PreSonus Blog

Studio One Producer Abraham Martinez Wins Latin Grammy for Danilo Montero’s La Carta Perfecta – En Vivo

Abraham Martinez

Abraham Martinez in his studio

La Carta Perfecta – En Vivo was a big record for Danilo Montero in 2014—so big, in fact, that it won a Latin Grammy for Best Christian Album. The live album was mixed by Abraham Martinez, pictured above, in Studio One Professional 2.

Martinez is a full time FOH audio engineer for Marcos Witt, a well known worship leader and music artist in Latin America. When not working with Witt, Martinez spends his spare time rackin’ up Latin Grammys. He’s collected three in only four years:

  • 2011 Best Christian Album (Spanish Language) Lenguaje De Amor Alex Campos [CanZion / MV Records]
  • 2012 Best Christian Album (Spanish Language) 25 Concierto Conmemorativo Marcos Witt
  • 2014 Best Christian Album (Spanish Language) La Carta Perfecta – En Vivo

We had the chance for an e-mail exchange with Abraham to get some additional details. While Abraham has been using Studio One—and other PreSonus gear—for a couple of years now, this is his first Latin Grammy award for a project mixed in Studio One. Abraham came into the Studio One fold the same way many users do—via PreSonus hardware.

“Back when I recorded more, I used an an M80 preamp and ACP88,” says Martinez. “More recently I’ve used an ADL 600 for tracking vocals and bass. I also use a StudioLive mixer for its audio quality and ease of use for work on our church campus. I have always associated PreSonus with value, but had never considered them a serious DAW developer until I tried Studio One!

“Now I use Studio One for exclusively for all of my mixes in my personal mixing studio, AMmix,” Martinez continues. “We also use it at our church to to record and mix our plays. The main thing that drew me toward Studio One was it’s incredibly intuitive workflow. It felt natural immediately, especially for mixing. I remember having to go back to my old DAW to finish an older project and hating it as it felt primitive in comparison. What kept me working in Studio One however, was its audio quality and professional features. That is something I just wasn’t willing to give up.

“Studio One doesn’t disappoint,” Martinez asserts. “The drum editing and quantization features are the best by far. I love that there are never problems with clicks and pops and everything stays perfectly in phase. Audio quality and ease of use are Studio One’s strengths.

Martinez speaks from experience when comparing Studio One to other DAWs and workflows.

“I found my workflow to be much faster and fluid in Studio One, as apposed to Nuendo, which I worked on before for many years. I recently did a comparison of working completely ‘in the box’ with Studio One against my hybrid hardware/software setup—and I can honestly say that the differences were minimal. I now feel completely comfortable working completely in the box when I have to!”

“I can’t wait to see what Studio One has in store for us in version 3,” he muses.

Watch the video for Danilo Montero’s “Dios de Amor” below:

A Typical Gig with the PreSonus StudioLive RM32AI Rack Mixer

Rick’s band Phat Hat took the StudioLive RM32AI digital mixer out for a gig at Baton Rouge’s Varsity Theatre. The gig went great! Rick explains why.

For more on the StudioLive RM32AI, click here.

Update for UC Surface and Universal Control AI Now Available for RM Mixers

We’ve released an update to Universal Control AI and UC Surface for the StudioLive RM mixers.UC-Available-now

Click here for the full change log, download links, and update instructions.

PreSonus i Series: Every Idea can be Your Greatest Hit with @jordytsearcy

Record to your iPad—and then transfer your recordings via Wi-fi to your computer for mixing with the AudioBox i Series interfaces!

 

 

AudioBox iOne Review from @iGuitarMag

A great video review of the AudioBox iOne from Interactive Guitar Magazine! Thanks guys!

For more on the AudioBox iOne, click here!

 

Nimbit Artist of the Week: Tom Rush!

Tom RushNew Hampshire folkster Tom Rush has been in the game since 1961, and having recently celebrated his 50th year of music-making, it’s not hard to see why the guy has endured so well. He delivers everything a listener could want from an acoustic singer/songwriter—adroit, restrained guitar playing, a voice that quietly compels your attention, sincere, relatable lyrics, and—most importantly—great songs.

Really great songs. An adept humorist with a Harvard English Literature degree, Tom understands critical components that escape lesser songwriters: humor and a great story. Add to that a little bit of melancholy and some surprisingly earthy blues romps, and you’ve got a little something for everybody.

Tom is probably best known for 1968’s “No Regrets,” which has become something of a standard in acoustic circles. This is, of course, only fitting—Tom had a major hand in popularizing the likes of Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne, and others, by performing their songs early in his career. Both James Taylor and Garth Brooks cite Tom as a major influence. Furthermore, Rolling Stone went so far as to credit Tom with “ushering in the era of the singer/songwriter. Call it full-circle.

A video of his performance of Steven Walter’s “The Remember Song” went viral in June 2012, causing Tom to comment “I’ve been waiting 45 years to be an overnight sensation, and it’s finally happened!” It’s accrued over six million views at the time of this writing.

Tom Rush’s Nimbit Store has a lot to offer, including a whopping 13 albums, a Blu-Ray, and four DVDs—including a documentary and a guitar instruction course, How I Play (Some of) my Favorite Songs. If you’re new to Tom Rush, start with What I Know. It was voted Folk Album of the Year by The International Folk Alliance.

 

 

 

Hurry, LAST CHANCE to Save Big on Progression 3 and Studio One Artist!

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Hurry, this great offer ends February 28! Click here to get Studio One Artist and/or Progression 3 for just $20.15 (USD) each! If you’re not in the USA, that’s OK—monster discounts are available globally. Get your song on for less money than you even thought was possible!

 

Notion 5.1 Available Now! Includes Ukulele Support and Free Demo Version

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We’ve got an update to Notion to announce today! You can click here for the full list of changes, but here’s the long and short of it: You can now open exported audio stems from Notion in Studio One, with automatic track names, volume, pan, rehearsal marks, and initial tempo and time signature information. Additionally, we’ve made the usual batch of bug fixes, including SoundCloud uploading and adding instrumental techniques for the new Woodwind and Brass expansion packs to display in the palette.

All you need to do to install the update is launch your existing copy of Notion, and you’ll receive a prompt to download the update. To update from My.PreSonus.com, sign in and click on Notion in the “My Software” category. Next, click “Download Notion 5 Installer.”

We’ve also made a FREE demo of Notion 5.1 available to all via My.PreSonus.com. You don’t need to own a PreSonus product to get the Notion demo, just create an account, sign in, and click the button that reads “Click here to try the Notion 5 Demo!” Enjoy, and tell your friends!

Last but not least, we’ve released a Ukulele expansion for Notion and Progression that is available at our online store by clicking here.  The Notion Ukulele was recorded by David Doucet on a Collings soprano ukulele, and includes sample variations for open strings, picked or plucked notes, and both up and down strokes. It’s available standalone or as part of the Acoustic Bundle Pack alongside the Mandolin, Fingerstyle Acoustic Guitar, and Banjo.

 

 

 

 

Studio One Tape Stop Effect

Once in a while we get a request for a tape stop effect in Studio One. Fact is, you can do this by automating the pitch control in SampleOne to achieve the exact same effect! Alex from Wiz Produxions put together this excellent demo showing how its done. Thanks Alex!

Nimbit Artist of the Week: JP Harris and the Tough Choices

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There’s a paradox inherent in the very notion of country music in an internet age. Country has always been directly influenced by whatever the devil pop music is doing at the time, and crossover hits between the two genres are subsequently commonplace. For better or for worse, this has made for some interesting sonic innovations, and a music writer can’t help but notice that the very things that made country appealing in the first place—earnestness, humanity, and real people playing together in the same room—tend to get a little lost in the digital dustup.

Fortunately for you and I, JP Harris and the Tough Choices play the sort of country music that makes one realize that some things were done correctly the first time around. To both their credit and listenability, Harris and company’s sound is less new-school and more no-school. It shoots from the heart rather than for it, and there’s nary a digital artifact detectable on either of their wonderfully emotive full-length recordings. This isn’t to say the records don’t sound old-fashioned, it’s to say that they sound just right. Perhaps they should have called themselves JP Harris and the Right Choices.

A well-traveled troubadour despite being scarcely over thirty, JP left Alabama to travel the country via freight train at the age of 14, guitar in tow. Over his four vagabond years, JP wound up in California before moving through Louisiana, where he recorded I’ll Keep Calling before settling in Nashville, which is the closest he can call to a permanent home.

JP’s influences don’t seem to draw from any music that came out after 1974. The most overt influences echo Buck Owens, and particularly George Jones and two out of three Hank Williamses in woeful tracks like the titular “Home is Where the Hurt is.” The material isn’t tear-in-your-beer from start to finish, however, as there’s a bevy of boisterous fun in tracks like “Young Women and Old Guitars,” which contains a winking nod to low ends via a double-dose of baritone sax and baritone guitar on the same track.

Both Home Is Where The Hurt Is and I’ll Keep Calling are available from JP Harris’ Nimbit store on CD, digital download, and good ol’ vinyl, which was also done right the first time around.