PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: Studio One


Studio One Raises The Bar Again on Feb 25

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TUNE in on February 25th at 10 AM or for the 2 PM rebroadcast at:  http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive.

 

UPDATE 2/16/16: we’ve added more prizes to this show! You’ll receive a prompt to enter the giveaway via e-mail when you view the show on Feb 25. We will also have a separate giveaway for our Twitter audience.

It’s time for another FREE mind-blowing update to Studio One 3! Tune in on Feb. 25 at 10:00 a.m. CST for interviews with several accomplished producers, where they will be showing off everything new in the forthcoming update to Studio One 3. We’ll also run a rebroadcast at 2:00 pm CST.

What ARE the new updates, you ask? What are the new features? And when are they coming?


Tune in on Feb. 25 to find out, at: http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive. We’ll be giving away a StudioLive RM16AI to a viewer of the first broadcast.

Pre-register via this Eventbrite ticket to receive an e-mail reminder on the day of the show!

 



StudioLive RM16AI Real-World Field Test by John Tendy

Check out this two-part video from John Tendy detailing his use of the StudioLive RM16AI to mix and record a real gig, and then take home the recordings to do a quick (and I mean quick) mix in Studio One!

This is a great no-frills, real-world look at the practicality and power of the StudioLive RM16AI. Tremendous thanks to John for his work on this and support of PreSonus! We appreciate you.

Studio One 3 Professional Wins Software Award at NAMM2016

Studio One Award

Big thanks to Music and Sound Retailer for this recognition at NAMM 2016. While the award bears MSR’s name, Studio One 3 Professional was chosen by music dealers who voted it to be the best of the year. We’re honored, and you all are too kind. To learn more about Studio One 3, click here. 

 

Studio One User Sets up Shop in California Starbucks

Starbucks-Gamer-2016Ever bring your laptop to a coffeeshop to work on your music outside the house? It’s a known fact that a change of environment can do a lot for your creativity.

But check out this guy. Go big or go home, am I right? This dude set up his Studio One rig at a Starbucks in California, complete with a huge curved monitor, mixer, power conditioner, MIDI keyboard controller, computer, two cell phones, a pack of fig newtons (I think) and several Priority Mail boxes.

Anybody know this guy?

Credit to dmizz over on Reddit for posting the photo. Click here for the original thread.

Review Of The E-Instruments eBass Complete Bundle from Studio One Expert

You can get the e-bass add-ons via our online store. Click here to shop.

Now Available: Nori Ubukata—20th Century Synth Box Vol. 1

We’ve got a new Mai Tai preset collection for Studio One 3 Artist and Professional! Take a trip back in time with Nori Ubukata’s 20th Century Sound Box and rediscover the legendary analog sounds of the 70s and 80s. Famed Japanese sound designer and synth/theremin artist Nori Ubukata recreated some of the most memorable sounds by electronic music artists such as Kraftwerk, Tangerine Dream, Vangelis and Wendy Carlos. The set contains a total of 111 presets and Instrument+FX presets (adding reverb, EQ and other effects). Also included are 50 Musicloops with sound elements showcasing the best presets in musical context.
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Nori Ubukata boasts an impressive resume. An accomplished thereminist (there aren’t too many of those) and synthesist, Nori has been listed as one of the 1000 greatest composers in Japanese history. He’s composed hundreds of songs for television programs, commercials, and video games in Japan, and has also lent his talents to synth sound design, notably for the Yamaha GS1, their first FM synth. Most recently he has developed many synth sounds for Lady Gaga’s 2013/2015 concert tour, and is currently developing a new theremin-based original instrument.

Click here to buy it from our online store.



 

Free: Recording in Studio One Made Easy

Getting started with home recording just got a whole lot easier this holiday season. Purchase any PreSonus audio interface and register it at my.presonus.com before January first and you will receive the Recording in Studio One Made Easy course from Home Recording Made Easy.

Home Recording Made Easy will teach you on how to do everything from hooking up your hardware to your computer, recording an entire song using a modest recording studio set-up and finally mixing that song using the tools in Studio One.

This series is nearly 3 hours in length and has 10 video sections. Whether you have switched from another DAW to Studio One or if you are brand new to home recording this series is for you. This is also the perfect enhancement when giving the gift of recording this Holiday Season.

 

Already got your interface, but still want the course? Save 50% on Recording in Studio One Made Easy using this link.



 

Introducing the eBass Add-ons for Studio One 3

01d439be-0fa0-4022-b4f8-4cb96d209cc4[This just in from Thomas Koritke of e-instruments, who shared some valuable insights on the creation of our new eBass Add-ons for Studio One 3! These sample packs include VERY meticulously sampled recordings of a 1975 P-Bass in various styles. They’re available for all editions of Studio One 3: Artist, Professional, and Prime, and can be purchased on shop.presonus.com website or directly from inside Studio One.] 

We are really happy to see our eBass released! I hope the following gives you some valuable information on our instruments.

We recorded a 1975 Precision Bass in a studio here in Hamburg—actually the same studio that we used to record our Session Strings, Session Horns and Session Keys instruments. It is one of the few facilities left with a large and great sounding room.
We used a Millenia TD-1 tube channel for the Vintage Bass instruments, and an Avalon DI preamp for the Classic Bass. We also recorded the bass via an Ampeg SVT top with 112 speaker, just as a sound reference. However, we ended up using only the DI signals for our eBass instruments. The DI signal provides great flexibility for additional processing with amp simulators and EQ, so the reference amp recording was a tremendous help when we designed the Instrument+FX presets—we could always compare them to the real thing. Strings were medium 045-105 round-wound for the classic and the same gauge flat-wound strings for the vintage. The pickup set was the original from 1975.

The bass was performed by a completely unknown, but extremely patient bassist here from Hamburg. Sampling requires a very special skill set and what we ask a musician can be quite hard or boring for a famous virtuoso. The player has to be able to have great control over dynamics and sound as well as keeping a certain dynamic throughout the entire tonal range. He has to be very patient and controlled, should not produce any noise, should not move, and has to repeat notes several hundred times… it’s a painful process, but it’s worth it: with both flatwound and roundwound  strings and two playing styles—pick and finger—for each string type, eBass provides THE classic Precision Bass sounds.

Despite the previously mentioned attention to details, I think the most interesting part of the product is in its scripting, sound design, and music loops. Our goal is to provide very flexible and easy to use great sounding bass sounds. As such, we designed these Add-ons with presets for different use cases. Some people love to perform a bass line on a keyboard. The performance presets are designed specifically for that. They include an intuitive legato function (legato on the same string–within a fourth interval), velocity switching for dead notes or harmonics, pitch bend control to trigger slides and hammer-on/pull-offs and even control over the left hand position on the neck via mod wheel. All articulations are instantly available.

Other producers are used to selecting different articulations via key switches. We have created the production presets for them. Here, all articulations are accessible via dedicated keyswitches. The production presets also feature left hand position control via mod wheel. Both preset types are available as “dry” Presence XT presets, or as Instrument+FX presets including a chain of Ampire, EQ and Compressor.

Finally, some musicians may just need some inspiration or use an existing bass line and modify it. Each eBass includes Musicloops in different styles, genres and complexity levels – from fairly basic to quite busy. They all come with a dedicated effects chain setting to match that specific style or genre.

All the best,
Thomas Koritke
e-instruments

Jake Owen: on the Road with PreSonus!

Jake Owen is in the enviable stage of his career where he can work with whatever gear he wants. As such, we’re flattered that he’s taking a complete PreSonus recording rig on his tour bus that includes Studio One, Sceptre Monitors, ADL preamps, and much more. Any musical idea that his band has during impromptu jams can be recorded right on the road, without needing to stop in a recording studio!

For more on Studio One, click here.

 

 

Willem Rebergen, AKA Headhunterz, Chooses Studio One 3

willemCNN recently reported that “Electronic Dance Music (EDM) is a $6.2 billion industry” and “the fastest-growing music genre out there.” Through cult-like followings on social media, hundreds of worldwide festivals, radio airplay, and collaborations with pop artists, EDM artists continue their foray into and beyond the mainstream.

One of these artists is Willem Rebergen, better known to his 172,000+ followers on Instagram as DJ Headhunterz. Rebergen kicked off his career in 2006 as a DJ and music producer, and quickly grew into one of the biggest names in the industry, recently performing at several major festivals, including Electric Daisy Carnival and Tomorrowland.

After eight years making hardstyle music, Rebergen was ready to tackle a new challenge. “Right now I’m translating my signature sound to something a bit different from what I used to do but I don’t necessarily want to settle in a single genre anymore,” he states. “I want to feel free to go where my heart wants to go. Everything changes—and so does my personal taste, so listening to that is the only way for me to keep tapping into my full creative potential. Who knows what I might make tomorrow?”

We recently chatted with Rebergen about where he wants to take his music, his creative process, and working with Studio One. “I have been using Studio One for about two and a half years now and I am currently on version 3,” Rebergen states. “I make EDM, so I would say I use Studio One for composing and sound designing. I basically use it for anything necessary to produce a song.”

A longtime Logic user, Rebergen was turned on to Studio One by a recommendation of a very wise friend. He was immediately hooked. “I had been on Logic for years, but became unsatisfied with the lack of development of the software since Apple bought it. I felt it got behind compared to other more forward-thinking companies making DAWs,” he asserts. “I tried Ableton but that wasn’t exactly what I was looking for either. I was excited to give Studio One a go—I’m always eager to test new software, I’ve always been kind of a nerd, honestly. Looking for the next thing that improves workflow or sound quality. Studio One immediately felt natural to me, it really didn’t take me long to get used to, and I think especially for people coming from either Logic or Cubase it will feel very intuitive right away.” 

“When I started using Studio One, I was very happy to feel back in control of my audio editing. The cutting tool felt very “direct,” and I loved the slip editing tool which I didn’t have before. Automation was as tight as it could get, and very quick and convenient—which was also one of the reasons for my switch. That is how automation should be! When you make electronic music I often want to be very surgical with drawing in automation, and Studio One simply allows for this at all times, even under the pressure of latency-inducing plugins. Latency compensation is always on point!”

Another feature that made me fall in love with Studio One was Track Transform. It’s so much more flexible than in any other DAW that I know of, and opens up a whole new spectrum of working with content that otherwise would be literally frozen and untouchable.

“Furthermore, I have been working more quickly in Studio One than ever before. The browser changed my way of working completely, and motivated me to create a perfect personal library where all my hard work is stored and ready to put back into action. When I create a sound in a soft synth, I create a Musicloop by dragging it into my browser. This saves not only the synth preset, but also the MIDI sequence and effect Plug-ins. It even lets me play a preview when I select it in my browser, so I know exactly what I’m about to drag into my project. I could not think of a more convenient way to browse through my self-made sounds.”

“All of these functions have made it possible for me to feel much more creative while being in the actual creative process, and not being pulled out of it by having to search endlessly for that particular sound I’m looking for, or having to work around functions that are not doing what I want.”

“I also create a lot of macros to improve my workflow, I’m totally in love with the new arranger and scratchpad function which allows for me to be much quicker and intuitive when arranging my songs without making a mess.”

As a full-time producer, Rebergen’s working knowledge of Studio One runs deep. When pressed for workflow details, he’s much more open than many of his peers. “I recommend that Studio One users make full use of the Browser and the Musicloops,” he opines. “When I finish a song, I completely undress it and save all sounds I made in the form of channel presets, Musicloops, and audio files. With every song I make, my library expands—and whenever I’m in the creative process I can recall any sound I am looking for without having to get into sound designing or endlessly searching through sample libraries. I make sure that every sound I save in MY library is on point, so they rarely need a lot of tweaking to fit into a song and I can just get on with concentrating on the creative part.”

He’s also taken advantage of using other, prehaps modest applications in conjunction with Studio One to accellerate his already blazing workflow. “I keep an app open alongside Studio One called Sticky Notes. I type down all my newly-made key commands—yes, I constantly make new ones! I then force myself to use them all the time so they become a natural part of my workflow. Customizable key commands make everything so much quicker, and Studio One allows for using them for almost anything.”

“Studio One invites us to have the best workflow we have ever had,” Rebergen continues. “I can’t believe I had been able to keep up with making new songs in the total mess I was working in when I used Logic. With every update, PreSonus puts out come fantastic new features which shows that the team is eager to keep pushing forward. They actually listen to what users want, and notice what users have been missing out on while working with other software. Coming from Logic, Studio One  it gave me much better audio editing, better automation, more overview, a better overall workflow. I could keep going…”

And going he is. Rebergen has his hands in a lot of different projects apart from his own. “Currently, I have a collaboration out with R3hab called “Won’t Stop Rocking” on Spinnin Records. Other songs I have released this year are: “Live Your Life” with Crystal Lake and “The Power Of Now” with Steve Aoki. And, of course, some solo tracks, as well.”

Rebergen closes with a shout-out to the PreSonus krewe. “Team PreSonus has the perfect mindset to create the perfect DAW. In my opinion it already is the best DAW out there, and it’s going to get even more awesome, I’m sure. I’m beyond grateful to have Studio One in my life!”