PreSonus Blog

[This just in from Big Joe Daddy, PreSonus forum regular, guitarist, industrious cable-wrangler, and all-around great guy.]

Hey PreSonus, I finally got my multi-pin panel built and installed. The rack panel sits in a road case that serves as a stand for the StudioLive 24.4.2 mixer. The road case also has a power conditioner, a couple of drawers, wireless in-ear transmitter, etc, and the stage snakes are stored in the bottom of the case during transport.

The big cable on the left in the photo below feeds a fan-out to the mixer. The two smaller multi-pin cables feed 12×4 stage boxes. The XLRs are main outs, sub outs, and Auxes 9 and 10. (Auxes 1-8 are fed to the stage boxes. The mixer sits in a Gator case with the doghouse. Setup is a snap. The large multi-pin cable is stored in the doghouse for transport, so I never have to mess with plugging things in to the back of the mixer!

I play guitar in a band made up of weekend warriors like myself. We play small venues, mostly bar gigs and winery gigs, with an occasional barn party thrown in for good measure.  In addition to my guitar playing duties, I’ve also fallen into the role of ‘sound guy’, audio engineer, roadie, booking agent, transportation coordinator, finance manager, and marriage counselor. ;-) 

Since I’m not as energetic as I once was in my teens, I’m always looking for ways to simplify the transport and setup process of all our gear. We have a tandem-axle trailer with a ramp door, e-track, interior lighting, etc. It holds all our gear in road cases with casters. If it doesn’t have wheels, we burn it. We joke with folks telling them that we play for free, and that we only charge to move all the gear in and out! ;-)
Part of the burden of setting up our 5-piece band is to ensure that all the cabling is set up properly. We run with five wedges (or in-ears), a couple of mains, and a couple of subs, in addition to a full suite of drum mics, two Axe-FX II guitar rigs, keys, bass rig, etc, etc. Everything is run through the StudioLive 24.4.2.
Inevitably, especially when it’s dark, there are ‘gremlins’ that sneak their way into the setup process wreaking havoc at the last minute, typically from a cable getting plugged in incorrectly, or something of that sort. I often use gaff tape to cover any unused jacks on equipment to avoid mistakes. And of course everything is labeled.
My latest effort to help make our setup and breakdown process as easy as possible has been the introduction of a multi-pin snake system. Basically it’s made up of the following components:
  1. Multi-pin fan out snake that plugs in to the rear panel of the StudioLive, and the other end plugs into a large multi-pin connector on the rack panel.
  2. Two 12 x 4 stage boxes that connect to 35′ multi-pin snakes and also connect to the rack panel.
  3. A rack mount panel that houses all the multi-pin connectors and is mounted in a road case which serves double-duty as a rolling stand for the StudioLive mixer and case.

When we roll in to a gig, we merely open the doghouse of the mixer case where the fan out snake is stored and always stays connected to the StudioLive. We plug in the big multi-pin to the rack panel, and then roll out the two 35′ sub-snakes and stage boxes that are stored in the bottom of the road case for transport.

The stage boxes are positioned at the front of the stage and the back of the stage. This lets us run relatively short XLR cables to everything and keeps the stage clutter to a minimum. The stage boxes are clearly labeled so there’s a lot less chance of error when plugging things in.
We position the StudioLive 24.4.2 on the side of the stage next to me so I can access it if needed. I’ll do a quick virtual sound check with the iPad running a Capture recording created previously. If we’re lucky enough to have someone running sound for us, we’ll put them on an iPad. All of our monitor settings and Fat Channel settings are saved to a scene before we hit the venue, so most of the time, it’s turn it on and roll with very little tweaking.
I’ve got to give credit to Papa John of Papa Grows Funk for the ideas and guidance in putting this multipin system together. He has a similar setup that he demonstrated during Presonusphere. He took the time to answer my questions and make suggestions prior to placing the order.  All the boys in Papa Grows Funk are great guys. Many thanks.
When I got on board with PreSonus a few years ago, I started with the StudioLive 16.4.2. Instantly I was sold on the features, and ease of use, but most of all the improved sound quality over my old analogue board. Later I added the StudioLive 16.0.2 because the darn thing was so small and portable. It’s perfect for all sorts of venues when size and portability are important. Lastly, I added the StudioLive 24.4.2 to the quiver and I couldn’t be happier. The added features on the StudioLive 24.4.2, along with all the cool software PreSonus keeps releasing, makes me wonder what more I could ask for.
I’ve become extremely passionate about live sound, audio engineering, and pursuing the best possible sound quality for FOH. With the constant upgrades to the software and firmware, it’s like getting a new piece of equipment with each release. Kudos to all the folks at Presonus for such wonderful products and for listening to your customers. You’re providing incredible value to folks like me.  You’ve earned my business.
Joe “Big Daddy” Hinkens

Category StudioLive 24.4.2 | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard




Kimberly Thompson
 is a world-class musician, producer, engineer, composer, and educator whose work has included gigs with Kenny Barron, Jay-Z, Kanye West, George Michael, Alicia Keys, and Beyonce. She’s recently moved from another well-known DAW to Studio One, and says she’ll never go back.

“Everything with Studio One is crystal clear,” says Thompson. “I’m able to hear all those ghost notes, those staccato notes, all that stuff that often gets lost in the mix. It’s an amazing program—it picks up the nuances of the sticks, the depth of the snare, and the classiness of the traditional brush strokes in jazz. It nurtures my sound while I’m recording live. I don’t feel the temptation to over-use EQ anymore—in many cases I don’t use it at all.”

Studio One’s intuitive workflow also scores high marks. “It’s a really easy program to work with, whether you’re approaching it as a producer, an engineer, a musician, or all of the above,” she observes. “Studio One enables me to keep working and be more productive.”

 

 

 

Category Studio One | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Join veteran live sound guru John Mills on a journey to discover precious Smaart Wizard technologies…now available for FREE in the StudioLive 16.4.2 and StudioLive 24.4.2 digital mixers. He will be taking your questions LIVE! Click here to go to the Livestream page or receive an e-mail reminder before the show.

Category Uncategorized | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Dr. Snipe Young, decorated PreSonus Artist/producer/songwriter/engineer/bad-ass. He just wrapped his most recent track, "Shock Your Body," in Studio One, linked below for you to hear.  The good doctor was kind enough to share a bit about the anatomy of the track, and what makes it tick.]

Hey PreSonus—Let’s dig in shall we?!?! On this particular record I was going for a funk/retro/groovy groove—if that is a sound.

So here goes… I played the main groove live on my Open labs Miko, which has a FireBox 4×4 installed in it. From there I tracked it through a very old, yet warm vintage 24-channel mixer. I then sampled this recording, chopped a nice feeling groove and placed it on the Studio One timeline.

The groove is the backbone of the record, so I built around that with kicks and snares I created to give it a subtle punch and snatch. I then used the groove quantize to lock my bass from Trilian and the drums—It’s still a remarkable feature to me!

My next addition would be to play some guitar licks which were brought alive by the TriComp and Pro EQ. I also added an instance of Beat Delay and set it to echo on the 8th notes, which gives it a small stadium feeling and allows it to lay inside the mix better. Lastly, I just sprinkled on a few chords from a Komplete 8 Ultimate Vintage Rhodes organ, and Philharmonik strings and the pieces to the puzzle all tie together in the end to make a vintage-sounding montage.

We had fun creating this with Studio One Pro 2.5—a tool that a Pro uses!

 

Category Studio One | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Baton Rouge residents: PreSonus is partnering with The Blood Center for a blood drive on Monday, December 17th from 9:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. If you are interested, email jobs@presonus.com to confirm a time slot!

Please click HERE to ensure you are eligible to donate. It is important to eat a good breakfast before donating blood and be sure to bring your photo ID!

The blood mobile will be located behind the Bon Carre buildling, near the PreSonus Audio Electronics entrance.7257 Florida Blvd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70806

Category Uncategorized | 4 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



We had a few questions the other day during our live Studio One 2.5 webinar regarding use of Maschine in Studio One 2.5.

Wish we had known at the time that maschinetutorials over at YouTube had made this killer video on that very topic. Check it out!

Category Studio One | 129 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



In case you missed our webinars yesterday, here’s an archive on YouTube. Join Jonathan Hillman, Justin Spence, and steadyb and check out all the new stuff in Studio One 2.5!

Category Studio One | 6 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Continuing our series of  PreSonus LIVE webinars, we’ve got something really special planned for tomorrow, Dec. 11. Join our usual suspects as we dive deep into the new features of Studio One 2.5.

This show will be available at several times throughout the day, tune it at the time that works best for you:
http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive

10 a.m. | 2 p.m. | 5 p.m.  CST
4 p.m. | 8 p.m. | 11 p.m. GST

Category Studio One | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Siegfried Meier at the stunning Beach Road Studios!]

Pretty!

Hey PreSonus team!

At Beach Road, we use a few pieces of PreSonus gear that are in regular use each and every day. At the forefront of our monitoring rig, we use a Central Station that has a custom built PSU by none other than rad PreSonus audio dude Chad Kelly. The unit was awesome before, but has been made more awesome by this simple upgrade. We also make heavy use of a FaderPort during all of our tracking and mixing to have some hands-on control when setting up the sessions.
Furthermore, we’ve also got a mobile recording rig that is comprised in part by a pair of PreSonus Digimax LT units, which are used to capture anything from drums to guitars to vocals on our remote sessions. The mic pres in the LT’s are fantastic, (as are all of the PreSonus pres,) and pack quite a punch in such a small 1U space. A PreSonus HP4 handles all of the headphone duties, since the amps are so blisteringly loud, and the unit is über small and fits in well when trying to keep the load light on the road.
Studio One Professional 2  gets a lot of use as well. It’s used on our main rig for simple editing and mastering, as well as on our mobile rig for the same. We also keep it installed  on both our playback and recording rigs in our high-end mastering room for various tasks.

Category Uncategorized | 6 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Here’s some incredible insights on music, language, and education from 4-string guru Victor Wooten, which is served alongside his bold, harmonic-heavy rendition of  “Amazing Grace.”

Powerful stuff. When I found this I immediately watched it twice in a row.  Hope you like it as much as I do.

Do you agree with Victor’s thoughts on music education? Please post your thoughts in the comments section.

 

 

Bonus! If that’s not enough Victor for one day, here’s a video of him on the PreSonus stage at NAMM last year alongside Steve Baily and David “Fingers” Haynes at our 2011 NAMM show.

Category Just for Fun | 7 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard