PreSonus Blog

Tag Archives: DAW]


Friday Tips: Multiband Dynamics for Bass? Yes!

I’m not one of those people who wants to do heavy compression all the time, but I do feel bass is an exception. Mics, speakers, and rooms tend to have response anomalies in the bass range; even if you’re using bass recorded direct, compression can help even out the response for a smoother, rounder sound.

Although stereo compressors are the usual go-to for bass, I often prefer a multiband dynamics processor because it can serve simultaneously as a compressor and EQ. Typically, I’ll apply a lot of compression to the lowest band (crossover below 200 Hz or so), light compression to the low-mid bands (as well as reduce their levels in the overall mix), and medium compression to the high-mid band (from about 1.2 kHz to 6 kHz). I often turn down the level for the band above 5-6 kHz or so (there’s not a lot happening up there with bass anyway), but sometimes I’ll set a ratio below 1.0 so that the highest band turns into an expander. If there’s any hiss in the very highest band, this will help reduce it. Another advantage of using Multiband Dynamics is that you can tweak the high and low band gain parameters so that the bass fits well with the rest of the tracks.

The preset in the following screenshot gives a sound like “Tuned Thunder,” thanks to heavy compression in the lowest band. To choose a loop that’s good for demoing this sound, choose Rock > Bass > Clean, and then select 08 02 P Ransack D riff.audioloop. Insert the Multiband Dynamics processor, and start with the default preset.

As with most dynamic processing presets, the effect is highly dependent on the input level. For this preset, normalize the bass loop. Then change the L band to 125 Hz, with a ratio of 15:1, and a Low Threshold of -30 dB. Mute the LM band.

With the Multiband Dynamics processor bypassed, observe the peak value for the bass track. Now enable Multiband Dynamics, and adjust the Low band’s Gain until the peak value matches the peak value with the Multiband Dynamics bypassed-—you’ll hear a big, fat, round sound that sort of tunnels through a mix.

 

Now let’s go to the other extreme. A significant treble boost can help a bass hold its own against other tracks, because the ear/brain combination will fill in the lower frequencies. The next screen shot shows settings for extreme articulation so the bass really “pops,” and cuts through a track. Again, start with the default preset but set the Low band frequency to 110 Hz or so.

The only band that’s compressed is the Mid band (320 – 1.2 kHz, with parameter settings shown in the screen shot). A bit of gain for the High Mid band emphasizes pick noise and harmonics—5 dB or so seems about right—and to compensate for the extra highs, add some gain to the low band below 110 Hz. Again, about 4-5 dB seems to work well.

When adjusting the Multiband Dynamics processor, note that you can zero in on the exact effect you want for each band by using the Solo and Mute buttons on individual stages. So next time you want to both compress and equalize bass, consider using Multiband Dynamics instead—and get the best of both worlds.

The Latest Banging Add-Ons in the PreSonus Shop!

Click here for more!

New from PreSonus – Tom Brechtlein Drum Loops

Tom Brechtlein is a drummer’s drummer—a seasoned vet with a versatile skill set that is evidenced by the broad array of talent that has chosen to work with him. Tom’s client list boasts names like Chick Corea, Wayne Shorter, Jean-Luc Ponty, Christopher Cross, and Robben Ford. So when it came time for us to make a diverse drum library that could serve nearly any need of our user base, Tom was our first call.
The result of Tom’s sessions? He pulled out all the stops: Delivering brutal rock grooves, sludgy blues, Louisiana-worthy funk, and tasty jazz and fusion licks that will quickly make this library your secret weapon.
Available in Stereo and HD Multitrack editions. Both include over 320 loops, two kits for Impact, and unique Double Drum loops for synchronized two-drummer sounds!

Get Tom Brechtlein’s Drums HERE! 

 

Continue reading

15 Things VisionRecordingCt Likes About Studio One

Big big thanks to VisionRecordingCt over on YouTube for this great opinion piece on Studio One. We use stuff like this to warm our little hearts when we run low on Cafe Louisiana Hotter ‘n Hell Hot Sauce, which is often.

Studio One 2 has won Resolution’s DAW of the Year Award for 2012!

We’re proud to report that Studio One 2 has won Resolution’s DAW of the Year award for 2012! Here’s a snippit:
“The biggest boast is the integration of Melodyne. Selecting an audio clip and selecting the context-menu item Edit With Melodyne causes Melodyne to open in the lower window area and begin the detection process. A feature missed in the earlier version was transient detection, and this has been implemented incorporating an ‘Audio Bend’ function and integrating audio quantisation and groove extraction using Studio One;s straightforward drag-and-drop methodology. Another new feature is Track Comping—looped takes each create a new hidden Layer and you can the unpack them to see all the takes onscreen, Swiping sections and promoting them to the main track can be achieve easily with mouse dragging and shortcuts.” 
Read the full article here, or download the 2012 Winners Supplement. [PDF]