PreSonus Blog

Claim Your 342 Free Ampire Cabs

Add the cabs from the 3rd gen Ampire with the ones from the High-Density expansion pack, and you have 19 cabs.

Surprise! You actually have 342 cabs. Not all of them sound fabulous, but some do—especially if you throw a Pro EQ into the mix. What’s more, with clean sounds, the new cabs give “varitone”-like filtering effects that almost sound like you have an infinite supply of different bodies and pickups. We’ll show how to take advantage of these new cabs with Studio One’s Pro and Artist versions.

How It Works (Pro Version)

With Pro, the Splitter is the star (fig. 1). The Ampire at the top provides your amp sound (optionally with effects), but don’t load a cabinet. Split the amp’s output into two parallel paths, each with an Ampire that has only a cabinet (no amps or effects). Insert a Mixtool in one of the parallel paths, and click its Invert button.

Figure 1: FX Chain setup for Studio One Pro.

If you select the same cab for both parallel paths, you won’t hear anything, because they cancel. But with two different cabs, what they have in common cancels, while their various modeled resonances remain. This creates the sound of a different, distinctive cab. Of course, you can also play with the cab mic positions to generate even more possible sounds…the mind boggles.

Finally, add another Mixtool at the output so you can increase the gain. This compensates for the reduced level due to one path being out of phase. If you want to add a Pro EQ (recommended), insert it before the Mixtool.

 

How It Works (Artist Version)

Fig. 2 shows how to set up busing to do this in Artist, although Pro users might prefer this option because the editable elements are more exposed.

  • The Ampire in the PRS Green channel (which has an amp only, with no cab) has one send that goes to Bus 1, which has a cab-only Ampire.
  • Another send goes to Bus 2, with another cab-only Ampire, as well as a Mixtool to invert the phase.
  • The Bus 1 and 2 outputs go to the FX3 channel, which sums the standard and out-of-phase cabs together. The FX3 channel also has a Mixtool to provide makeup gain.

Figure 2: Setup for the Artist version.

Note that if you choose the same cab for the Ampires in Bus 1 and Bus 2, and your original channel’s fader (in this case, PRS Green) is all the way down, you should hear nothing due to the cancellation. If you hear something, either the sends to the buses, the bus levels, Ampire output controls, or mic settings are not identical for the two channels.

But Wait—There’s More!

The composite cab sound in the FX3 bus can often benefit from adding a Pro EQ before the final Mixtool. Typically you’ll roll off the bass, or make the treble less bright, depending on the cabs. And again, let me remind you to try this with clean sounds—it’s sort of like out-of-phase pickup wiring, but with hundreds of options.

One limitation is that there’s no way to change cabs with a control panel knob or with automation. To explore the various sounds, choose a cab for the Ampire in one of the buses, then run through the cabs in the other bus’s Ampire. Some sounds won’t be all that useful, others will be distinct and novel, and some that don’t appear to be useful at first come into their own with just a touch of EQ.

Want an audio example? Sure. This combines the VC 20 and with an out-of-phase British II, with a little low-frequency rolloff. The Open Air reverb uses an impulse from my Surreal Reverb Impulse Responses pack. You’re on your own for checking out the other 341 combinations!

When you find a combination of cabs that works, write it down—with this many cabs to choose from, you might not find it again.

 

  • Yes, IRs are just as eligible for sonic mangling 🙂 In fact I use this parallel cab technique with Helix (1,599 cab possibilities!), and make IRs of the ones I really like for use in Ampire.

  • Mark Holden

    Absolutely well said. Also I’m assuming if you do have IR’s of other cabs this process can be used with those also just replace Ampire (or just one instance of Ampire) with the IR loader your using for more possibilities.

  • jangdong

    Where does the distant horizon take my heart,
    Waves rush to coincide, pushing May to fall in love for the first time
    Never allowed to think, I don’t let myself hurt. But deep inside my heart is constantly dripping blood.. slope unblocked :< <3

  • Bill Brown

    Fair, and thanks for the info, looking forward to trying this out

  • No, you shouldn’t feel stupid! I was hoping people would chuckle when they realized all these cabinets already exist in studio one. You just have to put two in parallel, and throw one out of phase. But I have to keep remembering that humor doesn’t always translate well in a text-only medium.

  • That’s fine it all you want is samples of cabinets that already exist. Creating cabs no one has heard before takes a little more effort.

  • Per Egil Mæland

    So now we should feel stupid..? Headline says “Claim your 342 Free Ampire Cabs”! I understand how this works now, but it’s not something we can “Claim” is there….?

  • Charles M. Leake

    Happy for the shared information. Sad that we were actually expecting a new download.

  • Jason Roberson

    That is brilliant! Way to think outside the box!

  • Scrollkeeper

    Or just download the tons of free impulses available, or sample your own, and don’t waste your time on this.

  • Craig Anderton

    Well, any of the other titles I came up with were super-boring, and overly long. But at least it is true there are 342 free cabs lurking within Ampire! I’m pretty jazzed with some of the sounds.

  • Baz Hood

    Wow! That’s magic!

  • Bill Brown

    Oh I get it. Clever or rude, either way you got me.

  • Bill Brown

    I dont understand any of this.

  • Kozmyk

    Aah ! Yes, no I didn’t get that it was intentional …
    I understand it all now, some of it 😜

  • The point IS to create cancellation, that’s what makes the unique sound. Otherwise, you just have two cabs in parallel. Guess I didn’t explain this whole thing very well – bottom line: Take two cabs. Put them in parallel. Flip phase on one of them. Sum them in mono. Result: Very different sound than either cab by itself.

  • Kozmyk

    A quick bit of polarity swapping would stop the cancellation wouldn’t it ?

  • Jakob Jørgensen

    Cool

  • Sorry if it was confusing! The crucial section is “If you select the same cab for both parallel paths, you won’t hear anything, because they cancel. But with two different cabs, what they have in common cancels, while their various modeled resonances remain. This creates the sound of a different, distinctive cab. Of course, you can also play with the cab mic positions to generate even more possible sounds.

  • jp55

    i thought it was just me.

  • CT Stump is right. I came up with that number because each of the 19 cabs can have 18 variations, so 19 x 18 = 342. Have fun!

  • CT Stump

    Its in the article, not a download, a way tweak existing cab responses.

  • Aziz Alami

    Where can i actually download these free cabs? i can’t seem to find them anywhere!