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Tag Archives: PreSonus


PreSonus LIVE—Shoot the Club is now up on YouTube!

In this episode of PreSonus LIVE, Justin showcases the PRM1 measurement microphone and the Smaart Wizard functionality that is included in the StudioLive 16.4.2 and 24.4.2 mixers.

Learn how to use Smaart Spectra to fine tune your live rig to your environment. We also take a look at ringing out your stage monitors using Smaart features.

George Mason University Indoor Drumline Team Places in World Finals With Help from StudioLive

[This just in from Stephen G. Mark from the George Mason University Indoor Drumline. The GMUID team just placed 8th in the WGI World Championships, and we’re proud as a new mom to learn that a PreSonus StudioLive 24.4.2 lent a hand. In fact, per Stephen, the team’s performance was praised for the audio quality of their presentation. Footage of the award-winning performance is below. Running live sound for a drumline is a whole ‘nother animal than running sound for the local Journey tribute band, so I asked Stephen to share some details on the hows and whats and mics. He obliged.]

Hey PreSonus! Just wanted to let you know how things went this past weekend at WGI World Championships. We came in 8th place with a 92.25. We were the only first year world class ensemble to break 90, and the only first year group to be in the top ten, an achievement that hasn’t happened in quite a while.

After the awards ceremony I was told multiple times how our ensemble “by far had the best balance of the entire evening.” I credit being able to manipulate our sound live in aiding this accomplishment, an accomplishment that would not have been possible without the support of PreSonus.

Here’s a video of our finals performance and picture from the performer’s perspective of the 4,000+ audience who watched us perform and listened to that perfect sound that was praised about all night. That audience could definitely see what equipment that we are very proud to endorse.

We miked each marimba with two Shure SM-57 Mic’s, evenly distributed around the individual playing zones. The vibraphones were miked in a similar fashion, but we used only one mic per instrument. We also amplified our drum set, we amplified each piece of the kit, with the exception of overhead mics for cymbals—you can tell from the video that we have enough cymbal sound to fill the arena that we perform in.
 We compete in various gymnasiums and arenas from February to April. Each competition site site is extremely different from one to the next, and we are given no time in that room prior to the performance. Multiple groups compete at each competition and are only given a certain allotment of time to enter the floor, perform their show, and get off the floor. Exceeding the predetermined time frame of 11 minutes can result in a penalty. So needless to say we do not get any time for a sound check! In fact, our sound check is determined by the first notes being played in the performance. In the past, while using analog mixers, we where forced to make best guesses on how the mix would sound in that room and cross our fingers and hope that would be OK. Now the StudioLive allows us to make those best guesses and if there something wrong we can adjust levels throughout the performance.
I believe having this capability allowed us to achieve an almost perfectly blended sound that was the talk of the town after our performance.
Regards,
Stephen G. Mark

KMFDM and the StudioLive 24.4.2

Long-haul industrial band KMFDM has been at it for 29 years. On their current U.S. tour, they are mixing monitors with a PreSonus StudioLive 24.4.2. At the Baton Rouge show, bandleader and multi-instrumentalist Sascha Konietzko cited ease of use and wireless control as primary reasons to choose StudioLive.

See pics from the show over at our Facebook page!

Alt-J Relies on the StudioLive 24.4.2 in Recent Tour

[This just in from Lance Reynolds, FOH for Mercury Prize winners Alt-J!]

Well, our tour is nearing its end. We have our last show today in Denver. On most shows for this tour, we used the StudioLive 24.4.2 as a monitor desk, powering our in-ears mixes. Occasionally, we used it at front of house, and in a couple of situations it was used to its fullest as a front of house desk /monitor desk /recording interface.

For example, last week we did a promo event at KRXQ in Sacramento where about 30 lucky fans won a contest to see the band perform a few songs in a very intimate setting. The performance was captured with the PreSonus desk, while also being videotaped. After mixing and editing, the video will be posted by the radio station. Meanwhile, here’s a promo photo we shot after the performance.

Pictured left to right is Joe Newman (lead singer /guitarist), myself (FOH engineer), Gwil Sainsbury (guitarist /bassist /singer), Thom Green (drummer), Ron Sharpless (seated, monitor engineer), and Gus Unger-Hamilton (Keyboardist /singer).

A world of PreSonus product coverage from MusicStore TV at Musikmesse 2013!

Wow, MusicStoreTV really got all the good stuff from our presence at Musikmesse! Check out the videos below for coverage on our new Eris and Sceptre monitors, the StudioLive 32.4.2AI, our StudioLive AI PA Systems, and the ADL 700 channel strip!

Big big thanks to the MusicStoreTV team and Rodney Orpheus for this exceptional coverage.

 

 

 

 

 

PreSonus LIVE—Building Loops in Studio One with LoopLoft now up on YouTube

PreSonus LIVE—Building Loops in Studio One with LoopLoft now up on YouTube! This is a great video with some incredible performances, as well as some incredible drum sounds recorded at JT Studios.

Don’t forget that If you use PreSonus Studio One and want to upgrade to Studio One Professional 2, do it now! Because from April 1 to 30, 2013, if you upgrade to Studio One Professional 2 from any version of Studio One Artist or Producer or from Studio One Pro 1.x, you get The Loop Loft’s Simon Phillips Loop Library—a $79 value—for free!

Click here for more info!

PreSonus Sceptre Studio Monitors Official Release Video

PreSonus Eris Studio Monitors Official Release Video

Sweet Project Studio Mastering Master Masters Project in-Studio, in Studio One’s Mastering Project Suite

[This just in from Graham Cochrane, Grand Mixologist and WhizAdult over at The Recording Revolution. He put Studio One 2.5 Professional’s mastering features into an opinion toaster, and a few minutes later this tasty, crispy review video popped out. Dig in, but bacon is extra.]

Hey PreSonus…

Hope you are well. Just a heads up that I posted a video review of mastering in Studio One with the Project Page. Enjoy! Really enjoying working with S1 for mastering. You all have done an excellent job with this! Hope to see some of you at NAMM.

Merry Christmas,

 

Damon Humphrey, Up All Night on Studio One Professional 2.5

[This just in from Damon Humphrey, who was kind enough to offer insightful As to our run-of-the-mill Qs regarding his company, After Midnight Productions—that’s AMP, to you.]
Hey PreSonus! Thank you for giving me the opportunity to share my experiences! If you need anything, please let me know. Thanks again.
  • How and when did you get involved in music? How long has AMP been running?
 I got involved in music by accident actually, my friend—and now business partner—Sean Fields was always involved with music. He asked me how I would feel about starting up a music production company. Without any hesitation, I said yes! We came up with a plan, put together a demo, and earned enough money to go official in 2003.  I first started out doing the marketing and promotion, which led us to our first client. That’s when I got into producing!
  • What PreSonus stuff do you use?
Right now I use Studio One Professional 2.5, and I am using the PreSonus FaderPort.
  • What were you using before PreSonus, and why did you switch?
I was using FL Studio, which I still do now, ReWired, or I may track out and mix in Studio One, which I do a lot of. I’ve used Reason, Sonar and Logic as well. But feel that it is much easier to do what I want to do in Studio One without struggling to do it. To get where I want to go, there are simply fewer steps. Studio One speeds up the process.
  • What are some of your favorite features?
My favorite features? Hmm, there are too many to mention, LOL! But, I really like the drag-and-drop feature, without multiple shortcut keys. I also like being able to move around in the DAW without thinking too hard, by not having to go through several menus and sub-menus. For example, I never bothered with bussing in FL Studio, because it was too complicated. I would end up loading up plug-ins on each channel. In Studio One, setting up the bus is simple. It’s just a right click, and select Add Bus for Selected Tracks.  I can then add a single instance of the Compressor to the whole bus.  That is a definite time saver, and also works with sends. Thanks to Studio One, I now have a better understanding of the way effects chains work.
  • Any tips’n’tricks or production secrets you can share?
Well, this can be implemented in all DAWS, but, for those who have had issues with their drums not sounding punchy, and full: stacking is the key. Also, knowing how to compress and EQ with minimal settings. In other words, less is more when it comes to those type of things. Taking your time to learn the DAW without rushing is the key to getting great sound out of the software. Know that when your drums start clipping, back off a little, that will make a huge difference. ALSO—and this is a big tip I am starting to do it myself—listen to a reference mix of your favorite artist and try and get your beat or song to sound just as clear and loud as that, with out over-doing it… Keeping in mind what I mentioned before: less is more.