PreSonus Blog

Tag Archives: Studio One


Buy Eris E5 or E8 monitors, get Studio One Artist Free!

The reviews for our new Eris monitors are pouring in, and, well. We’re happy. Currently the Eris speakers are enjoying a five-out-of-five AVERAGE user scores at Guitar Center AND Sweetwater, and we just can’t help but feel like celebrating. History has shown that the best way to share that celebratory spirit is to give away free kick-ass stuff. In this case, it’s Studio One Artist. Don’t forget to grab the free 2.6 update when you install it!

From a couple of days ago until March 31st, you’ll get Studio One Artist FREE if you purchase a Eris E5 or E8 monitors. This offer is available worldwide.

All you need to do is get your monitor(s), and visit the brand-new my.presonus.com and register them. The download link for Studio One Artist will appear in your account. Note that you will only receive a single copy of Studio One per pair of monitors purchased.

Some readers prefer user reviews, others want to know what the pros have to say. Well, here’s a bit of that:

  • PreSonus has a reputation of making great products “for the rest of us,” and the Eris speakers follow that philosophy.” Jon Chappell, Harmony Central
  • Setting them up in my humble (yet effective) home studio for a few months helped me hear things I wasn’t hearing previously and helped me to provide better mixes for my clients.Eli Crews, Tape Op
  • “The PreSonus Eris E5 and E8 are quality made, well­ equipped and good-­natured active speakers for near field… Five Stars” Felix Klostermann, Bonedo.De

Bill Sage at Pro Media UltraSound on the StudioLive

[This just in from Bill Sage—Sales & Design Engineer for Pro Media Ultrasound.]

Hey PreSonus – 

I used to be a touring and recording engineer. I now design and sell AV systems. I’m a busy guy, with a full-time sales job and a marriage.  I mostly do sound for friends’ bands or benefits for charities.

Here are some reasons I am liking Studio One and the StudioLive 16.0.2. I had the opportunity to use one for a benefit a few months ago.

Running Universal Control on my Apple Powerbook, I was able to quickly get set up and my mix together in a matter of minutes. I didn’t even read the manual, and it worked flawlessly—and more importantly, it sounded great!

After the gig, I read the manual… and I had no idea that the StudioLive 16.0.2 even had iPad control, which got me even more curious. I took the plunge and bought the 16.0.2.

I also put the band back together. I am playing bass and singing, the other guys are not engineers so  I am keeping busy!  I use the 16.0.2 and Capture to record basic tracks or rehearsals. Capture is great because I only have to press Record and Stop. Capture lets me concentrate on playing, instead of engineering.

Once home from rehearsal, I import the files into Studio One. Again, it is really simple to get good-sounding tracks. The software is really intuitive, so once again I didn’t read the manual much, but I did find the videos on the internet really helpful.

I have had the “big three” recording softwares at one time or another. This by far is the simplest, most intuitive mixer and software that I have ever used.

I would highly recommend the 16.0.2 and the Studio One Software to anyone.

Cheers!
Bill Sage
Sales & Design Engineer
Pro Media Ultrasound

PreSonus LIVE Airs Today! What’s new in Studio One 2.6

Join steadyb as he shows you all the latest and greatest in Studio One 2.6! We’ve added so many incredible features to 2.6 that there’s no way he can get to them all. steadyb will cover the biggest improvements—and take your questions near the show’s end!

http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive

 

 

26 new features in Studio One 2.6

Following up last years’ “25 new features in Studio One 2.5,” YouTube genius AudioCzar put together this video celebrating 26 new features in Studio One 2.6!

Noteworthy: 2.6 came out on August 29, and AudioCzar had this video posted on the 30th. The man works fast!

PreSonus LIVE Airs Today! 2 p.m. CST / 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST / 19:00 GMT

http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive

BE THE LIFE OF THE (third) PARTY!

Free live WEBCAST!

Join PreSonus Product Marketing Manager Rodney Orpheus as he shows you some of the incredible tricks you can use in Studio One using 100% FREE plug-ins from A-list developers! Don’t miss this one!

#Webinar #StudioOne #PreSonus #FreeSoftware

New Studio One Video Course Available from AskVideo

Good ol’ Gary is at it again, this time with an exceptional, exhaustive offering of 26 (!) videos on mixing and mastering in Studio One. Head on over to AskVideo.Com to check ’em out.

A handful of them are free, but the rest will cost ya.  Totally worth it. Here’s the freebies:

The full list of course topics available follows:

Preparing a Song for Mixing
Setting Up Markers
The Mix Console
EQing Tracks
Dynamics with Compression
Reverb for Depth
Delay and Modulation FX
Sidechain Compression
Getting Deeper with Automation
Bus and Folder Automation
Bus Compression on Bus Folders
Exporting the Mixdown
Setting Up a Mastering Project
Editing Songs in the Project
Adjusting Volumes of Tracks
Adding Inserts for the Pre, Master and Post
Mastering Chain Order
Using ‘Detect Loudness’
The Spectral and Output Meters
Using Multiband Compression
Limiting Your Tracks
Disable Tracks
Dithering
Burning a CD
Images and DDP Explained
Digital Releases

 

 

 

 

PreSonus LIVE Airs Today, Aug. 15! | Sell the Show After the Show! | 2 p.m. CST / 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST / 20:00 UK / 21:00 EU

PreSonus LIVE Airs Today, Aug. 15! | Sell the Show After the Show! | 2 p.m. CST / 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST / 20:00 UK / 21:00 EU

http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive

DJ Craig Wood Finds Faderport, Creative Utopia Follows

Ain’t no party like a Craig Wood party

[This just in from DJ Craig Wood, thorough wordsmith and PreSonus advocate. He recently got a FaderPort, and apparently it has changed his life. I recommend going to the kitchen for a minute and making a sandwhich, as in the Twitter-era, this is War and Peace. Not to mean it’s long. I mean it’s a literary classic!]
Hey PreSonus! Below you’ll find my review of the omnipotent controller that is the PreSonus FaderPort. Feel free to publish, post, tattoo, etc!
Having spent several years working “in the box” with Apple Logic 9, my production partner began to view it as a bit of stagnant piece of software in terms of both its functionality as well as its ability to get our creative juices flowing. We decided to jump ship to PreSonus Studio One after having been told by many of our colleagues that we’d be in for a treat. To sweeten the deal, the timing of our new purchase coincided with a PreSonus promotion offering a FREE FaderPort. After spending many hours over the course of a week with this baby, I’m wondering how I could ever live without it.
After many years of hands-on time playing guitar and DJing, there’s nothing I appreciate more than being able to incorporate a bit of tactile response within my little basement studio setup. There’s something refreshing about being able to press the keys of my MIDI keyboard, hit the pads on my Maschine MK2 or turn the knobs of my beloved Virus B module. PreSonus’ FaderPort has certainly found a spot in my “Hall of Things to Touch in a Non-Creepy Way.”
Installation
What installation? Seriously. I simply connected the USB and AC power and I was running! I couldn’t get any easier than this. In the interest of full disclosure, I didn’t try FaderPort with my other DAWs, Ableton Live 9 and Logic 9/10… and why would I? Studio One is the sh*t! But I digress.
On the Surface
The controller itself is easy enough to figure out, and comes with the essentials which I will conveniently breakdown in bullet-point fashion to prevent a wall of text from forming:

  • A touch-sensitive, silky-smooth motor-controlled (YES, motor-controlled!) fader that makes about as much noise as rubbing your hands together (you’re doing that right now, aren’t you?).
  • The standard array of transport/channel buttons (Play, Mute, Solo, etc.) in addition to a bonus “User” button to define your own actions and a “Shift” button to obtain secondary functionality with the transport buttons.
  • A row of buttons dedicated to quickly access different window views (goodbye “F” keys!).
  • A row of buttons dedicated to navigating the tracks of your mixer…that consequently results in your motorized fader adjusting to match the volume of the respective track. In other words, less screen starting and more fader moving!
  • An “endless” pot control for the respective track channel’s balance.
In Practice
Let me make this perfectly clear: if you own Studio One, you need to own FaderPort. Personally, I like to work fast when inspiration strikes. Being able to keep one hand on my trackpad with the other hand on FaderPort has me working at speeds that would make the Flash bow his head in shame. The ability to quickly access interface windows and physically adjust the volume on any given track is an incredible time-saver. The buttons have a satisfying”click” to them.
Parting Words
While reading this review you may feel as though my tone is a bit shill. I assure you I’m no salesman, just an excited music maker who has taken a strong liking to a simplistically brilliant piece of hardware that works straight out of the box. By eliminating the need to constantly hunt for keyboard shortcuts, I can apply that time saved to the one thing every producer–no matter how famous–strives for: more opportunity to be creative.
About the Guy Who Wrote This
Craig Wood is a nerd who has surrounded himself with technology and music throughout his 32 years on this Earth. He’s one half of the EDM production group that goes by Stepchild. (Shill: Debut EP available on Heavy Artillery Recordings!) He enjoys heavy basslines, drop-kicking mannequins, and writing review bios in the third person. He will not rest until he unleashes his revenge against the six-fingered man.

Scott Szeryk’s “Celtic Rainbow,” Live at the Aeolian Hall

[This just in from Scott Szeryk!]

Hey PreSonus, I hope all is going well!!  We have just released out latest live video “Celtic Rainbow,” all recorded at the Aeolian Hall, in London Canada, June 8, 2012. on Studio One and the StudioLive 24.4.2.
Here is some insight as to how we recorded our show, “Live at the Aeolian Hall.”

We multi-tracked the entire show via the Studio Live 24.4.2 into Capture.  Great care was taken on ensure that the instrument sources all sounded top notch (drums, bass, guitar, keys) and appropriate mics and DIs were used to capture the sounds of the instruments.

Drum mics were as follows:

  • AKG D112—kick
  • Shure SM 57s—snare top and bottom
  • Shure KSM 32’s—toms
  • Shure KSM 137—hi-hat and ride
  • AKG 414s—overheads

For post-production (mixing and mastering) we used Studio One, and things were kept pretty simple as the performances and sounds were good at the source.  I’m not a “fix it in the mix” type of engineer, so the sounds have to be great to begin with. Also we didn’t use any drum samples whatsoever. The drums sounded great and basic EQing (cut some of the boxey mids) and slight compression (just a hint, 2:1 with slow attack to keep the bass response) were used on the drums, and that’s it. Guitars were plugged straight into the Fractal AXE FX2, bass and keys ran DI.  The XMAX preamps on the StudioLive are so good that it helped the mix come together pretty quick!

Guitar Manifesto can be purchased by clicking here.

Studio One Courses and Methods from MusicEd.PreSonus.com

Studio One Courses and Methods from MusicEd.PreSonus.com

There’s nothing short of a wealth of resources online for learning about Studio OneJohn Mlynczak recently compiled this great list of online educational resources from Lynda.Com, Groove3, Berklee School of Music, and more. It’s also available on MusicEd.PreSonus.Com, but we thought the whole PreSonus community should be aware of ’em as well.

There’s some great  info here that is available in many platforms, including books, videos, and entire online courses. These include options for every user, regardless of your level of experience with Studio One. Maybe you’re a seasoned producer who’s looking to dig deep? Perhaps you recently upgraded Studio One and want to learn more about the new features you’ve gotten access to?  Maybe you’re just starting out? No matter your level of experience with Studio One, there’s valuable information in here for you!

Courses


Up and Running with Studio One® (lynda.com)

Studio One Version 2 Explained (Groove3.com)

Studio One Version 2 Advanced (Groove3.com)

Studio One 101: Songwriters and Musicians Toolbox(macProVideo.com)

Studio One 102: Producers and Engineers Toolbox (macProVideo.com)

Studio One 103: Advanced MIDI Toolbox (macProVideo.com)

Studio One 104: Mixing and Mastering Toolbox (macProVideo.com)

Free PreSonus® Video Tutorials (Obedia.com)

Recording and Producing in the Home Studio (Berklee Online)