PreSonus Blog

[This just in from the Press Office of MIDIMusic ProAudio, our distributor in Italy!]

Today, Midi Music has hosted an important event for the Italian key dealers featuring the two main new products recently introduced by PreSonus: The new generation of StudioLive RM Series Rackmount mixers, and the new range of StudioLive AI PA Loudspeakers. About 50 retailers and operators, as well as journalists from Italian commercial audio magazines attended the event.

Francesco Galarà, Midi Music’s new product advisor for the Pro Audio division, described the philosophy and technical characteristics of the RM series, focusing on the unique features and intuitive ease-of-use offered by UC Surface. He also addressed the versatility that makes StudioLive RM16AI and RM32AI suitable for applications in different fields: live sound, studio recording, radio and TV Broadcast, and system integration.

After going deep into the specific details of CoActual and Temporal Equalization technologies, it then has been the turn of the set of StudioLive AI PA speakers.

We conducted a listening test, covering various genres of music from pop to rock, from the classics to jazz and then—the icing on the cake—Tchaikovsky’s famous “Waltz of the Flowers,” which was very suitable for highlighting the magnitude of the StudioLive AI Loudspeakers’ dynamic response, linearity and definition playback—all without compromise at any listening level. The clarity and definition immediately captured the attention and curiosity of the audience, who remained long after the demo with many questions and insights about the features and capabilities of both products.

The event was followed by a nice dinner party, with typical Italian seafood and a fine Piedmont Hills wine selection, offering the participants another opportunity to continue to deepen the discussion about technical and commercial aspects of PreSonus products.

Midi Music ProAudio
Press Office

 

Category StudioLive RM Series | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Wise Wisdom

September 8,2014

[This just in from James Wise, Account Manager for TechRep!]

Hey PreSonus!
Last weekend a good friend and long-time customer of mine was asked to help run sound for the North Coast Bluegrass on the Bay festival in tropical Sandusky, Ohio. He sent me the picture below showing a PreSonus StudioLive 16.4.2 in use by the headliners, Lonesome River Band, mixing their in-ear monitors. The banjo player; Sammy Shelor, raved about his experience with the StudioLive mixers, he said they have owned and used this console almost daily for the last two years with no problems. The only thing they would love to see was something smaller and more portable as they fly a lot, and are not always able to take the mixer on the plane with them, which it sounds like there will be a solution for very soon.
I know the bluegrass scene is a drop in the bucket compared to the rest of the live production that goes on out there, however it is still nice to see some of the top musicians and bands in my little realm if musical interest using products that I represent. Thanks!
CgAAG1P6GOOEbHJiAAAAAHtD5jo519

 

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 4 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Vince Walker, Music Teacher at Tasmania's Deloraine High School!]

Last week Deloraine High School (Tasmania, Australia) held our 4th annual Battle of the Bands, and once again our PreSonus StudioLive didn’t miss a beat! We use our desk for live performances as well as recording our CD each year—thanks to you guys for supporting our school!

The desk was fully tricked out this year, running all six Aux channels (six foldbacks) and the two effects channels, all Fat Channels were being used on effects, auxes, busses, main outs and the normal channels. It is the best desk ever! We use iPad integration to assist tune the foldbacks, and use the Smaart Wizards to tune the whole PA system. Thanks, PreSonus, for building a great desk as well as great software.

We love using Studio One 2 Professional for recording and mastering our own music. The native plugins are very useful, the DAW is so easy to use, and we get a great sound from the software every time. My students have learned to use PreSonus gear and software, and they can take the knowledge they learn to other outboard gear or DAWs… but why would they change?

Thanks!

Vince Walker
Music Teacher
Deloraine High School

 

 

Category StudioLive | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Jean Madani, producer and recordist in Beirut! Jean has been an audio professional for his entire adult life, and PreSonus has been a part of his process for nearly as long. Lately, he has begun using Studio One (and a few other pieces of PreSonus gear) for all of his digital audio needs. But enough from me—let's hear about it from the man himself!]

MY STUDIO ONE STORY

I have been recording, mixing, performing, and producing for and with different artists and different types of music for more than thirteen years, in genres ranging from traditional Arabic music, to pop, rock, hip hop, and jazz.

I have probably used every major DAW available, but Studio One has been my DAW of choice ever since I came across it in a studio session two years ago. Khalil Chahine, an excellent engineer and friend of mine from Germany recommended it to me. I had been complaining during a tracking session about how slowly the session was going with the DAW we were using at the time. I found it to be so needlessly time-consuming and clunky. So, we promptly switched to Studio One mid-session, and I never looked back. In all honesty, it’s the single best decision I have made in my career as an audio engineer. 

The wealth of good things I have to say about Studio One could fill a whole book, but for the sake of brevity, I’ll try to summarize what I like best here. My very first impression was that of pleasant surprise at how fast the software started up. I have tons of plug-ins, so launching any DAW used to be a painfully long wait. Studio One got up and running for me in less than fifteen seconds, and in a matter of two hours I was running Studio One like a pro. It was just simply that intuitive.

The drag and drop features really speed up my workflow, and I’m not exaggerating when I say that they were like a gift from audio heaven. Tasks that took me hours to complete in other DAWs take up mere minutes now. Also, the ease in which audio quantizing is handled in Studio One beats any other DAW out there in my opinion, and the native plug-ins like Pro EQ are simply amazing, and very transparent.

I often record traditional Middle Eastern instruments such as the oud, buzuk, and riq. I’ve found that applying algorithmic EQ can be destructive to the unique character of these instruments’ sound. EQing these instruments while faithfully retaining their desirable frequencies used to be very tricky, but with the “Pro EQ”, this previously critical and sensitive process has become like second nature to me. I almost never use any other EQ in my sessions at all anymore.

I also really like the thorough one-click integration Studio One has with Melodyne; with just one click, audio becomes MIDI. Another favorite feature of mine is the bank scenes. It’s extremely helpful when wrestling with intimidatingly large sessions. At the moment, I’m mixing an Arabic Fusion album, in which smallest session weighs in at about seventy tracks, minimum. Suffice to say, the ability to save and re-load specific channel selections is helping to immensely un-clutter both my workflow and my monitor screen.

To sum up, Studio One has made my workflow faster and my mixes translate much better than ever before. I don’t think I will be using any other DAW again in the foreseeable future, and I feel that it deserves to be the new industry standard.

In addition to Studio One, I also use a PreSonus Studio Channel and the BlueTube DP preamps. The quality of results I get from both products is consistently outstanding. I get a clear,  warm sound when I use the BlueTube’s solid state option, and when I want those extra harmonics, the tube option does the job and then some. I ran a comparison test with so-called “high-end” preamps, and got results that stand toe-to-toe with the supposed best out there. Also, I recently tried adding tube saturation to the signal chain while recording an oud in an acoustic session with the Studio Channel, and it yielded very pleasant results.

Finally, I use a FaderPort in conjunction with Studio One, making its already fast workflow even faster and easier. I like the smooth fader and response so much, that I wish PreSonus would make a larger DAW controller with even more faders!

I choose PreSonus for the simple reason of that they really deliver what they claim to offer, with quality that far exceeds the price point.

Here are some shots of Jean teaching a Studio One / StudioLive workshop at LAU! 

Jean Madani’s current projects: 

  • Rayan el  Haber: album to be released this year (Arabic fusion )
  • Jad Nasr: album to be released this year (acoustic folk)
  • Fer2et 3a Nota: to be released this month (Arabic fusion)
  • Oumaima el Khalil: starts recording this July, to be released early 2015 (acappella)

 

Category StudioLive | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Another YouTube hit from Frog Leap Studios, this time exploring some heavy seven-string riffage.

Signal chain: Ibanez RG 7620 >> Kemper Profiling Amplifier >> PreSonus StudioLive.

Sounds good man, keep it up!

Category StudioLive 32.4.2AI | 3 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



This just in from Peter Scott of P C Scott Audio Productions, who just took his StudioLive on a Tour of the Tropics! You can read more about the Tour of the Tropics in our initial blog post on the matter, but the short version is that it’s a great tour of country music artists in Fiji, with the added bonus of StudioLive training!]

Here’s some new photos from the event.

Category StudioLive | 3 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



This Saturday, WUMB’s “Local Folk” program For the Sake of the Song will celebrate Bob Dylan’s birthday by airing excerpts from last month’s Tribute to Bob Dylan concert. The show will also feature interviews with the performers and more behind the scenes material. The show will be streamed live at  www.wumb.org at 1:00 p.m. EST on Saturday, 5/24/14.

Patrick Coman of WUMB says, “PreSonus users might be interested to know that we recorded the concert running both stage and room mics through the StudioLive 16.4.2. The guys at the studio did a bit of clean up of the raw audio and then I used the StudioLive and the Studio One software to record and edit voice overs and production of the raw audio into our final segment.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Category StudioLive | 35 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Peter Scott, Production Manager of the "Tunes in the Tropics Tour" coming up in Fiji!]

Hey PreSonus! I wanted to let you know that we’ll be taking a StudioLive mixer with us on the “Tunes in the Tropics Tour” in Fiji!  This will be our third trip to this venue. The Hideaway Resort is near Sigatoka on the Coral Coast of Vita Levu the main island of the Fiji Island group.
The Tunes in the Tropics Tours were initiated by Chris Watson, a young entrepreneur who lives in Tamworth, which is Australia’s country music capitol. Chris has been a keen traveler, and has developed his own travel firm, Chris Watson Travel Partners, with his wife Gemma. They both love country music, and are well known in International Travel Line Dancing circles.
Chris’ idea was to take Australian country music to other parts of the world, and so five years ago the first Tour of Australian Country Artists headed to Fiji. There are usually six or seven A-list artists and a backing band who each perform their own music on one night of the tour. The last night of the tour features a showcase of every Artist. Chris invited 100 country music lovers to join him on the first tour, and this year he has completely sold out the Resort with 220 fans and nine acts for a week of great music and fun!
The Fijian people are very friendly, and local live production is usually undertaken by companies such as Sharma Music who have a network of music stores around the Fiji islands. The Fiji dollar is fairly weak in international terms, so purchase of equipment is an expensive exercise so much of the local equipment we hire from them is older analogue gear.
As I started gear shopping for this third tour, it became obvious we needed to run at least four sends of in-ear monitors plus up to four powered wedges. This prompted us to look at the available consoles. The best we could find locally was an analogue board with digital effects. It required a lot of outboard processing to make this work, adding pressure to our budget.

As I have been a PreSonus user for over two years, I knew PreSonus embraced good ideas. I sent off an email to Baton Rouge HQ to see if they could help. At the time, PreSonus didn’t have a local distributor in Fiji, so I approached Amit Sharma, the owner of Sharma Music, to see will he may be interested in the idea of becoming a new distributor. He was very keen to see PreSonus’ offering, and we explained the StudioLive advantage—it would streamline his production workflow while adding the ability to record performances. For me this a no-brainer, as the end user experience for me has been far better than all the other audio manufacturers I have dealt with to date.
With assistance from Nigel at Oceania Audio Sales, the PreSonus Distributer in New Zealand, we will have a Presonus Studiolive in the Fiji Islands for the very first time! As a sweetener we are going to do some training sessions for the local production people to show them the extensive features of the StudioLive range, including QMix, and record some live performances with Capture and Studio One.
There will be a Q and A session at the end of each session. Should anyone
want to join us, they can contact me via Facebook.
Bula Vanaka to all at team PreSonus!
Peter Scott
Production Manager
“Tunes in the Tropics Tour” to Fiji 2014
Australia

Category StudioLive | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Doug Gould of WorshipMD discusses the use of subgroups on the StudioLive mixer, and how and why you would want to learn to use them. For example, routing all of your drum mics to a single fader makes the drum mix a LOT easier to control. Oh, and he’ll also show you how to assign your subgroups. It’s easy.

For info on the StudioLive AI digital mixers, click here.

For more from Doug Gould and Worship MD, click here.

Category StudioLive 32.4.2AI | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Doug Gould of WorshipMD discusses when to boost, when to cut, and when to leave things just the way they are when dialing in EQ during your band’s sound check. In short: think subtractively.

For info on the StudioLive AI digital mixers, click here.

For more from Doug Gould and Worship MD, click here.

Category StudioLive | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard