PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: User Stories


Rehearse Silently

Gene Baker over at Music Insider Magazine recently published this great two-part blog series on using the StudioLive mixers for silent rehearsals. The benefits of this are twofold: first is the critical importance of hearing protection; he looks at the steps you and your StudioLive can take to preserve what’s left of your precious hearing. Second benefit of silent rehearsals: no angry neighbors!

A highlight:

“PreSonus have basically blown everyone right out of the park. Their mixer has all your in-ear mixing problems already handled, not to mention, it works seamlessly with multitrack recording and live performances. You really should check into one, plus all the software and apps are free.”

 

 

Click through below to read the posts in their entirety.

 

 

 

#TeamPreSonus Spotlight: Johhny ‘TheMuzic’ Geib!

[We decided it best to give some recognition to our more vocal advocates—and what better way than via a blog series?]

Who are you, where are you, and what do you do?

My name is Johnny Geib and I live in Wheeling IL, 24 miles northwest of downtown Chicago. I work 3rd shift for a company contracted by the IL Tollway to do maintenance and systems support of their Toll Collections systems. 45+ hours a week and never a dull moment. Part time, I run a home-based recording facility for both clients and my own music, and have been doing so for more than 25 years. I started out with a 4-track Tascam, then a Fostex Open Reel 8 track, graduated to a VS2480 in 1998 and Akai DPS24 a year later.

 
How were you introduced to PreSonus?

I was a Cubase\Nuendo user from 2003 till I discovered Studio One 1.0 when I bought a Firestudio Mobile. I used the FS Mobile with Cubase and a FaderPort till I upgraded to Cubase 5. The update was a disaster and put me out of business for a month. That’s when I remembered the free copy of Studio One Artist that came with my FS Mobile. Since I had to get something done while I waited for tech support to get back to me, I installed Studio One Artist and was totally blown away. I was recording and mixing within an hour and saved two clients that were ready to walk because of the delay. From that point, I never looked back and purchased Studio One Professional that following Friday. I have been a PreSonus fan boy since. And now, with PreSonus making studio monitors, my studio is about 95% PreSonus!

 
What PreSonus software/hardware do you use and for what purpose?

Well, not sure you’ll have room for this list in the blog but here goes: Studio One 2.5.2, Capture, Monitor Station, FaderPort, Audiobox 22VSL, AudioBox 1818VSL, Studio Channel, FireStudio Tube, FireStudio Mobile, HP-60 headphone amp, Eris E5 monitors, two M7 mics, two SD7 mics, three HD7 headphones, DIGITube and a StudioLive 16.4.2!
 
What’s so great about PreSonus, anyhow?
Presonus gear and software together just works!!! If you have Studio One, you know ANYTHING PreSonus will work with it. There’s a template or a preset for everything. Nearly zero setup time, great tech support and simply the best users forum in the universe. PreSonus’ techs actually read it and even post solutions for anyone having problems with any PreSonus gear and software. I’ve had the pleasure of attending a PreSonuSphere conference and actually sat down with several PreSonus staff members and they are simply the greatest collection of people that I’ve ever met.
 
Where can our readers learn more about you online?
My main website is www.homestudiotrainer.com where I train people how to setup their own home studios (and yes, Studio One is the main DAW) and many of my own songs, all recorded and produced in S1, can be found at https://soundcloud.com/johnny-geib.
Lastly, My Twitter ID is @JohnnyThemuzic. Thanks for the opportunity to share this! You can find me on the Studio One forums with the “Bat” avatar as themuzic!

#TeamPreSonus Spotlight: Eric Peterson of Rust Magazine!

[We decided it best to give some recognition to our more vocal advocates—and what better way than via a blog series?]

Who are you, where are you, and what do you do?

Hello, I am Eric Petersen, head writer and publisher of RUST Magazine which focuses on writing thorough reviews and doing interviews of emerging artists, mostly in the indie rock space. I’m also DJ Slack, and at my events I play a mix of the new music that comes to me at RUST plus vintage vinyl from thrift stores and garage sales. A typical night with me on the decks mixes punk rock, scratchy old lounge LP’s and fresh new music.

  
How were you introduced to PreSonus? 
Recently I picked up a BlueTube DP V2 to add analog warmth to my DJ kit sound. It worked so great, I reached out to PreSonus to get more involved with their family. 

 
 
Tell us how you use your BlueTube DP V2! 
I use a BlueTube DP V2 as the very last piece of equipment on my signal path for the purpose of adding strength and personality to my sound. Not only is most of the music I play digital, but there’s even a second digitizing EQ along the chain. Adding the BlueTube DP V2 allows me to “warm up” the digital sound with a pair of real tube amplifiers. The result is a richer, fuller sound with a stronger low end and an old-school feeling that most digital music and devices are lacking today. The PreSonus BlueTube DP V2 totally upgraded the personality of my music and people are constantly asking me about it. They hear the music and ask what kind of equipment I am using and I always tell them that having the twin tube amplifiers is what makes my sound so unique.
  
What’s so great about PreSonus, anyhow? 
What’s so great about PreSonus is that their physical equipment is designed by people with a real passion and understanding of music technology. They’re like your twin, finishing your thoughts. They know what you want, and they work their butts off to make quality pieces that are intuitive to use, and affordable to buy. PreSonus equipment has a vibe, a groove, and a style all it’s own. For me it delivers a personality that adds a whole new dimension to my events. It sets a mood that other gear just cannot compare to. 
 
Where can our readers learn more about you online? 

Baton Rouge: Open your hearts and veins for a great cause tomorrow, get a PreSonuSphere T-Shirt!

Baton Rouge residents: PreSonus is partnering with The Blood Center for a blood drive on Tuesday, May 21, from 9 a.m. to 1:20 p.m. There is currently a national shortage of blood, and sadly, deposits made to a blood bank do not accrue interest—so the Red Cross needs all the help they can get! Just a pint of blood can save up to three lives!

Please Click HERE to ensure you are eligible to donate. It is important to eat a good breakfast before donating blood and be sure to bring your photo ID!

The blood mobile will be located behind the Bon Carre buildling, near the PreSonus Audio Electronics entrance.
7257 Florida Blvd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70806

If you are interested, email jobs@presonus.com to confirm a time slot, and here’s some handy tips from the Red Cross for a successful donation.

Generous souls not suffering from trypanophobia will walk away with a bandage on their arm, a song in their heart, and a killer PreSonuSphere T-shirt!

 

 

Nick Cooper on why he switched to Studio One

The hits just keep coming! Here’s American Idol’s Nick Cooper on why he switched to Studio One.

Leading by Example in the Dog-Eat-Dog World of XLR Cable Management

[This just in from Jan-Arend, StudioLive Wizard at Large and Executive Cable Manager.]

IMG_3330Hey guys,

Want to show you something. I saw Big Joe Daddy’s Big Multi-Pin Panel-Box Thingy post on the PreSonus blog. It looked very professional! I too use the StudioLive 24.4.2 on various occasions and locations.
We all want to get the best mixing position for our bands and the easiest place for the console. But having said this, we all know that having at least 30 cables to the mixer on the other end of the stage isn’t easy. It gets messy. So I wanted a flexible solution for my band(s).
One band is very different from the other. One is almost completely acoustic, with 3 vocals, acoustic/electric bass and guitar, accordion, and drums. We use two auxes for wedge mixes. The other band is completely electric, with 3 vocals, drums, electric piano, guitars, and basses. No amps on stage, and four stereo in-ear mixes for monitoring. My StudioLive is also used in churches and other events.

I wanted to make a flexible and very compact snake-system that I could use in both situations. I wanted to have the possibility to get all 24 channels from the stage to the Studiolive, and to get the main and subgroup-outputs plus all the aux outputs back to the stage. Ordinarily, this would require a single 40-channel snake. Everybody knows that these cables are heavy, and not easy to use at all. And every time, I would have to plug in 40 cables into my mixer.
Now my solution:IMG_3334
I had a 30-meter 16.4 snake for a couple of years, and I thought, ”Why not have two of these 16.4 cables, with multi-pins in the mixer case?” So, I bought another 16.4.2 multi-core cable to make a total of 40 channels.
I keep my StudioLive 24.4.2 in a Thon mixer case, from Germany. This case was made for the SL and it fits perfectly. Nice thing about this case is the “semi” doghouse configuration. This gave me room to mount the multi-pin connectors in the case. It took me a week or two to make all the connections and to change connectors of the second stage box. Stage box one has 16 inputs and four outputs (A, B, C, and D). Stagebox two has eight more inputs, all 10 aux outputs from the mixer (with Neutrik combo sockets) and two more outs, E and F. This all gives us 24 inputs on the StudioLive and 16 outputs from the mixer on stage.
With our acoustic band, I only need one snake, and with the other band I use both snakes. Now we can put the mixer anywhere we like, setup time is much quicker than before and we don’t have to carry very heavy cables.
See the attached photos for the result. Maybe this helps other StudioLive users to get ideas about their set-up.

Greeting from a very happy StudioLive user!

Jan-Arend Blok

Jan’s bands:

“De Duifies” are singing Dutch songs from a very popular tv series “ja zuster nee zuster” back in the sixties in the Netherlands.
“Spoetnik” started in 1980 and plays mostly covers nowdays.
thanks and best to you too!!

Lynn Fuston Presents: The iPad Chronicles

Lynn Fuston, head honcho over at 3D Audio, posits a compelling question.

 “Would it be possible to assemble a system that could record 16 inputs onto a multitrack for under $2000?”

The answer is… well, read for yourself. It’s a bit of a lengthy thread but well worth the time. SPOILER ALERT: His solution involves and iPad and the AudioBox 1818VSL.

 

Here’s a highlight:

"I ran a test last night. 16 tracks at 24/96. Recorded for a minute. Added another 16 in record for a minute while playing back the first 16. Then added 5 more stereo tracks. Hit record. Then added 6 more stereo tracks. Hit record. 

Several observations:

1) This is not real world because we don't record 1 minute songs.
2) CPU usage at its highest never exceeded 30%. There are CPU and Disk Space Usage meters right on the front of the mixer.
3) I got "Low Memory" messages at least four times, so I finally quit every other app BUT Auria. That seemed to eliminate the problem.
4) It only bailed on a recording one time, and that was when I had the buffer set to 128. I upped it to 256 and it seemed fine. By then I was playing back 42 tracks at 24/96 and recording 12 more.

I considered doing a stress test and recording for a long duration but file management using iTunes, at least to someone accustomed to using a computer, seems like a real headache. I'm going to wait to do that test until after I finish my actual music recording. I don't want to fill up the drive with huge empty files.

Like the guy at the Apple store told me, "the iPad is designed for GATHERING information." Fascinating. In the big picture, I think he's right. It's a content-vacuum. Videos, pictures, audio: it's designed to collect info. It's really easy to import stuff into an iPad. Exporting (apart from tossing it into iTunes), not so much. So far, it seems like the recording will be the easy part. At least to this seasoned pro who is accustomed to using multiple backup drives and backup utilities like SyncPro and drag and drop file management."

Read the entire thread over at 3D Audio! There’s some great mobile recording opportunities with this setup…