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Tag Archives: Percussion


BUY NOW – Seven Day Savings on Notion’s Percussion Bundle

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The Percussion Bundle is the percussionist’s toolbox.

The entire Notion Percussion bundle is a palette of drums, rhythm shakers, cymbals, noise makers and sound effects from around the globe.

Click here to shop!

The entire bundle is available in this single convenient download, or you can pick and choose from the various collections available in the bundle. Get just the sizzle cymbal, bongo, or duck call that works just right for you and your project—for 30% less!

Drums
Tenor Drum, Side Drum, Piccolo Snare, Long Drum, Bongos, Bongos w/ Sticks, and Bodhran.
The drum samples were played by Neil Percy of the London Symphony Orchestra.
(53.7 MB download)

Cymbals
Splash Cymbal, Finger Cymbal, Sizzle Cymbal, and Chinese Bo.
The cymbal samples were played by Neil Percy of the London Symphony Orchestra.
(101.7 MB download)

Effects
Hand Clap, Champagne Bottle, Church Bell, Car Horn (low & high), Siren, Thunder Sheet, Wind Machine, Lead Pipe (low & high), Flower Pots, Hammer, Lion’s Roar, Cuckoo, Referee Whistle, Duck Call, Train Whistle, and Nightingale.
The effects samples were played by Neil Percy of the London Symphony Orchestra.
(42.3 MB download)

Pitched Percussion
Tuned Gongs, Almglocken, Saw, Hand Bells, Wine Glasses, Whistling, and Whistling (Vibrato).
The pitched percussion samples were played by Neil Percy of the London Symphony Orchestra.
(148.4 MB download)

Percussion
Cuica, Ocean Drum, Log Drum 1, Bodhran, Slide Whistle, Anvil, Sand Blocks, Rainstick, Drum Sticks, Agogo (low & high), Brake Drum (low & high), Ratchet (low & high), Whip Flexatone, Vibrastick, Vibraslap (low & high), Water Gong, and Bell Tree.
The percussion samples were played by Neil Percy of the London Symphony Orchestra.
(88.7 MB download)

This offer is available now through June 7, 2020, and is offered worldwide.

Friday Tip: Percussion Part Generator

Just as we can use plug-ins to process audio, Studio One’s Note FX are plug-ins for MIDI data. They tend to be overshadowed by our shiny audio plug-ins, but have a lot of uses…like generating cool percussion parts.

This may sound like a stretch (“c’mon, can it really generate a musical percussion part?”), but the audio example will convince you. The first four measures are a percussion part created by the Arpeggiator NoteFX, the second four measures combine the percussion part with a house drum loop, and the final four measures are the house drum loop by itself—so you can hear how boring the loop sounds without the added percussion part.

 

This part was created with three conga and two bongo samples, each assigned to its own MIDI note. The initial “part” was just those five notes, each with a duration of four measures. It doesn’t really matter how long the notes are, you just want them to be continuous for the duration of the drum part. I then added the Note FX Arpeggiator plug-in to arpeggiate the notes (Fig. 1).

 

Figure 1: The Note FX Arpeggiator, set up to play different drums at different velocities.

By themselves, the standard up/down and down/up patterns tend to sound overly repetitive. The Random option (outlined in red above) helps, but then you have a random percussion part, which doesn’t relate to the music. So let’s introduce the secret sauce: automation (Fig. 2).

Figure 2: The automation lanes control Note FX parameters.

The key here is automating the Play Mode and Rate. The Play Mode automation starts with up/down for a measure, then down/up, then random for a bit more than a measure, and then down/up again. This adds variety to the part, and when it repeats, the random section creates additional variations so that all the parts don’t sound the same.

But what really adds the human element is varying the Rate. It starts off as 1/16th, but then just before the third measure starts, does one beat that starts with 1/32nd notes and ramps down over the beat to 16th-note triplets. The last three beats of the four measures uses a 32nd-note Rate so that the “robot percussion” adds some tasty, faster fills to lead into the next measure. I used down/up during these faster parts, but random can sound good too.

The final touch is Swing, which is set to around 70% in the audio example. Note how even though the drum loop is metronomically correct, adding swing to the percussion part lets it “dance” on top of the drums.

Now, here’s a very important consideration: You may look at the above and think “this sounds too easy,” or maybe “but what are the exact settings I should use?” The answers are yes, it really is that easy; and the exact settings really don’t matter all that much—feel free to experiment. Studio One’s little robot percussionist is full of surprises, and the way to uncover those is to play around with the settings, and automate them to create variations.

Finally, I’d like to mention that I have a new eBook out! At 258 pages, “How to Create Compelling Mixes in Studio One” is considerably longer than my two previous Studio One books. I’ve been working on it for the past year, and it’s finally available in the eBook section of the PreSonus shop. Check it out—I sincerely hope it helps you make better mixes.