PreSonus Blog

Monthly Archives: July 2019


Video Using VocALign in Studio One Pro!

 

In this video, producer Paul Drew shows how VocALign seamlessly works inside Presonus Studio One Professional and almost instantly aligns the timing of multiple vocal tracks to a lead using ARA2, potentially saving hours of painstaking editing time.

ARA (Audio Random Access) is a pioneering extension for audio plug-in interfaces. Co-developed by Celemony and PreSonus, ARA technology enhances the communication between plug-in and DAW, and gives the plug-in and host instant access to the audio data. This video shows Studio One but the workflow is very similar in Cubase Pro & Nuendo, Cakewalk by Bandlab and Reaper.

Purchase VocALign today right out of the PreSonus Shop!

Friday Tip – Mid-Side Processing Made Easy

Mid-side (M-S) processing encodes a standard stereo track into a different type of stereo track with two separate components: the left channel contains the center of the stereo spread, or mid component, while the right channel contains the sides of the stereo spread—the difference between the original stereo file’s right and left channels (i.e., what the two channels don’t have in common). You can then process these components separately, and after processing, decode the separated components back into conventional stereo.

Is that cool, or what? It lets you get “inside the file,” sometimes to where you can almost remix a mixed stereo file. Need more kick and bass? Add some low end to the center, and it will leave the rest of the audio alone. Or bring up the level of only the sides to make the stereo image wider.

The key to M-S processing is the Mixtool plug-in, and its MS Transform button. The easiest way to get started with M-S processing is with the MS-Transform FX Chain (Fig. 1), found in the Browser’s FX Chains Mixing folder.

 

Figure 1: The MS-Transform FX Chain included with Studio One.

 

 

The upper Mixtool encodes the signal so that the left channel contains a stereo file’s center component, while the right channel contains the stereo file’s side components. This stereo signal goes to the Splitter, which separates the channels into the side and center paths. These then feed into the lower Mixtool, which decodes the M-S signal back into stereo. (The Limiter isn’t an essential part of this process, but is added for convenience.)

Even this simple implementation is useful. Turn up the post-Splitter gain slider in the Center path to boost the bass, kick, vocals, and other center components. Or, turn up the gain slider in the post-SplitterSide path to bring up the sides, for the wider stereo image we mentioned.

Fig. 2 shows a somewhat more developed FX Chain, where a Pro EQ boosts the highs on the sides. Boosting the highs adds a sense of air, which enhances the stereo image because highs are more directional.

 

Figure 2: The Image Enhancer FX Chain.

In addition to decoding the signal back to stereo, the second Mixtool has its Output Gain control accessible to compensate for any level differences when the FX Chain is bypass/enabled. Also, you can disable the MS Decoder (last button, lower right) to prevent converting the signal back into stereo, which makes it easy to hear what’s happening in the center and sides.

And of course…you can take this concept much further. Add a second EQ in the center channel, or a compressor if you want to squash the kick/snare/vocals a bit while leaving the sides alone. Try adding reverb to the sides but not the center, to avoid muddying what’s happening in the center. Or, add some short delays to the sides to give more of a room sound….the mind boggles at the possibilities, eh?

 

Download the Image Enhancer FX Chain here! 

Friday Tip – Panning Laws: Why They Matter

Spoiler alert: We’ll get into some rocket science stuff here, which probably doesn’t affect your projects much anyway…so if you prefer something with a more musical vibe, come back next week. But to dispel some of the confusion regarding an oft-misunderstood concept, keep reading.

You pan a mono signal from left to right. Simple, right? Actually, no. In the center, there’s a 3 dB RMS volume buildup because the same signal is in both channels. Ideally, you want the signal’s average level—its power—to have the same perceived volume, whether the sound is panned left, right, or center. Dropping the level when centered by 3 dB RMS accomplishes this. As a result, traditional hardware mixers tapered the response as you turned a panpot to create this 3 dB dip.

However, there are other panning protocols. (Before your head explodes, please note you don’t need to learn all this stuff—it’s just to give you an idea of the complexity of pan laws, because all we really need to do is understand how things work in Studio One.) For example, some engineers preferred more of a drop in the center, so that audio panned to the sides would “pop” more due to the higher level, and open up more space in the center for vocals, kick, and bass. You could accomplish the same result by adjusting the channel level and pan, but the additional drop was sort of like having a preference you didn’t need to think about. To complicate matters further, some mixers lowered the center signal compared to the sides, while others raised the side signals compared to the center. If a DAW does the latter, when you import a normalized file and pan it hard left or hard right, it will go above 0 and clip.

But wait! There’s more. Some engineers didn’t want equal power over the panpot’s entire travel, but a slightly different curve. Others wanted a linear change that didn’t dip the signal at all.

Fortunately, Studio One has a rational approach to pan laws, namely…

  • The panpots in Studio Once’s channels default to the traditional 3 dB dip, so there’s perceived constant level as you pan a mono signal from left to right. For stereo, they act as a balance control.
  • Although most programs set the pan law as a global preference, Studio One includes the Dual Pan plug-in, which offers five different pan laws. This lets different channels follow different pan laws.

THE “WHAT-THE-HECK-DO-PAN-LAWS-DO” TEST SETUP

To see how the different panning laws affect signal levels, I created a test setup (Fig. 1) with a mono track fed by the Tone Generator set to a sine wave. Two pre-fader sends went to two buses, each with a Dual Pan inserted and linked for mono. That way, one bus’s Dual Pan could be set for hard pan and the other bus’s Dual Pan for center, to compare what happens to the signal level.

 

Figure 1: Test setup to determine how different pan laws affect signal levels.

In all the following test result images, Track 1 shows the mono sine wave at 0 dB, Bus 1 shows the result of panning the Dual Pan full left, and Bus 2 shows the result of panning the Dual Pan to center.

Fig. 2 uses the -3dB Constant Power Sin/Cos setting for the Dual Pans. Note that the centered version in Bus 2 is 3 dB below the same signal panned full left. This is the same setting as the default for the channel panpots. However, if you collapse the output signal to mono, you’ll get a 3 dB center-channel buildup. (A fine point: setting the Main bus mode to mono affects signals leaving the main bus; the meters still show the incoming signal. To see what’s happening when you collapse the Main out to mono, you need to insert a Dual Pan in the Main bus, click on Link, and set all controls to center.)

 

Figure 2: -3dB Constant Power Sin/Cos pan law.

Fig. 3 uses the -6 dB linear curve. Here, the centered signal is -6 dB below the signal panned hard left. Use this curve if the signal is going to be collapsed to mono after the main bus, because it keeps the gain constant when you collapse stereo to mono by eliminating the +3 dB increase that would happen otherwise.

 

Figure 3: The -6 dB linear curve is often preferable if you’re mixing in stereo, but also anticipate that the final result will end up being collapsed to mono.

Fig. 4 shows the resulting signal from the 0dB Balanced Sin/Cos setting. There’s no bump or decrease compared to the centered signal, so this acts like a balance control with a constant amount of gain as you pan from left to right.

Figure 4:  0dB Balanced Sin/Cos acts like a balance control.

Sharp-eyed readers who haven’t dozed off yet may have noticed we haven’t covered two variations on the curves described so far. -3dB Constant Power Sqrt (Fig. 5; Sqrt stands for Square Root) is like the ‑3 dB Constant Power Sin/Cos, but the curve is subtly different.

 

Figure 5: -3dB Constant Power Sqrt bends the curve shape slightly compared to the other Constant Power curve.

In this example, the panpot is set to 75% left instead of full left. Bus 1 shows what happens with -3dB Constant Power Sin/Cos, while Bus 2 is the Sqrt version. The Sqrt version is in less of a hurry to attenuate the right channel as you pan toward the left. Some engineers feel this more closely the situation in a space that’s not acoustically treated, so there’s a natural acoustic center buildup.

Finally, Fig. 6 compares the 0 dB Balance variations, sin/cos and linear.

 

 

 

Figure 6: Comparing the two 0 dB Balance pan law options.

The difference is similar to the Constant Power examples, in that the basic idea is the same, but again, the linear version doesn’t attenuate the right channel as rapidly when you pan left.

I HAVEN’T FALLEN ASLEEP YET, SO PLEASE, JUST TELL ME WHAT I SHOULD USE!

The bottom line is when using the channel panpot with a mono track, if you live in a stereo mixdown world the above is mostly of academic interest. But if you’re mixing in stereo and know that your mix will be collapsed to mono (e.g., for broadcast), consider using the Dual Pan in mono channels, and set it to the -6 dB Linear pan law.

For stereo audio, again, a channel panpot works as it should—it acts like a balance control. However if the output is going to be collapsed into mono, you might want to leave the channel panpot centered, and insert a Dual Pan control to do the panning. It should be set to -6 dB Linear, controls unlinked, and then you move both controls equally to pan (e.g., if you want the sound slightly right of center, set both the left and right panpots to 66% right). Now when you pan, the mono levels in the main bus will be constant.

ONE MORE TAKEAWAY…

And finally…I’m sure you’ve seen people on the net who swear that DAW “A” sounds better than DAW “B” because they exported the tracks from one DAW, brought them into a second DAW, set the channel faders and panpots the same, and then were shocked that the two DAWs didn’t sound identical. And for further proof, they note that after mixing down the outputs and doing a null test, the outputs didn’t null. Well, maybe that proves that DAWs are different…but maybe what it really proves is that different programs default to different pan laws, so of course, there are bound to be differences in the mixes.

Save 30% on Woodwind Bundle for Notion in July 2019!

Get six Notion Add-ons for one low price! T his bundle includes the following woodwind instruments:

  • Alto Flute
    • Legato, Vibrato, Staccato, Flutter Tongue, Trills
  • Bass Flute
    • Legato, Vibrato, Staccato, Flutter Tongue, Trills
  • Contrabass Clarinet (wooden)
    • Legato, Staccato, Trills
  • Basset Horn
    • Legato, Staccato, Trills
  • Oboe d’amore
    • Legato, Vibrato, Staccato, Trills
  • Bass Oboe
    • Legato, Vibrato, Staccato, Trills

This offer ends July 31 – act fast!

Click here to shop!

 

HURRY – Half Off MVP Loops out the PreSonus Shop!

It’s the DEAL of the SUMMER! For one week only, save 50% off on ALL MVP Loops right out of the PreSonus Shop!

MVP Loops provide some of our most popular, top-selling loops and their whole collection is half off right now! Some of MVPs greatest hits include:

  • Afro Pop
  • Dark Moon
  • Drip
  • Feelings
  • Lights
  • Urban Paparazzi
  • Latin Trap

Check them out in the Shop here!

 

Limited Time Only – HALF OFF Ampire XT for SEVEN Days!

For SEVEN DAYS only– Score the Ampire XT Metal Pack for 50% OFF right out of the PreSonus Shop!

The Ampire XT Metal Pack is an Extension for PreSonus’ Ampire XT Native Effects plug-in with six new roaring amp models and six new cajun-encrusted speaker-cabinet emulations designed to bleach the tats off metal guitarists. Adding to the lethal-weapon qualities of this Pack is a brand-new Metal Drumkit for the Impact virtual drum instrument.

HURRY! This offer is available from July 1 through July 7, 2019 and is offered worldwide!

Click here to shop!

 

 

 

 

July ONLY – 30% OFF Chocolate Audio Pianos for Presence XT!

Looking for some of the best-sounding pianos you can get for Studio One? Look no further than this Piano Collection from Chocolate Audio. And, lucky you, save 30% on the whole collection for the month of July 2019! 

Three different pianos are available, each recorded with high-quality mics and expensive preamps. They also take advantage of Presence XT’s advanced scripting functionality to simulate the behavior of these beloved instruments as accurately as digitally possible.

Click on over to shop.presonus.com to hear audio demos of these incredible-sounding instruments. And if you’re still not sure after listening… get the combo pack of all three! The Chocolate Audio Piano Collection for Studio One is available only at shop.presonus.com.

Last but not least:

The Chocolate Audio Pianos are compatible with Studio One 3.2 or later: Prime, Artist, and Professional editions.

All of the pianos in this family have the following onboard script controls:

  • Tuning: 440/442 Hz
  • Level control for Sustain Resonances, Pedal Noise and Release samples
  • Velocity Curve control
  • Hold, Decay, Release envelope controls
  • Touch Response* control: sets the amount of pre-attack key noise heard, sets the attack time at higher settings.

This offer is valid through the month of July 2019 and available worldwide!

Click here to shop!