things. It’s easy enough for my co-host to sit a tablet on the StudioLive and remotely control the faders of the mixer if we need to fix levels. Additionally, the labels on the mixer can reflect what I’ve named them in Studio One. I feel like there is always a way for me to get the job done with PreSonus.

Before I purchased the StudioLive 16, I thought to myself that this might be total overkill to use for a podcast. But then I thought back to how many products I’ve wasted my money on over the years, such as cheaper USB microphones. All of the money I spent on those products easily cost more than just buying this mixer, which includes Studio One anyway. It was a no-brainer. (Incidentally,  I recently heard that PreSonus dropped the price on some of the Series III mixers as much as $200.)

Additionally, I was frequenting some Facebook podcasting groups, seeing which kind of problems users commonly had. Users were always running into issues setting up Audacity. Users also ask questions about “Where do I get my Podcast edited, produced, normalized, compressed…” the list went on an on. I realized I could do ALL of the above in Studio One. It’s a HUGE money-saver when it comes to producing my own podcast. I’m not paying anyone to do anything other than advertising and host my Podcast. The way I’m looking at it, I’m saving a ton of money each and every month producing it on my own. With my plug-ins and templates inside of Studio One, I don’t really have to do much editing, ever!

I heard so many good things about Studio One, especially that it was included with many of the hardware products that PreSonus sells and integrates well. Studio One can open projects from other DAWs such as Cubase, Pro Tools and others.

 

I also never have to worry about running out of inputs. I don’t know of a podcast that has 16 people talking at once 😊.

Also, with Studio One and my PreSonus hardware interface working with USB is the big sell for me doing this podcast. USB just works. I haven’t had to install any legacy drivers, etc.

 

What features are you most impressed with?

Ease-of-use and stability! Never crashes on me… EVER!

I am really impressed with how the StudioLive mixer has recall of the effects and fader positions–it doesn’t have to rely on my computer and Studio One’s project settings if I feel like just using the mixer as a LIVE MIXER. But then, if I want to jump into DAW mode, I can make the mixer follow the computer’s settings. There is so much flexibility, it’s crazy. I cannot think of anything I need. I’m also impressed that PreSonus uses AVB, an open standard that allows any vendor to support it. It’s not closed-minded and just feels like freedom. I’m an open-source guy whenever possible–it’s transparent and honest.

Oh, here’s a bonus feature: the community. The PreSonus forums are the best support you could ask for. When I started out with Studio One and my StudioLive mixer, I had a couple basic question. Embarrassingly, the answers were in the manual that came with the mixer, but the community was friendly and helped point me in the right direction. It’s like a small town of nice people wanting to help because they share similar passions, supporting this company that cares about its customers.

 

Any user tips or tricks or interesting stories based on your experience with PreSonus hardware and software?

I recorded some amazing bluegrass artists on some of the old FireStudio hardware and it still sounds phenomenal today.

As for tips, I’m a HUGE believer in templates. That’s the best way to be productive and save so much time. PreSonus templates are the best.

For Podcasting, I literally have to do zero cleanup. I have my effects set on the mixer (I typically use the Male Voice 1 or 2) and it applies just the right amount of compression and gating. I can do these effects on each individual Mic channel for each podcast co-host. I receive lots of compliments on how nice and clear the audio is. I share my experience often in some Podcast Support groups on Facebook, including this one.

 

What features do you want to see next in Studio One or StudioLive?

I’d like to maybe just a see a few more default templates, that are Podcast-specific, heck, I’ll share mine with any other Podcasters, just shoot me a message.

 

What’s next for you?

I hope to learn my mixer / DAW more. I want to do a live podcast eventually. I’d like to use the SD Card feature on the StudioLive mixer, because I know that Studio One makes it easier than ever to take those recordings, directly off the SD card, then opening the project, ready-to-edit on my computer!

 

End Boring MIDI Drum Parts!

I like anything that kickstarts creativity and gets you out of a rut—which is what this tip is all about. And, there’s even a bonus tip about how to create a Macro to make this process as simple as invoking a key command.

Here’s the premise. You have a MIDI drum part. It’s fine, but you want to add interest with a fill in various measures. So you move hits around to create a fill, but then you realize you want fills in quite a few places…and maybe you tend to fall into doing the same kind of fills, so you want some fresh ideas.

Here’s the solution: Studio One 4.5’s new Randomize menu, which can introduce random variations in velocity, note length, and other parameters. But what’s of interest for this application is the way Shuffle can move notes around on the timeline, while retaining the same pitch. This is great for drum parts.

The following drum part has a really simple pattern in measure 4—let’s spice it up. The notes follow an 8th note rhythm; applying shuffle will retain the 8th note rhythm, but let’s suppose you want to shuffle the fills into 16th-note rhythms.

 

Here’s a cool trick for altering the rhythm. If you’re using Impact, mute a drum you’re not using, and enter a string of 16th notes for that drum (outlined in orange in the following image). Then select all the notes you want to shuffle.

Go to the Action menu, and under Process, choose Randomize Notes. Next, click the box for Shuffle notes (outlined in orange).

 

 

Click on OK, and the notes will be shuffled to create a new pattern. You won’t hear the “ghost” 16th notes triggering the silent drum, but they’ll affect the shuffle. Here’s the pattern after shuffling.

 

If you like what you hear from the randomization, great. But if not, adding a couple more hits manually might do what you need. However, you can also make the randomizing process really efficient by creating a Macro to Undo/Shuffle/hit Enter.

 

Create the Macro by clicking on Edit|Undo in the left column, and then choose Add. Next, add Musical Functions|Randomize. For the Argument, check Shuffle notes; I also like to randomize Velocity between 40% and 100%. The last step in the Macro is Navigation|Enter. Finally, assign the Macro to a keyboard shortcut. I assigned it to Ctrl+Alt+E (as in, End Boring Drum Parts).

With the Macro, if you don’t like the results of the shuffle, then just hit the keyboard shortcut to initiate another shuffle…listen, decide, repeat as needed. (Note that you need to do the first in a series of shuffles manually because the Macro starts with an Undo command.) It usually doesn’t take too many tries to come up with something cool, or that with minimum modifications will do what you want. Once you have a fill you like, you can erase the ghost notes.

If the fill isn’t “dense” enough, no problem. Just add some extra kick, snare, etc. hits, do the first Randomize process, and then keep hitting the Macro keyboard shortcut until you hear a fill you like. Sometimes, drum hits will end up on the same note—this can actually be useful, by adding unanticipated dynamics.

Perhaps this sounds too good to be true, but try it. It’s never been easier to generate a bunch of fills—and then keep the ones you like best.