PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: Mixing Systems


Monster April Savings Opportunities

We have a LOT of promos going on this month. Even we’re having a hard time keeping track of them all. That’s all Rick’s fault, really. But it’s because he likes you all so much! Here’s the gist of it:

Buy a StudioLive 24.4.2, get a free PRM1 reference mic!  Here’s the Free PRM1 Form. You can get more details here. Offer ends May 31.

 We’ve dropped the prices on two of our StudioLive mixers! Get the 16.4.2 for $1,799 and the 24.4.2 for $2,999. No rebates, no buy-two-get-one-free, just a lower price. Wow!

Studio One Professional 2.5, $100 off through April! Get with the best for a low low price! This is an instant rebate that will be available through your local PreSonus dealer or StudioOne.PreSonus.Com.

 

Save $30 bucks on a TubePre V2. This is an instant rebate available at your local PreSonus dealer. Easy money.

Save a whopping $50 on the PreSonus Studio Channel. This is another easy instant rebate available at your local PreSonus dealer.
Last, but certainly not least, if you upgrade from any other version of Studio One to Studio One Professional 2.5, you are entitled to the Simon Phillips Session Tracks drum loop library for FREE! Click here for the rebate form so you can grab your copy—ASAP!

 

Controlling Feedback With The StudioLive and Smaart from Sonic Sense Pro Audio

Marc Nutter, VP at Sonic Sense shares a couple techniques for controlling stage monitor feedback using the PreSonus Studiolive 24.4.2 and Rational Acoustics Smaart. Thanks guys!

The StudioLive 16.4.2s at Rapa Nui’s Tapati Festival

[This just in from Mauricio Yáñez Polloni, of our distributor partner, Croma Limitada.]

The guy at the StudioLives in these pictures is Mauricio Romero, my friend, who has lived for 10 years on Rapa Nui! He did all the audio production for the Tapati, an annual festival that lasts for 10 days! Tapati was first performed during the first ten days of February, 1975. The festival began as a one among islanders, but now is an instance to share culture with tourists visiting around that time of year.

Two linked StudioLive 16.4.2s were the heart of the sound of this important event, running the live sound and recording the bands simultaneously. The show was recorded in Capture and then edited, mixed, and mastered in Studio One 2.5.

Mauricio Romero is the founder of the most important sound company of the island, Matau Producciones. He also has produced many albums with ethnic music of Rapa Nui.

This year, Matau Producciones did all sound and lighting for Tapati as well. Saludos!

StudioLive LIVE at Live at The Loft, LIVE!

[This just in from Tone from Live at the Loft, an amazing music video production cleverly disguised as a music venue. All shows are invite-only, free, recorded by a StudioLive 24.4.2, and filmed by a really nice camera. As a result, their website is rife with high-quality live performance footage from about a zillion bands, and if you look close you’ll spot a StudioLive in some of them! Tone gave us a little more info about his recording rig for The Loft. It follows.]
We’ve got a  50′ 16 channel XLR stage snake connected right to the StudioLive 24.4.2.  The stage snake also connects our stage monitors from the AUX outs of the board. The StudioLive is connected to an i7 Mac Laptop running Capture. We record the DJ sets and live performances through the console and Capture, which usually run about 4 or 5 hours in total.  From there, I export the stems from Capture, zip them and upload to WeTransfer for download by our audio engineer in California.
The main reason the StudioLive 24.4.2 kicks butt for us is its ability to control the house mix separately of the mix to disk. That, and its rock-solid reliability, and that it records 24 tracks over FireWire.

 

Sweetwater’s NAMM 2013 Coverage of the StudioLive 32.4.2AI

Our friends at Sweetwater spent some time at our NAMM booth getting details on the StudioLive 32.4.2AI from Rodney, our European Product Marketing Manager and technocrat. Big thanks to both!



StudioLive 24.4.2 on the Adam Corolla Show

[This just in from Mike Dawson, Engineer/Voice/Producer on The Adam Carolla Show!]

Hey PreSonus!

I wanted to share a bit about our use of the StudioLive 24.4.2 on our broadcast. It’s awesome to have all the built-in effects. I never know what’s going to happen at any given moment on the Adam Carolla Show. Debbie Gibson was a guest on our show during  her and Adam’s run on Celebrity Apprentice together.  She started singing “Billy, Don’t be a Hero,” by Bo Donaldson. I immediately mixed her mic into the reverb I’ve selected for solo vocal performances (always impromptu!)  and she sounded pretty bitchin’.  She looked at me through the glass and winked, saying something like “Hey, you’ve got an engineer that knows what he’s doing.” Adam joined in the song, and with the touch of a button they have perfect studio quality reverb on vocals. After the show, Debbie Gibson hugged me.

Most recently, David Alan Grier was doing a hilariously dirty Teddy Pendergrast impression. Again, in milliseconds, reverb is up and easily engaged and disengaged without having to fumble through auxiliaries and faders. This is a bad-ass piece of machinery. I use it in my own production studio, and even travel with it for on-site recording and engineering gigs.

The StudioLive console is so easy to set up for impromptu live performances in the studio. In the past few months, I’ve engineered and mixed live performances by Barry Zito and Kelley James, Susanna Hoffs and Hoobastank, and they all sounded like they were supposed to.

Damn good.

 

Source Distribution TV’s PreSonus Coverage from NAMM 2013

[This just in from Source Distribution! Thanks for the coverage, guys, and Rodney: good work!]

Leading by Example in the Dog-Eat-Dog World of XLR Cable Management

[This just in from Jan-Arend, StudioLive Wizard at Large and Executive Cable Manager.]

IMG_3330Hey guys,

Want to show you something. I saw Big Joe Daddy’s Big Multi-Pin Panel-Box Thingy post on the PreSonus blog. It looked very professional! I too use the StudioLive 24.4.2 on various occasions and locations.
We all want to get the best mixing position for our bands and the easiest place for the console. But having said this, we all know that having at least 30 cables to the mixer on the other end of the stage isn’t easy. It gets messy. So I wanted a flexible solution for my band(s).
One band is very different from the other. One is almost completely acoustic, with 3 vocals, acoustic/electric bass and guitar, accordion, and drums. We use two auxes for wedge mixes. The other band is completely electric, with 3 vocals, drums, electric piano, guitars, and basses. No amps on stage, and four stereo in-ear mixes for monitoring. My StudioLive is also used in churches and other events.

I wanted to make a flexible and very compact snake-system that I could use in both situations. I wanted to have the possibility to get all 24 channels from the stage to the Studiolive, and to get the main and subgroup-outputs plus all the aux outputs back to the stage. Ordinarily, this would require a single 40-channel snake. Everybody knows that these cables are heavy, and not easy to use at all. And every time, I would have to plug in 40 cables into my mixer.
Now my solution:IMG_3334
I had a 30-meter 16.4 snake for a couple of years, and I thought, ”Why not have two of these 16.4 cables, with multi-pins in the mixer case?” So, I bought another 16.4.2 multi-core cable to make a total of 40 channels.
I keep my StudioLive 24.4.2 in a Thon mixer case, from Germany. This case was made for the SL and it fits perfectly. Nice thing about this case is the “semi” doghouse configuration. This gave me room to mount the multi-pin connectors in the case. It took me a week or two to make all the connections and to change connectors of the second stage box. Stage box one has 16 inputs and four outputs (A, B, C, and D). Stagebox two has eight more inputs, all 10 aux outputs from the mixer (with Neutrik combo sockets) and two more outs, E and F. This all gives us 24 inputs on the StudioLive and 16 outputs from the mixer on stage.
With our acoustic band, I only need one snake, and with the other band I use both snakes. Now we can put the mixer anywhere we like, setup time is much quicker than before and we don’t have to carry very heavy cables.
See the attached photos for the result. Maybe this helps other StudioLive users to get ideas about their set-up.

Greeting from a very happy StudioLive user!

Jan-Arend Blok

Jan’s bands:

“De Duifies” are singing Dutch songs from a very popular tv series “ja zuster nee zuster” back in the sixties in the Netherlands.
“Spoetnik” started in 1980 and plays mostly covers nowdays.
thanks and best to you too!!

MultiTracks.Com Interviews Rick at NAMM 2013 About the StudioLive 32.4.2AI!

Big thanks to MultiTracks.Com for their NAMM 2013 coverage of the StudioLive 32.4.2AI!

StudioLive Spotted at the Big Game Media Party

This just in from a friend of a friend… They spotted a StudioLive 24.4.2 in use at the Big Game’s Media Party! Thanks!