PreSonus Blog

Tag Archives: Studio One


Jody Whitesides is Kicking Butt with Studio One

[This just in from Jody Whitesides, accomplished singer/songwriter/composer/PreSonus devotee…]

Once in a while I’m asked, “What would you consider you’re best piece of music?” I would have to go out on a limb and say there’s no way to choose which of my creations is my best, much like a parent can’t choose between their kids. I have to let others make that choice. Those choices are what happens when music I’ve created is used to help support other’s creations in TV,film, or games.
I’m fortunate to be getting a lot of placements and uses of my “children,” or as most would call them: songs! Getting to that artistic end result and making what I hear in my head a reality that can be shared with the world is a real pleasure. In making any song a reality, I end up using tools that I know will deliver the quality I need. The PreSonus Monitor Station is a staple in my studio. It’s vital in making it easier to get a great mix.

In the last three months I’ve had the following placements. In every single one of them, I’ve used the Monitor Station. Don’t let your creations leave the studio without using it!

NASCAR on Fox
OH Sit!
The Late Show with Craig Ferguson
Design Squad Nation
American Digger
American Ninja Warrior
Angel’s baseball
Atlanta Braves baseball
Auction Hunters
All My Children
Bang For Your Buck
Brave’s Live
Big 12 Live
Beverly Hills 90210
Brothers & Sisters
Cardinal’s Live
Cowboys Game Night (NFL)
Detroit Tigers Live
Dodger’s Live
E! News
High School Scoreboard
High School Spotlight
How I Made Millions
Lonestar Conference Showcase
MLB Tonight
NASCAR Raceday
On The Fly
One Life To Live
One Tree Hill
Rangers Insider
Rangers Live
Samsung Mobile 500 Preview Show
Selection Sunday 12
Sportsday NFL Draft Special
Sportsday On Air
The Rundown
Tigers Live
Veronica Mars
World’s Strictest Parents

hearjody.com

jodywhitesides.com

Rob Seifert Gage Sounds off on PreSonus

[This just in from Rob Seifert Gage, producer/engineer and owner of Audio Evidence Mobile.]

As an independent engineer/producer since the pre-DAW era, I had the opportunity to see the development of the modern-day DAWs. Some had all the bells and whistles but sounded terrible. I have learned so many through the sessions I’ve worked, and I am so excited about PreSonus Studio One 2.5 ! The sound of 64-bit processing and the extensive native plugins  put a smile on my analog face every at session.

Every project on my Audio Evidence Mobile studio is different day by day.  As a producer and as a live sound engineer, I work with singer-songwriters and full bands. I archive every show and edit each performance into stems for the client. Studio One has made the process so fast and easy. I use the F keyboard command to separate at cursor, and I can move so quickly to the end of the performance that I can sell CDs within minutes at the end of a show. In other DAWs it took a few bounces to disk to get the same task done. One great thing about PreSonus is that when I first downloaded Studio One version 1.0, this feature was not included—but PreSonus is hip to what is needed and with each update they give us what we need!
As an engineer, I love the sound. My studio is a hybrid analog/digital space allowing me the use of my outboard gear using Pipeline Stereo in Studio One. All my effects are outboard, and my main outs are going into either a

Requisite Audio Y7, or a Universal Audio 2-610 if I need EQ. Then I combine into and monitor through a Dangerous Music D-Box, which is a great tool, but Studio One is doing most of the work.
I use samples and tempo mapping a lot in my work, and in Studio One it’s so easy. It allows the programmer to create tracks that sound like a supercomputer tempo or a human—and combining the two does the trick for me!
PreSonus Studio One is fast, fun, and simply the only DAW for me.

 

PreSonusLive—Using Studio One Plug-ins Live, Now up on YouTube!

PreSonus LIVE airs Thursday! Using Studio One Plug-ins for Live Shows

PreSonus LIVE Airs Thursday | Using Studio One Plug-ins Live | 2 p.m. CST / 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST / GMT -6

Join Justin Spence as he presents a few tricks on using plug-ins in Studio One at your live shows. 

Joey Stuckey Relies on PreSonus for his Critically-Acclaimed CD, “Mixture.”

Joey at board 3

[This just in from Joey Stuckey, Macon, GA’s highly-decorated jazz (and more) guitar virtuoso. He recently sent us a kind e-mail about his experience with PreSonus and updated us on some of his latest projects.]

Hey PreSonus!

My new CD, Mixture, was recorded with Studio One 2.5, has spent five weeks on the CMJ top 40 charts, peaking at number 9 alongside other jazz greats like Lee Rittenour, Chick Corea, Marcus Miller and Diana Krall. We’re getting many great reviews!

One of the powerful tools we used in producing this record is the PreSonus  Studio One. My co-writer and co-producer Tom Rule used Studio One for his demo keyboard tracks at his home studio. When we brought the tracks in to my pro studio, Shadow Sound Studio, to finish adding real instruments and mix and master, I fell in love with many of the sounds included with of Studio One. In particular, we loved the stand-up bass sound that shipped with Studio One so much, that we actually left it on the record and never had a live bass player come and replace the MIDI. I have now made Studio One part of my studio tools and of course use PreSonus for my jazz band’s live performances.

I just can’t say enough about Studio One—it is so affordable, the workflow is great, and again, the stand-up bass is really something. I hate to say this to stand-up bass players, but they are probably out of a job—at least at my studio! All the PreSonus gear is so affordable and provides many features that gear triple its cost doesn’t provide, I can honestly recommend PreSonus to all my friends and colleagues.
Joey Stuckey Stuckey Review

Making Of AMO + NAVAS rework for David Penn pres. Kadoc – The Night Train

How to Sell Music on SoundCloud

UPDATE: We’ve got a killer new video on this very subject. The original blog post follows after this video:

 

SoundCloud_MoneyAs a Studio One user, you’re well aware that SoundCloud® has rapidly turned into the “YouTube of music discovery.” We’ve offered the capability to upload directly to SoundCloud from Studio One since version 1.1, and chances are, you probably already have music available for streaming from your SoundCloud account.

Streaming is nice, but did you also know that you can add a “buy” button to your SoundCloud player? All you need is music available for sale in your free Nimbit account, and you’re ready to sell to the millions of fans who listen music on SoundCloud every day.

Hmm…SoundCloud and Nimbit, what a coincidence… Starting with version 2.0.6, Studio One can now also upload your music to Nimbit.

Here’s how to add “Buy” buttons for your songs on SoundCloud that are available for sale on Nimbit:

1. Get the deep link for the track you want to sell from your Nimbit store by visiting your store, clicking the share button between the play button and track name, and copying the link that appears.

SoundCloud_Money

2. Now, go to your track on SoundCloud that you want to sell, and click the edit button. It looks like a Pencil.

SoundCloud_Money

3. On the “Info Page That Loads” click “Show More Options”
SoundCloud_Money

4. Paste your Nimbit Link in the “Buy link” field

5. Your SoundCloud Player will now display a Buy Button, check it out below. I’ve embedded the actual player for the track I used in this demo so you can see for yourself. For the purpose of the demo, I set the price for this track to free, but you can set the price in Nimbit to whatever you want or to “Name Your Price” to let fans pay what they want.

Don’t have a Nimbit Account? Sign up now for Nimbit Free to start selling and promoting your music today.

Watch the video below to learn more about Nimbit.

Using the MPC Renaissance to Control PreSonus Studio One Transport

Check out this killer video from mecprosound over on YouTube! He just uploaded this tutorial on setting up the Akai MPC Renaissance controller to control transport in Studio One like a boss.

 

Bill Edstrom, and Why He Chose to Write a Book on Studio One.

Studio-One-book[This just in from Bill Edstrom, Pro Audio Author and all-around gem of a man.]

Hey PreSonus!

I’ve done projects in just about every DAW on the market. To use most of these systems you need to be in a very technical frame of mind. About three years ago, I was looking for something simpler—something to get creative songwriting ideas out. That’s when I discovered Studio One. The workflow made sense to me and it helped me write.

As I got more interested in Studio One, I discovered anther great thing—a community of users that were amazingly helpful and enthusiastic. I started contributing to the PreSonus Forum with some free YouTube videos which lead to my work with Groove 3. I went on to create four volumes (24 hours worth!) of video training for Studio One.

When I started talking to Bill Gibson at Hal Leonard about some book concepts, I really wanted to do a Studio One book. I think they see the potential for this DAW because they have already published Larry the O’s book Power Tools for Studio One with a second volume on the way.

My book is designed as concise introduction to the core features of Studio One. I wrote it for the person that already has some experience with another DAW. The book content is really focused on getting up to speed with the software as quickly as possible. There are also 12 new videos included with the book covering some of the key concepts that would be tricky to explain in writing.

Why Studio One? Well, besides being great software, PreSonus has been amazing to work with. I have had the chance to meet Matthias and the PreSonus Software team at PreSonuSphere and NAMM and they have been very welcoming. The rest of the PreSonus team including Rick, Jonathan, Brad, and Jim have been friendly and great hosts in Baton Rouge. I also really enjoyed presenting to a group of Studio One enthusiasts as part of PreSonuSphere 2012 last year.

At first, I was recording with Studio One as a canvas for creativity. But I realized that I could produce music end to end without really needing to use other tools. Back in March 2010 I put together my first rather crude Studio One video called “Fun With PreSonus Studio One.” That video has 42,000+ views. I think the title sums up my experience with Studio One. It’s fun to use!

Regards,
Bill Edstrom

You can (and should) get Bill’s book from the following retailers:

Powell’s
Barnes and Noble
Amazon

 

Olesya Star’s Unusual Duet

olesya_star_christmas2012[This just in from PreSonus Artist Olesya Star, who recently completed an unusual duet.]

As an independent artist, people always tell me that to survive you have to take 2 steps left whilst walking forward or you’ll go in circles, so I always keep an open mind to new ventures, avenues and pathways through this minefield called the music biz. One such diversion presented itself to me recently in the form of a country duet, originally meant for Dolly Parton, but sung by Tim Rose. Tim was an original American troubadour who was a founding Greenwich Village folk musician in the 1960s, and former band member with the likes of Mama Cass (Mamas and Papas), and later in life Andy Summers (The Police) and Mick Jones (Foreigner). Sadly, I never met Tim Rose before he died in 2002, but by pure chance I was asked by an old friend of Tim’s  if I would supply “Dolly Parton-like vocals” and work the track, originally recorded in 1988.

The tracks were originally recorded on 2″ tape, so the tape needed to be baked and digitized prior to landing on my studio desk. I had 24 tracks to play with that had been encoded at 24bit/96khz, which I brought immediately into PreSonus Studio One Professional v2.  The job of identifying the microphones that were used in the original recording was completely irrelevant with Studio One, as it was far simpler just to make the recording sound how it should by using the simplest included Studio One features: Channel Strip, CompressorPro EQOpenAIR reverb and, my favorite by far, the Mulitiband Dynamics effect on the Master channel which glues the track together—sometimes much better than using summing mixers that cost in the thousands.

I recorded my vocals through the PreSonus AudioBox 1818VSL, dropped the majority of unnecessary channels/recordings, and sculpted a rough mix before handing the final session over to my producer/mastering guru, Adam Mills. Adam  added some heart-poundingly heavy kick drum and a sprinkle of the missing magic by adding just 2-3% OpenAir in the Mastering/Project section of Studio One, as an insert, with a tight room preset— and no more pre-delay than 15-20ms. There you go, now I’m even handing out secrets!

The result is “You Can Hurry Darling (And I’ll Walk Slow)” which now sounds like I was in the room with Tim Rose at the same time, All thanks to Studio One and PreSonus. Here’s a sample, the full single drops Feb. 14!