PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: User Stories


#PreSonusFamFriday: Company Wide Quarantine Edition!

It’s inspiring to see what our customers have created during these strange days of quarantine and isolation. As soon as you open your social media accounts, one thing is certain: Creativity has thrived over the last few months. We wanted to take a minute and share some of the after-hours projects and live streams PreSonus employees have been a part of during this time. Enjoy!

 

Product Specialist and Home Studio Guru Joe Gilder recently wrote this song simply titled “April.”

 

Several PreSonus team members collaborated on this performance. Hear all about it from EVP of Product Management, John Bastianelli.

“My PreSonus family is so awesome, please check out the first of the “PreSonus Isolation Jams” – Gregor Beyerle, who lives in Germany and is our Software Product Specialist started this track and sent it to me. I was immediately excited about what he created which inspired me to add some synth effects and saxophones. I then passed it to Rick Naqvi, our SVP of sales who added those awesome guitars. Next, the track was sent to Ben Livingston who works in our inside sales department who added his funky drums. Finally, we punted the track over to Richard Gaspard, who’s in charge of our worship market, he added his “rockin'” bass guitar… and sent the files back. I then doubled this really cool riff Richard played with horns and Rick and I mixed the music and sent the final mix to Gregor who created this awesome video. Oh, this was all done remotely, in our home studios on all PreSonus recording gear. I have to say I’m really proud to work for this company especially with all the talented people! Nothing can keep us from creating music, not even this virus! I hope you all enjoy our jam!”

 

Richard Gaspard is PreSonus’ House of Worship Market Manager. He’s been at PreSonus since November 2017, and been a PreSonus user since 2002.

“My wife and I formed the duo Highs and Lows, a musical experiment of arranging iconic songs as just bass (upright and electric) and vocals (mostly her on lead and the two of us on backgrounds). The point is to create very sparse arrangements, but also songs that feature the six-string bass as a solo instrument, covering any instrumental solos as part of the recorded performance. All mics used are either PreSonus PM-2 or PX-1, and everything is recorded through either a PreSonus Studio 26 or AudioBox 22VSL. All audio is edited and mixed in Studio One 4 Professional and video shot on iPhone 11 and edited in Adobe Premier using a shot template I created in Adobe Photoshop.”

Watch their performance here and subscribe to their YouTube channel:

 

Perry Tee (aka the.real.agent.p) is PreSonus’ Artist Relations Manager and has worked for PreSonus going on eight years.

“Some guys meet their buddies on the weekend to play golf or poker. We make music while practicing Social Distancing… remotely from our separate homes using Studio One.”

Eric Levy (keyboards): Night Ranger, Garaj Mahal
Jakubu Griffin (drums): Cirque Du Soleil Zarkana, Chaka Khan, Peabo Bryson, Melissa Manchester, Pearcy Sledge, David Cassidy, Pharez Whitted
Jon Cornell (bass): SNL Band, Jackie Greene, Grand Canyon
Alex Painter (voice): Life On Mars Tribute To David Bowie, Solo Artist

 

Ryan Miller is our Global Service Manager and has been with PreSonus for four years.

“After a long six weeks of not being able to play music together as a band, After 8 decided we wanted to put together a live stream for our fans. We utilized four cameras through a switcher into OBS software for the Facebook live stream. The audio was managed with a PreSonus 32R for our in-ears, and then AVB connected to a StudioLive 16 for the Livestream audio. This was monitored and mixed on a pair of R80s by one of our own QA specialists, Seth Martin. The engagement of our fans was incredible, with over 10,000 views! Being able to bring a top-notch production was essential, and PreSonus products provided exactly what we needed.”

 

 

Ben Mullins, in US Sales has worked for PreSonus for 14 years! On the weekends you might find Ben as DJ MOON at events.

“I’ve been playing vinyl DJ sets live on social media through the AudioBox iTwo interface.  The iTwo makes it easy, as I just come straight out of my DJ mixer’s main output into inputs 1 and 2 on the iTwo. I can even use the iTwo directly into my iPhone and bypass it using a computer.  The sound quality is great. I often get compliments on just how clean my stream sounds online.”

Remembering Derek Jones

Derek Jones was a Notion fan, expert user, and PreSonus advocate who formerly managed the Notion Users Facebook Group. If you ever had a run-in with Derek on-line, it was guaranteed to be positive—we can’t even begin to count the number of people in the Notion community who benefitted from his help and patience. If you count yourself among them, please feel welcome and encouraged to say something nice in the comments.

Rest easy, Derek, and thanks for your kind time and attention. You’re already missed.


The Notion team are deeply saddened by Derek’s passing. He was hugely valued here, indeed all of our users benefited from the improvements and feedback he contributed over the years on top of the direct help he gave to users within the Notion user group he created. The hundreds of members that built up over time became a really supportive and kind online community, aided of course by Derek’s patient and positive direction. I remain very grateful for his passion for music making, and for his friendship.

Chris Swaffer
Product Manager, Notion


I am deeply saddened and shocked by the sad news of the death of a very good friend of mine, Derek Jones. He was full of grace, humility, wisdom and knowledge of music. His contribution to music production, notation software development and to the PreSonus testing community was huge and invaluable.
Personally, he was a very good and loyal supporter and friend, whose wisdom and counsel I drew upon deeply. I shall miss him most deeply. But, in mourning, I rejoice in the knowledge that I shall see him again and we will, once again, enjoy lengthy talks about audio production and education.
My thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends.
Johnny Lipsham
Jonny Lipsham Studios

Studio One in the City of Angels with Josh Cumbee!

If you’re not following PreSonus on Instagram, you’re missing out!

We post the latest things going on around the office, photos of our products in action, reviews, and we also connect with our users one on one. Most recently we connected with Singer/Songwriter/Producer Josh Cumbee from Los Angeles, CA. Josh is a diehard Studio One fan, and often shares his expertise with his Instagram following, and we are quick to share. We took the opportunity to talk to him more about his craft, Studio One, and what’s on the horizon for him.

Give us some background on yourself. How long have you been making music?

Fully professionally, it has only been about 4 years—that was the first time a song came out with my name in the credits where I had to pinch myself. I had been playing piano and guitar since I was a kid, which drew me to USC for their music business degree as I figured there was no way to make the creative side into an actual job. I started moonlighting with composing for TV backing tracks concurrently with my day job—a couple twists of fate, a lot of hard work, and a few key helping hands later and it blossomed into a full-time profession.

What do you like about PreSonus?

PreSonus to me exemplifies accessible, no-compromises quality. With a lot of brands in the audio space, you either have to shell out a lot of hard-earned cash to get a high-end product, or the budget product sounds/feels/functions like a cheap imitation of the real thing. To me, Studio One is a top-shelf program that I’d be willing to pay a lot more forthe fact that it’s priced low enough for me to recommend to my peers, shoot, even my little brother who’s getting into making music… now, that’s cool.

What PreSonus products do you use?

I’m a die-hard Studio One evangelist. I also have a tried and true Central Station in my studio that I’d guess has been rocking for a solid 400 years at least.

Describe the first time you wrote a song? Produced it?

I’m not even sure what the first song I wrote/produced would have been… but it was probably done on the ridiculous combination of Sony Acid 3 and a four-track Tascam tape recorder I stole from my dad’s electronics drawer. It was generally a misshapen cacophony of loops, poorly played guitar and tape hiss until I got into Garageband a while later in high school.

When did you first hear about Studio One?

A great producer from Nashville mentioned it to me. Pro Tools was the first serious DAW I learned, which I promptly abandoned for Logic because at the time working with MIDI was extremely difficult in PT. I had spent several years in Logic, but the updates (particularly in the GUI department) personally didn’t jive with me. Studio One was there in my moment of software weakness, and became one of very few tools I feel like I can’t live without.

What features are you most impressed with in Studio One?

Working with audio is a dream in Studio One. It is so easy to render, stretch, pitch shift, chop, Melodyne, change the BPM of the whole song at the drop of a hat… you name it. VST3 integration is a great CPU saver. The dual buffer is genius. Shout-out to those string samples. And Fat Channel. OK, someone stop me…

Any user tips or tricks or interesting stories based on your experience with Studio One?

With the stems feature being as rock solid as it is, I am a big believer in setting up your template with stems in mind—that way you learn to work within that structure and if/when it comes time to export them for a collaboration, mixer, delivery, etc., you can really take full advantage of Studio One’s built in set up for that. I think everyone should at least know how to use the routing feature in the channel editor—you’ll be surprised when it might come in handy. If you’re a Logic refugee you can bring all the .SDIR’s from Space Designer into Open Air AND the .EXS instruments into Presence, which is great if there’s sounds you just can’t let go of. Also, I built a macro that removes all unused audio files, copies all external ones to the session folder, then saves it—highly recommended. Big fan of VST3’s, they’re way easier on your CPU and cross-platform compatible if you need to move a session across OS’s.

How easy/difficult was Studio One to learn?

It’s a great cross between almost every DAW; mix window feels like PT, main window reminds me of Logic, arranger functions feel like Ableton… sort of all the best parts of each plus some sauce all of its own. Porting and recreating my key commands was a hassle, and the depth of sub-menus can be a little intimidating at first. There’s a lot of genius features but sometimes you have to dig for them! So all that to say, easy at points, hard at others, worth it… 100x over.

Where’d you go for support?

Where else? Straight to the support ticket portal (once I have exhausted the forums of course).

What features do you want to see next in Studio One?

MIDI capture to complement the existing armed audio track capture feature. Mid-side mode for pan knobs. A native Auto Tune competitor for when I’m too lazy to tune backing vocals in Melodyne. Native WASAPI driver for Windows similar to FL Studio’s (which rocks). More control over multicore/threading. Dare I say… integration with UAD Hardware monitoring just to have the option.

Any other thoughts on Studio One?

Of course, if I were starting to make music now, knowing what I know, I’d definitely start with Studio One. But personally, having to start over in a new program proved an even greater gift for my creative process. It made me rethink all of my go-tos, presets, channel strips, templates, etc., even a preference to MIDI over audio or vice versa. Of course, you get set back a week or two in productivity as you’re relearning everything, but that process of education at this stage in my career definitely took the music to the next level for me. I’d recommend it no matter how entrenched you might be in your program of choice, even if just for that.

Recent projects? What’s next for you?

Just co-wrote and produced on Adam Lambert’s latest single, Feel Something (about which I’m very excited), and also a single for a band called Flawes entitled Don’t Count Me Out that I feel really jams. I’ve got a couple other things cooking as a writer/producer that I’m stoked on but my baby is definitely my artist project, for which I’ve written and produced an album on the heels of a feature with Armin Van Buuren that did pretty well. We have an upcoming feature slated (so excited) and going to start rolling out tracks as a solo artist this year once the partnership side is finalized.

Hay Bale Studio Relies on StudioLive 32 and Studio One at Bonnaroo

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Photos by Anthony Matula

Most of time, you can find Elijah “Lij” Shaw at his Toy Box Studios in Nashville,

where the Grammy Award winner engineers and produces projects in a wide variety of musical genres. But every year, when the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival rolls around, Shaw and his team decamp for Manchester, home of the festival. There, behind the main stage, they soundproof their double-wide mobile recording trailer with 500 hay bales.

In this once-a-year Hay Bale Studio at Brigadoon—er, Bonnaroo—Shaw and his team record dozens of bands that will appear at the festival. The performances are fed to more than 40 radio markets around the USA.

JBon2

Photos by Anthony Matula

For the 2017 Bonnaroo, Hay Bale Studio offered more capabilities than ever before, as Shaw mixed on the new PreSonus StudioLive 32 Series III digital console/recorder, while his team captured the tracks and main mix in PreSonus’ popular Studio One 3 Professional DAW.

“The StudioLive 32 allowed us to bring in all 24 inputs from the recording floor, so we could record a full band. We’re recording in multitrack to Studio One using the console’s AVB audio interface, which can send and return up to 55 streams over one CAT5 Ethernet cable,” says Shaw.

Shaw mixes live while the band is performing, a job made much easier by the StudioLive 32 Fat Channel signal-processing section’s customizable user interface. “I’ve got compressors and EQ on every channel,” Shaw specifies, “and the customizable Fat Channel lets me create my own layout so I can quickly access the processing I want when mixing. I can bring in four onboard effects processors for reverb and delay, and I also patch in my outboard spring reverb. I use Tap Tempo on the mixer to ensure the timing of the delay effects works with what the band is playing.”

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Photos by Anthony Matula

PreSonus’ FlexMix feature also has proven useful. “I choose a FlexMix, and the entire mixer configuration changes and shows me what’s going on with that FlexMix,” instructs Shaw. Using the StudioLive 32’s aux sends, Shaw and team send four custom headphone cue mixes. “We send the cue mixes to the PreSonus HP4, which is a great, simple 4-channel headphone box that is really loud,” he avers. “We have two people with iPads running UC Surface software to control the monitor mixes.”

Main engineer Michael Hardesty also is equipped with UC Surface but he’s running it on a laptop. “Anything Lij can do on the mixer, I can do just as well in the software. My main goal is to set preamps and compressors and do the gain staging so I can get the multitrack feeds recorded properly in Studio One. I am also taking a print of the mix but generally I’m working with individual tracks. I also help with headphone mixes,” Hardesty observes.

With UC Surface, it’s possible to control the mixer from multiple devices at the same time. “That means you can give people different responsibilities,” Hardesty explains. “You also can lock out functions on particular devices; the iPad guys on the recording floor can only control the aux sends for the headphone mixes, while my laptop has complete control of the StudioLive 32.”

The live stereo mix goes straight to mastering engineer Joe Hutchinson. “Joe makes the radio mix sound fantastic,” enthuses Shaw. “He also uses Studio One to capture the performance in stereo. So we’re capturing bands through the StudioLive 32, mixing and mastering, and putting it out to more than 40 radio markets—all within an hour of each performance, with two or three songs for each band every hour.”

BonBon2

Thanks to the feature-packed, versatile StudioLive 32 and the power and speed of Studio One, Hay Bale Studio had entirely new capabilities at the 2017 Bonnaroo. “The customizable mixing surface, plenty of processing, wireless remote control, recording features, and ease of use let us do things we could never do at a dozen previous Bonnaroos,” confirms Shaw, “and it all sounded great. “We loved using the StudioLive 32, and we’re very happy with Studio One. Bonnaroo is a highlight of our year, and PreSonus helped make it extra special this year. We hope you’ll visit our site and check out some of the recordings!”

Watch Lij demo and show off their StudioLive 32 here:

 

For more information about Hay Bale Studio, please visit www.thetoyboxstudio.com/haybalestudio

Listen to their latest podcast from Bonnaroo HERE!

For more information about PreSonus, the StudioLive 32 console/recorder, Studio One 3 DAW, and the HD4 headphone amplifier, please visit www.presonus.com.

 

Photography provided by Anthony Matula with MA2LA Design.

Join PreSonus at Messe in Frankfurt, Even from the Comfort of Your Own Home

For those of you in the USA wondering what Musikmesse is, think NAMM—but in Germany.

Messe4 Messe12

“Musikmesse in Frankfurt is the international trade fair for instruments, sheet music, production, and marketing.” It all starts this Thursday, April 7 and runs to Sunday, April 10.

The PreSonus team will be there. Visit our booth and be one of the first in Europe to see the new Studio 192 Mobile and ULT Speakers in person! Find the PreSonus booth located at Hall 9.1 Booth F41.

At our booth, participants are invited to check out the gear, connect with us on social media, and enter to win one of five copies of Studio One Pro we’ll be giving away every day of Messe! To enter, participants must:

  1. Take a picture in our social corner–the orange corner in the photo above
  2. Post the photo to their social profiles and include the hashtag #StudioOneMesse.
  3. We will randomly select winners and will contact them directly. Follow #StudioOneMesse to see what PreSonus users are up to at the show and to congratulate the winners!

Support an Important Cause with @NothingMoreRock #IKnowJenny

Heya! Check out the deeply personal and incredible new video from Nothing More for “Jenny.” But more importantly, check out the cause. First, here’s the video:


Next, here’s the cause: Nothing More is looking to raise awareness of mental health challenges through partnerships with PledgeMusic, BringChange2Mind, The Jed Foundation, To Write Love On Her Arms, YoungMinds, and the International Bipolar Foundation.

You can support these charity partners and pick up some cool exclusive merch at the #IKnowJenny page on PledgeMusic. Click the image below to

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Winter Wonderland Raises Money for UNICEF

[This just in from Matt Chubb, who is using his StudioLive to contribute to theWinter Wonderland CD, a disc of all-orIMG_0321iginal Christmas music. 100% of the proceeds from the album will be donated to children’s rights nonprofit UNICEF.]
 
Hey PreSonus! We used the Presonus StudioLive 16.0.2 mixer recently to record our contribution to Winter Wonderland.  We recorded vocals and guitars using the StudioLive. While the vocals were miked, we ran the guitars via the DI from the amp. We set up the mixer as FireWire interface, and routed the FireWire returns to our studio monitors for mixing and mastering. Having used the StudioLive extensively in the past both live and in-studio, it has become an integral tool in my recording process!
The WinterWonderland project is a charity album in aid of UNICEF, put together by local guitar teacher James Martin, his pupils, friends, and plenty of other local talent.
Check out our page for more information and to make a pre-order. As you’ll see from the page, we are doing this all for free, and 100% of proceeds will be going to UNICEF.  We’ve got a massive variety of music, from children as young as 7 years old, to seasoned vets, including ex-Iron Maiden frontman Blaze Bayley!

Diego #GotHisHooksIn in the best way possible

As you may or may not know, we recently had a big hook-writing contest called #GetYourHooksIn, which put up the offer of an incredible recording package in exchange for a good hook. Diego entered said contest and placed third.

That said, Diego—more than any of the 300+ entrants—deserves an honorable mention. He chose to not only write and record his hook to enter the contest, but also to document every step of his process, and make the whole thing available on YouTube, for free, for the betterment of producers the world over. He covers several important topics that stand apart from the run-of-the-mill YouTube world of mixing, EQing, compression, etc. Instead, Diego focuses on topics like lyric writing picking the right singer for the song, and the importance of the first listen.

Check out the playlist below, as there’s clearly been a lot of time put into this and there are some wonderful tips in here. English speakers can turn on subtitles by clicking the CC button near the bottom right of the video player.

Here’s is Diego’s final entry:

If you’d like to hear the winning entries of #GetYourHooksIn, click the following links:

 

30 Day Worship Sound Tools #23: Tips for Recording 1

Doug Gould of WorshipMD suggests some handy tips for recording your services.

For info on the StudioLive AI digital mixers, click here.

For more from Doug Gould and Worship MD, click here.

 

Behind the Scenes of the New PreSonus Headquarters

On April 30, 2015, we formally christened our new headquarters in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with one heck of shindig.

This video, screened at said shindig, contains  a selection of interviews with some of the luminaries who had a hand in the creation of our new home, including Mayor Kip Holden, architect Scott Ritter, and more—along with some of the regular cast of PreSonus characters. There were a few architectural challenges inherent in peppering a few office spaces around a world-class recording studio core, but the team really pulled it off.

Thanks to everyone who made this possible. This is a great home.