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Tag Archives: Studio One


DJ Craig Wood Finds Faderport, Creative Utopia Follows

Ain’t no party like a Craig Wood party

[This just in from DJ Craig Wood, thorough wordsmith and PreSonus advocate. He recently got a FaderPort, and apparently it has changed his life. I recommend going to the kitchen for a minute and making a sandwhich, as in the Twitter-era, this is War and Peace. Not to mean it’s long. I mean it’s a literary classic!]
Hey PreSonus! Below you’ll find my review of the omnipotent controller that is the PreSonus FaderPort. Feel free to publish, post, tattoo, etc!
Having spent several years working “in the box” with Apple Logic 9, my production partner began to view it as a bit of stagnant piece of software in terms of both its functionality as well as its ability to get our creative juices flowing. We decided to jump ship to PreSonus Studio One after having been told by many of our colleagues that we’d be in for a treat. To sweeten the deal, the timing of our new purchase coincided with a PreSonus promotion offering a FREE FaderPort. After spending many hours over the course of a week with this baby, I’m wondering how I could ever live without it.
After many years of hands-on time playing guitar and DJing, there’s nothing I appreciate more than being able to incorporate a bit of tactile response within my little basement studio setup. There’s something refreshing about being able to press the keys of my MIDI keyboard, hit the pads on my Maschine MK2 or turn the knobs of my beloved Virus B module. PreSonus’ FaderPort has certainly found a spot in my “Hall of Things to Touch in a Non-Creepy Way.”
Installation
What installation? Seriously. I simply connected the USB and AC power and I was running! I couldn’t get any easier than this. In the interest of full disclosure, I didn’t try FaderPort with my other DAWs, Ableton Live 9 and Logic 9/10… and why would I? Studio One is the sh*t! But I digress.
On the Surface
The controller itself is easy enough to figure out, and comes with the essentials which I will conveniently breakdown in bullet-point fashion to prevent a wall of text from forming:

  • A touch-sensitive, silky-smooth motor-controlled (YES, motor-controlled!) fader that makes about as much noise as rubbing your hands together (you’re doing that right now, aren’t you?).
  • The standard array of transport/channel buttons (Play, Mute, Solo, etc.) in addition to a bonus “User” button to define your own actions and a “Shift” button to obtain secondary functionality with the transport buttons.
  • A row of buttons dedicated to quickly access different window views (goodbye “F” keys!).
  • A row of buttons dedicated to navigating the tracks of your mixer…that consequently results in your motorized fader adjusting to match the volume of the respective track. In other words, less screen starting and more fader moving!
  • An “endless” pot control for the respective track channel’s balance.
In Practice
Let me make this perfectly clear: if you own Studio One, you need to own FaderPort. Personally, I like to work fast when inspiration strikes. Being able to keep one hand on my trackpad with the other hand on FaderPort has me working at speeds that would make the Flash bow his head in shame. The ability to quickly access interface windows and physically adjust the volume on any given track is an incredible time-saver. The buttons have a satisfying”click” to them.
Parting Words
While reading this review you may feel as though my tone is a bit shill. I assure you I’m no salesman, just an excited music maker who has taken a strong liking to a simplistically brilliant piece of hardware that works straight out of the box. By eliminating the need to constantly hunt for keyboard shortcuts, I can apply that time saved to the one thing every producer–no matter how famous–strives for: more opportunity to be creative.
About the Guy Who Wrote This
Craig Wood is a nerd who has surrounded himself with technology and music throughout his 32 years on this Earth. He’s one half of the EDM production group that goes by Stepchild. (Shill: Debut EP available on Heavy Artillery Recordings!) He enjoys heavy basslines, drop-kicking mannequins, and writing review bios in the third person. He will not rest until he unleashes his revenge against the six-fingered man.

Scott Szeryk’s “Celtic Rainbow,” Live at the Aeolian Hall

[This just in from Scott Szeryk!]

Hey PreSonus, I hope all is going well!!  We have just released out latest live video “Celtic Rainbow,” all recorded at the Aeolian Hall, in London Canada, June 8, 2012. on Studio One and the StudioLive 24.4.2.
Here is some insight as to how we recorded our show, “Live at the Aeolian Hall.”

We multi-tracked the entire show via the Studio Live 24.4.2 into Capture.  Great care was taken on ensure that the instrument sources all sounded top notch (drums, bass, guitar, keys) and appropriate mics and DIs were used to capture the sounds of the instruments.

Drum mics were as follows:

  • AKG D112—kick
  • Shure SM 57s—snare top and bottom
  • Shure KSM 32’s—toms
  • Shure KSM 137—hi-hat and ride
  • AKG 414s—overheads

For post-production (mixing and mastering) we used Studio One, and things were kept pretty simple as the performances and sounds were good at the source.  I’m not a “fix it in the mix” type of engineer, so the sounds have to be great to begin with. Also we didn’t use any drum samples whatsoever. The drums sounded great and basic EQing (cut some of the boxey mids) and slight compression (just a hint, 2:1 with slow attack to keep the bass response) were used on the drums, and that’s it. Guitars were plugged straight into the Fractal AXE FX2, bass and keys ran DI.  The XMAX preamps on the StudioLive are so good that it helped the mix come together pretty quick!

Guitar Manifesto can be purchased by clicking here.

Studio One Courses and Methods from MusicEd.PreSonus.com

Studio One Courses and Methods from MusicEd.PreSonus.com

There’s nothing short of a wealth of resources online for learning about Studio OneJohn Mlynczak recently compiled this great list of online educational resources from Lynda.Com, Groove3, Berklee School of Music, and more. It’s also available on MusicEd.PreSonus.Com, but we thought the whole PreSonus community should be aware of ’em as well.

There’s some great  info here that is available in many platforms, including books, videos, and entire online courses. These include options for every user, regardless of your level of experience with Studio One. Maybe you’re a seasoned producer who’s looking to dig deep? Perhaps you recently upgraded Studio One and want to learn more about the new features you’ve gotten access to?  Maybe you’re just starting out? No matter your level of experience with Studio One, there’s valuable information in here for you!

Courses


Up and Running with Studio One® (lynda.com)

Studio One Version 2 Explained (Groove3.com)

Studio One Version 2 Advanced (Groove3.com)

Studio One 101: Songwriters and Musicians Toolbox(macProVideo.com)

Studio One 102: Producers and Engineers Toolbox (macProVideo.com)

Studio One 103: Advanced MIDI Toolbox (macProVideo.com)

Studio One 104: Mixing and Mastering Toolbox (macProVideo.com)

Free PreSonus® Video Tutorials (Obedia.com)

Recording and Producing in the Home Studio (Berklee Online)

 

PreSonus LIVE Airs Today! 2 p.m. CST / 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST / 19:00 GMT

Come join us on PreSonus LIVE today and learn the basics of Studio One!
http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive

#TeamPreSonus Collaboration: @BSWorship and @RayManuelMuzik

[I noticed a jovial exchange between two of our most vocal advocates on Twitter, @BSWorship and @RayManuelMuzik. Both are diehard Studio One junkies, and in discussing our software via Tweet, the two decided to collaborate on a remix of Brandon Scott’s “Do You Love Me?” The original track and remix are both available here for your listening pleasure, and the two artists were kind enough to spare a couple paragraphs about their experience.]

Brandon Scott:

“So, what happened was Ray heard my song “Do You Love Me” thought he could do a killer remix on the song that I could add as a bonus track to the EP coming out July 4th. We met on twitter through PreSonus releasing my new endorsed artist article. I listened to what Ray was doing himself in Studio One and thought, “I don’t listen to much Latin music, but his stuff is really good and sounds great! If he wants to have a go at making a remix of one of my songs, then I’d be honored to have him be a part of it!” So, we started talking more and more via Twitter (I never have met him in my life, FYI) and just hit it off. I stemmed out the mixes of each instrument for my song, dropped it in DropBox and he was good to go. Studio One makes online collaborating so easy it’s sick! I love how simple it is to send files to others around the world to collaborate on amazing music!  Music is what we feel, it moves us, and Studio One is the software that will move you into making amazing music with others around the world. It really is the game changer to music as we know it.”

Here’s Brandon’s original song:

 

RayManuel Perez:

“Brandon is pretty much in the ball park! We became friends because of how much we love Studio One and became good Twitter friends— its all about #TeamPreSonus! We decided to collaborate and make something crazy happen since sharing session and stems with Studio One is so easy. Studio One is the best DAW because we can do everything in one place;  producing,  recording,  mixing, mastering, and beyond—even uploading the music to the Internet! I actually got rid of all my other DAWs. Brandon and I just became PreSonus buddies and we are happy to share our music, our talents and our culture, using Studio One as our platform to make it happen! Like Brandon says, Studio One is a game changer. It definitely changed my approach—and speed—to making music.”

 

Here’s RayManuel’s remix:

PreSonus LIVE: Delays in Studio One is now up on YouTube

steadyb checks out all the diverse delay options in Studio One, including Groove Delay, Analog Delay, and Beat Delay. You won’t believe some of the sounds you can get out of these effects!

http://studioone.presonus.com/portfolio/beat-delay/
http://studioone.presonus.com/portfolio/analog-delay/
http://studioone.presonus.com/portfolio/groove-delay/

#TeamPreSonus Spotlight: Rhett Mouton!

 

[We decided it best to give some recognition to our more vocal advocates—and what better way than via a blog series?]

Who are you, where are you, and what do you do? 

Rhett Mouton: Producer, engineer, writer/composer.

How were you introduced to PreSonus?

Years ago I was asked by a young band to go to their rehearsal studio to help them record a song. That rehearsal studio turned out to be in Jim Odom’s back yard.

What PreSonus software/hardware do you use and for what purpose?

I use the Central Station for monitoring, ADL 600 for obvious reasons, StudioLive 24.4.2 for live sound and multitracking, Studio One 2 Professional for writing, composing, producing, mixing and mastering.

What’s so great about PreSonus, anyhow?

They always seem to be thinking a step ahead of the curve when developing new products.

What’s the last big project that you worked on using PreSonus gear?

I produced, mixed, and mastered a band called Meriwether’s debut album titled, “Make Your Move” which resulted in a distribution deal and record deal with Suretone/Interscope records.

What are you working on now—or next?

I am currently mixing and mastering projects for clients. I am also composing/writing original music with the intention of licensing for placement in film, television and video games.

Where can our readers learn more about you online?

rmmaudio.com

Facebook.com/rmmaudio

Facebook.com/rhettmouton

Mastering with Stock Plugins in Studio One from @RecordingRev!

Good old Graham. We can always count on this guy to create some of the best audio tutorials available online. This time around, he’s created a pair of videos focusing on mastering in Studio One using stock plug-ins, including Studio One’s Compressor and ProEQ. Watch and learn!

Compression:

 

ProEQ:

 

 

Voting is open for the “Why I Switched” video contest!

Voting is open for the “Why I Switched” video contest! Pick your favorite, the winner gets a StudioLive 16.0.2 and Studio One Professional.

Click the link below and then scroll down to check out the submissions. If you entered the contest, thank you. We got a ton of really incredible submissions. Please share this link with your friends and start watching your votes roll in!

https://www.facebook.com/PreSonus/app_214224245382377

Mixing in Studio One with third-party plugins and without!

Check out these incredibly thorough videos from Vision Studios’ David Vignola and Home Studio Trainer’s Johnny Geib!

These guys have teamed up to create an exhaustive video series illustrating the differences and similarities between mixing with Studio One‘s native plugins as compared to mixing via third-party plug-ins. Many users have asked questions about which approach is superior, including “Is it even necessary to purchase third-party plug-ins, given the quality of native plugins available?”

To answer this question, these guys took two different approaches to mixing the same exact song, (Jordy Searcy‘s “Fences”) both using Studio One. David is using third-party plug-ins, and Johnny is using Studio One’s native plugins. David’s series is a synopsis of his approach after the actual mixing was completed, while Johnny’s series shows us a step-by-step walk-through of his entire mixing process. You will see and hear their different styles, methods and approach to this song. Enjoy and share your thoughts in the comments!

David’s videos: Mixing using third-party plug-ins only:

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

 

Johnny’s videos: Mixing using native Studio One plug-ins only:

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

Part 4:

Part 5:

Part 6:

Part 7: