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Friday Tips: The Melodyne Envelope Flanger

This isn’t a joke—there really is an envelope-controlled flanger hidden inside Melodyne Essential that sounds particularly good with drums, but also works well with program material. The flanging is not your basic, boring “whoosh-whoosh-whoosh” LFO-driven flanging, but follows the amplitude envelope of the track being flanged. It’s all done with Melodyne Essential, although of course you can also do this with more advanced Melodyne versions. Here’s how simple it is to do envelope-followed flanging in Studio One.

  1. Duplicate the track or Event you want to flange.

  1. Select the copied Event, then type Ctrl+M (or right-click on the Event and choose Edit with Melodyne)
  2. In Melodyne, under Algorithm, choose Percussive and let Melodyne re-detect the pitches.

  1. “Select all” in Melodyne so that all the blobs are red, then start playback.
  2. Click in the “Pitch deviation (in cents) of selected note” field.
  3. Drag up or down a few cents to introduce flanging. I tend to like dragging down about -14 cents.

As with any flanging effect, you can regulate the mix of the flanged and dry sounds by altering the balance of the two tracks.

Note that altering the Pitch Deviation parameter indicates an offset from the current Pitch Deviation, not an absolute value. For example if you drag down to -10 cents,  release the mouse button, and click on the parameter again, the display will show 0 instead of -10. So if you drag up by +4 cents, the pitch deviation will now be at -6 cents, not +4. If you get too lost, just select all the blobs, choose the Percussion algorithm again, and Melodyne will set everything back to 0 cents after re-detecting the blobs.

And of course, I don’t expect you to believe that something this seemingly odd actually works, so check out the audio example. The first part is envelope-flanged drums, and the second part applies envelope flanging to program material from my [shameless plug] Joie de Vivre album. So next time you need envelope-controlled flanging, don’t reach for a stompbox—edit with Melodyne.

 

The My.PreSonus App: The Gift that Keeps on Giving!

The My.PreSonus app is your connection to your PreSonus products, the PreSonus support community, and the entire PreSonus ecosystem.

Apple users download HERE!

Google Play users download HERE!

Here’s everything you want to know about the app:

The home screen of the My.PreSonus app is your personal PreSonus news feed. Get updated on new products, upcoming events, tips on using PreSonus hardware and software, and more.

PRODUCTS
Register new products from right inside the app, and view all your registered PreSonus products. The My.PreSonus app is the best way to learn more about your registered products. Watch tutorial videos, get access to product documentation, and more.

SHOP
Shop for new PreSonus products right from the My.PreSonus app. Purchasing products has never been easier, and products purchased through the app are automatically registered to your account, giving you immediate access to valuable product resources.

SUPPORT
The My.PreSonus app is the easiest way to get support for your PreSonus products. Search our entire knowledge base, submit and review support tickets, all right from your mobile device. Also, get access to our growing community of users asking questions and providing answers in our community forum. Post questions, search for answers, post answers to other PreSonus users’ questions, and become a contributor to our vibrant user community.

There are tons of great features packed into the app, including viewing your entire order history and saving useful product documentation to your device, and much more. You can even change the look and feel with a theme switcher.

Andrea Bocelli and Studio One at the Top of the Billboard Charts!

Currently sitting at Number 1 on Billboard’s Top 200 Albums Chart is Andrea Bocelli’s latest album, , which also makes him the first classical artist to top the Top 100 Artist Chart in nearly 21 years! Even more exciting is that Studio One was a huge part of this project!
We recently had the opportunity to hear more from Rome’s Jurij Ricotti, who served as the Sound Designer on this project.
“I have worked with Studio One for a long time,” says Jurij. “I’ve used it for all my work in television, including mixing and arranging for the MTV Awards. I used Studio One for all my sound design sessions for this project, which appear on the songs ‘Vivo’ and ‘Sono QUi.'”

“In 2017, I was invited by Pierpaolo Guerrini of PPG Studios to be a part of the preproduction of Sí alongside guitarist Daniele Bonaviri,” he continues. “The album production was given to the great producer Bob Ezrin who’s worked with Pink Floyd, KISS and Peter Gabriel.”

“We met several times in my studio—JGRStudio in Rome—and Pierpaolo’s Studio PPGStudio in Tuscany for the sound design process with Studio One and Pro Tools. During these sessions, I recorded all the acoustic guitars and sound design for the pre-production process of several tracks on the record. I also used Studio One for drum editing for some yet-unreleased acoustic versions… and we were quite impressed by how fast and accurate drum editing with Studio One is.”

“So now, Studio One is officially our DAW of choice and the most active in PPGStudio—Andrea’s main recording studio. It’s been an honor to work with Bob Ezrin, and I’m so proud to work with Andrea Bocelli, the most famous singer ever.”

Follow Jurij on Facebook here!

Join the Studio One Family here! 

 

Learn how to use your ATOM Pad Controller!

Check out the latest videos about our hottest product this year the ATOM!

 

Learn more about the ATOM here:

https://www.presonus.com/products/ATOM

Get the Channel Strip Collection FREE when You Purchase a Studio-Series Interface!

Starting today through the end of 2018, get the Channel Strip Collection FREE when you buy a Studio-Series recording system! It’s like Happy Thanksgiving, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year all at once.

Interfaces included for the promo:

  • Studio 192
  • Studio 1824
  • Studio 1810
  • Studio 68
  • Studio 26
  • Studio 24

Here’s the deal–the Channel Strip Collection is valued at $80 and it’s yours FREE when you purchase one of these interfaces. Once you purchase the interface, the Channel Strip will automatically be added to your my.PreSonus account upon hardware registration.

Here’s everything you want to know about the Channel Strip Collection from Studio One Expert:

 

This offer is available worldwide.

  • Click here to find a dealer in the US.
  • Click here to find a dealer outside of the US.

 

 

 

 

 

Friday Tip of the Week – EZ Squeez: the One-Knob Compressor!

Sometimes you just want a compressor that’s quick and easy. Maybe you’re tracking and need to compress the vocals, or hear what the bass will sound like when you add some compression on mixdown. But you know what happens—you adjust the threshold, and then the ratio, but now realize you need to re-adjust the threshold, which means the output gain needs adjusting…and maybe the knee…

If you have a bunch of ready-to-go presets, great. But here’s another option: The EZ Squeez compressor. It uses an FX Chain macro to alter six compressor parameters at once, so that a single knob sweeps from no compression, to some compression, to compression that’s more like a guitar sustainer stompbox. Although there’s a downloadable preset, I’d recommend reverse-engineering this to learn the power of the FX Chain’s Macro Controls. The principles used in this FX Chain apply to many other processors.

 

Figure 1: Three different Macro Control settings.

Figure 1 (top) shows the compressor settings with the EZ Squeez knob turned all the way counter-clockwise (minimal compression). As you turn up the EZ Squeez control, the Ratio, Release, and Gain increase, while the Threshold, Knee, and Attack decrease. The middle image shows the EZ Squeez knob turned up about 60% of the way. Turned up all the way, the parameter values become more extreme, as shown in the lower part of the screen shot.

Figure 2: (Top) Macro Controls parameters and (bottom) Macro Controls interface.

Figure 2 shows the Macro Controls. Rather than expose the control settings, it’s easier just to download the Multipreset, and then click on the curves for yourself. Note the curves on the Gain and Release parameters. Given that there’s only one node on the curve you can’t get too sophisticated, but these are close enough to give a fairly even response as you move the knob from fully counter-clockwise to fully clockwise.

Because compressors are so dependent on the input signal level, I did cheat on the “one-knob” concept and added an input level control. This allows trimming the input level so that it falls in the compressor’s “sweet spot.” There’s also a bypass button so you can compare the compressed and uncompressed sounds.

As to applications, you’ll probably find that EZ Squeez knob settings of 30% to 65% will work for a variety of signal sources. Past that point, the compressor gets into a more extreme territory that pumps mixed drums, and acts more like a sustainer for guitar. But it’s easy enough to find what works the best—just turn the knob until the compression sounds right. After all, that’s the whole point!

Download the EZ Squeez.multipreset

 

 

 

Friday Tip: Delay-Free Stereo from Mono

After a recent tip on how to extract two mono tracks from a stereo track, one of the comments asked for how to convert mono into stereo. Well, we aim to please…so here’s one option.

A common way to create stereo from mono is by duplicating the track, delaying one of the tracks compared to the other, and panning them left and right. However, this approach has two problems. First, you might not want a delay. Second, when you collapse the signal back to mono, there will likely be partial cancellation due to phase differences. The method we’ll cover here not only produces stereo imaging from a mono source, but collapses perfectly to mono. It works with pretty much any instrument, but is most effective with instruments that play chords (for example, try this on acoustic guitar—it works well).

Console Setup

Create two buses. One of these will become the left channel, and the other, the right channel. In your mono source track, create two pre-fader sends (one for each bus). Turn down the mono source’s fader.

 

Multiband Dynamics Setup

 

Insert a Multiband Dynamics into one of the bus inserts. Solo the bus with the Multiband Dynamics. Click on “Edit All Relative” and set the Ratio control to 1.0. This will set all bands to a ratio of 1.0, which converts the Multiband Compressor into a multiband EQ.

Play the track you want to convert to stereo. Solo each band in the Multiband Compressor, and adjust the frequency sliders to divide up the frequency response evenly over the five bands (the screen shot shows frequencies selected for dry electric guitar). Mute bands 1, 3, and 5.

Next, drag the Multiband Dynamics into the other bus’s Inserts slot. For this bus, mute bands 2 and 4 instead of bands 1, 3, and 5, then pan the two buses left and right. Now the frequency responses are equal and opposite for the two buses. Voilà! Stereo! (Note that you probably don’t want to pan the buses too far to the left and right, because the stereo effect will be unrealistically exaggerated—as in the audio example. But it does get the point across.)

 

We’re not done yet, though. The levels of the two buses will be fairly low because with only two or three bands, the output level will be down quite a bit. Turning up the bus faders may be sufficient to compensate, but if not, turn up the Multiband Dynamics processors’ master Gain controls (not the per-band Gain controls). Feel free to play around with the pan and Gain controls to achieve the desired sonic balance. Also, no law says you need to mute every other band. For example, you might want a bassier sound on the left by muting the three upper bands, and a brighter sound toward the right by muting the two lower bands.

Finally, note that when you toggle the master bus from stereo to mono, the sound collapses to mono without any funky phase interactions. Done!

Studio One Channel Strip Collection – 30% Off for July 2018!

You want seconds? Here you go:  30% off the Channel Strip Collection!

The PreSonus Channel Strip Collection for Studio One Artist and Professional provides a unique way to add tasteful depth and color to your tracks and mixes without leaving the box. Included in the collection are the RC500 and VT1 modeled channel strip plug-ins. RC500 is modeled after the PreSonus RC500 FET Channel Strip. VT1 is a modeled on a high-end tube channel strip. In addition, the free standalone VU Meter plug-in is made from the same components used in the Channel Strip Collection.

 

Click here to purchase the Channel Strip Collection! 

PreSonus Giveaway on May 22! #PreSonus4Ever

We’re hosting a FREE webcast this Tuesday with some preeeeeetttty huge news! We’re excited to share with y’all.

To celebrate, we’re giving away a FaderPort 8 to one lucky entrant during the broadcast! That’s a $500 USD value!

Here’s how to enter:

  1. Must be following PreSonus on Facebook and/or Twitter.
  2. Share the Live Webcast to your personal Facebook feed or Tweet the YouTube Link during the broadcast.
  3. Include #PreSonus4Ever in your post.

And that’s it! You’re entered. One winner will be drawn at random and notified directly on May 22 at 2 pm CST. Contest open globally. Webcast starts at 10 am CST on May 22, 2018 on Facebook and YouTube. TUNE IN!

Using the FaderPort 8 with Neil Zaza

 

Neil Zaza is a career guitar virtuoso who recently took some time out of his schedule to discuss his personal workflow with the PreSonus FaderPort 8 controller. He covers everything from set up to plugins to automation, he goes deep and covers it all! For your enjoyment, we complied the full series into one playlist here. Check it out and enjoy!

For more on the FaderPort, click here! 

For more on Neil, click here!