PreSonus Blog

Tag Archives: Studio One


StudioLive RM16AI Real-World Field Test by John Tendy

Check out this two-part video from John Tendy detailing his use of the StudioLive RM16AI to mix and record a real gig, and then take home the recordings to do a quick (and I mean quick) mix in Studio One!

This is a great no-frills, real-world look at the practicality and power of the StudioLive RM16AI. Tremendous thanks to John for his work on this and support of PreSonus! We appreciate you.

Studio One 3 Professional Wins Software Award at NAMM2016

Studio One Award

Big thanks to Music and Sound Retailer for this recognition at NAMM 2016. While the award bears MSR’s name, Studio One 3 Professional was chosen by music dealers who voted it to be the best of the year. We’re honored, and you all are too kind. To learn more about Studio One 3, click here. 

 

Studio One User Sets up Shop in California Starbucks

Starbucks-Gamer-2016Ever bring your laptop to a coffeeshop to work on your music outside the house? It’s a known fact that a change of environment can do a lot for your creativity.

But check out this guy. Go big or go home, am I right? This dude set up his Studio One rig at a Starbucks in California, complete with a huge curved monitor, mixer, power conditioner, MIDI keyboard controller, computer, two cell phones, a pack of fig newtons (I think) and several Priority Mail boxes.

Anybody know this guy?

Credit to dmizz over on Reddit for posting the photo. Click here for the original thread.

Review Of The E-Instruments eBass Complete Bundle from Studio One Expert

You can get the e-bass add-ons via our online store. Click here to shop.

Now Available: Nori Ubukata—20th Century Synth Box Vol. 1

We’ve got a new Mai Tai preset collection for Studio One 3 Artist and Professional! Take a trip back in time with Nori Ubukata’s 20th Century Sound Box and rediscover the legendary analog sounds of the 70s and 80s. Famed Japanese sound designer and synth/theremin artist Nori Ubukata recreated some of the most memorable sounds by electronic music artists such as Kraftwerk, Tangerine Dream, Vangelis and Wendy Carlos. The set contains a total of 111 presets and Instrument+FX presets (adding reverb, EQ and other effects). Also included are 50 Musicloops with sound elements showcasing the best presets in musical context.
MaiTaiAddOnBoxes1024x1024_NoriUbukata2-1

Nori Ubukata boasts an impressive resume. An accomplished thereminist (there aren’t too many of those) and synthesist, Nori has been listed as one of the 1000 greatest composers in Japanese history. He’s composed hundreds of songs for television programs, commercials, and video games in Japan, and has also lent his talents to synth sound design, notably for the Yamaha GS1, their first FM synth. Most recently he has developed many synth sounds for Lady Gaga’s 2013/2015 concert tour, and is currently developing a new theremin-based original instrument.

Click here to buy it from our online store.



 

Free: Recording in Studio One Made Easy

Getting started with home recording just got a whole lot easier this holiday season. Purchase any PreSonus audio interface and register it at my.presonus.com before January first and you will receive the Recording in Studio One Made Easy course from Home Recording Made Easy.

Home Recording Made Easy will teach you on how to do everything from hooking up your hardware to your computer, recording an entire song using a modest recording studio set-up and finally mixing that song using the tools in Studio One.

This series is nearly 3 hours in length and has 10 video sections. Whether you have switched from another DAW to Studio One or if you are brand new to home recording this series is for you. This is also the perfect enhancement when giving the gift of recording this Holiday Season.

 

Already got your interface, but still want the course? Save 50% on Recording in Studio One Made Easy using this link.



 

RAVEN from @slateproaudio—Multi-Touch Control Surface For Studio One 3

How would you like to mix in Studio One using a 27″ touchscreen?

Well, now you can, thanks to Slate Digital LLC—check out the Raven Console running Studio One 3! For several months, our Hamburg team worked closely with Slate to get the best user experience out of this solution.

Learn more about it at http://www.slatemt.com

 

Live Webcast Thursday, Sept. 24: Using the StudioLive CS18AI to Control Studio One

Don’t miss this Thursday’s PreSonus LIVE: Using the StudioLive CS18AI to Control Studio One!

 

Click here to watch or sign up for a calendar reminder.

CS18AI-Webcast

Ricki and the Flash Rocks with PreSonus, Part 5

 

Ricki and the Flash poster (1)Rehearsals started on Monday, September 15. Everyone came in with instruments: Joe had already set up his drums, and the film had rented a B3 and Leslie for Bernie. Rick the Bass Player had one of his Laklands, Rick Springfield had his Gibson SG, and Meryl had a Fender Telecaster. We had backup instruments, as well, and Danelectro sent us a couple of guitars (more on those later).

Neil, Mark, and I made several trips to the 14th St. Guitar Center to get pedals for Rick Springfield’s setup, and Line 6 sent us a guitar wireless system for Meryl. The premise is that Ricki (Meryl) is trying for stardom and is currently slugging it out in clubs in the San Fernando Valley, playing every Tuesday night at the Salt Well.

Gary Goetzman is the producer of the film, and he led the rehearsals, with assistance from Neil and Mark.

We started with a basic line check; the kick drum was miked with an ATM 250. All the other drums were triggered. Joe has triggers built into his custom Drum Workshop kit, and we just plugged out of the trigger module into my Radial DI boxes. We needed to make sure we had signal; one great thing about recording with PreSonus® Capture™ is that the send is pre-fader, so the fader position on the StudioLive AI console is irrelevant; the recording software uses the input gain level you set on the head amp actuators (trim knobs). It’s a really nifty design because it allows the house mixer to change the fader levels for the live house mix without affecting the recording.

Along the same lines, once we had the guitar amp levels where we wanted them with the Radial JDX boxes, we also took a “clean” feed, plugging the guitars directly into my Radial ProDI boxes before the amplifier, in case Neil and Mark wanted to “re-amp” the guitars during mixdown.

A quick aside: I’ll bring it up again later but I want to stress that Gary and director Jonathan Demme wanted authenticity, and they got it. Every note you hear is what was played by the musicians; there are no overdubs of instruments in this movie. There were a few extra band takes for vocals because of bleed but all of what you experience in the movie is Ricki and the Flash performing as you watch.

It was a treat to watch these professionals at work. Gary took five people who had never played together in this configuration and turned them into a band. Each song got a workout. Gary kept the band focused; they worked on one song at a time until they felt they had it down. From where I sat, it really paid off; by the end of rehearsals, I felt like I was mixing a band, not a loose knit group of musicians jamming, but a real, tight band.

Steve Cook Chooses PreSonus for Seymour Duncan Project

[This just in from Steve Cook, session bassist extraordinaire!]

This music business is a funny one. We have our steady gigs, we have producers that like to call on us for different sessions, then there’s the ‘X’ factor: the random gig calls. Sometimes they are for a used car lot sale or a hot dog stand dedication, however sometimes they are from the largest pickup manufacturer in the world. I like hot dogs, and I like Seymour Duncan pickups a whole lot as well.

The voice on the other end of the phone was Kathy Duncan, the head of Seymour Duncan, and her request was a simple one: “Can you record samples of every one of our bass pickups? You have creative liberty to do whatever you like, we just need the samples to be consistent, and representative of the pickups their truest form.”

Well, that narrows it down a bit, doesn’t it?

There were a couple of hurdles to leap in order to make this happen. First, we needed to find all the instruments required in which to install the pickups. Second, I found a tech that would come to the recording sessions and basically work on an assembly line of removing and installing pickups. For example, as I tracked the first P-bass pickup, he would be installing the first Jazz bass pickups, then we’d swap instruments, and move on to the second in each type, and so on.

Where the logistics were a bit daunting, the one constant on which I could rely was my recording set up. For this project (and all my home recording projects), I run PreSonus Studio One through a couple of FireStudio Projects, controlled with a FaderPort. The Class-A preamps in the FireStudios sound amazing, and Studio One is an incredibly fluid and easy platform in which to work. The FaderPort made the whole process easy. I had controls under my left hand with a bass in my right. The finished files sound great, and I (and thankfully Seymour Duncan) were happy with the results.

The project was really a lot of fun for me for several reasons. Rarely do we get to sample dozens of pickups at the same time. As I go back and listen to the individual tracks, I have been able to pinpoint exact tones I like paired with certain instruments, and I know exactly which pickups to install in my personal basses—mission accomplished! I also liked getting to know my Studio One software and other PreSonus products more in-depth, and that I have great sounding tools at my fingertips.

Thanks PreSonus, for continuing to impress, and for keeping us Nashville musicians rockin’! You can hear the demos over at the new Seymour Duncan site.

Musically,
Steve Cook