PreSonus Blog

Brazilian heavy rockers Eminance recently released this video for “Unfold.”
Guitarist Alan Wallace says, “I recorded my guitar with the DigiMax 96k.  The sound is heavy, but still very clear! For vocals we used TubePre  and Studio Channel.
Thanks guys, sounds amazing!

 

Category TubePre V2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Sometimes bass players have it the worst. Many (most?) of them have a refrigerator-sized amp that won’t even fit in that car of theirs, what with the sleeping bag and Coleman stove taking up all the room. In fact, a little-known statistic is that 30% of chiropractic clients are actually found to be bassists who have been lugging around monster amps for 10+ years. Sad.

Furthermore, vintage tube-driven 8×12 bass rigs can be a pain to record with, because those loud, wide, bass- frequency waves cut through EVERYTHING, and it can be nigh-impossible to get any sort of isolation when tracking live. And recording that thing in your apartment? Fugeddaboutit. You’d be evicted faster than you can say “Joey DeMaio.”

Enter the PreSonus Studio Channel. A lesser-known application of the Studio Channel is that of a direct injection box for recording bass. Heck, you could even use it to play bass live and run directly into the front-of-house. HomeTracks over on YouTube illustrates this application perfectly in his recent video, showcasing the myriad tones that can be achieved by running your four (or five-, or six-) string baby into the Studio Channel—no amp required! Keep the gain low for cleans, or push that glowy li’l tube for some mid-range grittygrind.

Category Studio Channel | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Ayron over at 2INFAMOUZ recently posted a couple great reviews of the AudioBox Studio and the Studio Channel. His AudioBox Studio review is particularly nice, as he breaks down every component of the package, including the M7 microphone and HD7 headphones.

Here’s some highlights:

“You’re not going to find a better deal than the Audiobox Studio when it comes to a low budget recording package. This package includes everything required to start recording at home, and it’s all superior to other products in the price range.” 

“The Studio Channel’s class A vacuum tube preamp provides you with a handful of different settings and parameters to bring vocal recordings to life… you couldn’t ask for much more in a preamp. The fact that the PreSonus Studio Channel is only around $250 is incredible.”

Thanks, Ayron!

2INFAMOUZ also boasts some great tutorials on production, mixing, and mastering that are definitely worth a read!

Click through to check out the reviews for yourself:

 

 

Category Studio Channel | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Thanks to SoundsAndGear for this great review!

 

Category Studio Channel | 16 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



We have a LOT of promos going on this month. Even we’re having a hard time keeping track of them all. That’s all Rick’s fault, really. But it’s because he likes you all so much! Here’s the gist of it:

Buy a StudioLive 24.4.2, get a free PRM1 reference mic!  Here’s the Free PRM1 Form. You can get more details here. Offer ends May 31.

 We’ve dropped the prices on two of our StudioLive mixers! Get the 16.4.2 for $1,799 and the 24.4.2 for $2,999. No rebates, no buy-two-get-one-free, just a lower price. Wow!

Studio One Professional 2.5, $100 off through April! Get with the best for a low low price! This is an instant rebate that will be available through your local PreSonus dealer or StudioOne.PreSonus.Com.

 

Save $30 bucks on a TubePre V2. This is an instant rebate available at your local PreSonus dealer. Easy money.

Save a whopping $50 on the PreSonus Studio Channel. This is another easy instant rebate available at your local PreSonus dealer.
Last, but certainly not least, if you upgrade from any other version of Studio One to Studio One Professional 2.5, you are entitled to the Simon Phillips Session Tracks drum loop library for FREE! Click here for the rebate form so you can grab your copy—ASAP!

 

Category Uncategorized | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Fluff

[This just in from Fluff, AKA GuitaristFacts, who has an absolutely KILLER YouTube channel full of heavy metal riffage, gear demos, facial hair, and all the endeavors where the three coincide. He produces his videos as skillfully as produces his music, and he’s chosen some PreSonus gear to help him along the way. He was kind enough to share a few paragraphs about his recording tricks and experiences with PreSonus gear.]

Hello, my name is Ryan, but my friends call me “Fluff.” I make guitar-related gear demos on YouTube in my home studio for companies all over the world. Pickups, speakers, guitars, pedals, microphones, you name it. I also produce the occasional record and re-amp guitars for rock albums, and record about five days a week. For all of this work, I rely exclusively on couple of pieces PreSonus gear that I simply would be lost without.

I should probably mention that I try to capture every kind of guitar tone, from brutal to chiming. In order to produce a wide array of tones, I need an interface that offers flexible signal routing, low latency and high-quality instrument inputs, as well as low noise on the outputs. The PreSonus FireStudio Project is perfectly suited for all of these needs. Two instrument inputs, (I keep one set for guitar, one set for bass) loads of inputs and outputs and +48V power when needed to run my condenser microphone for when I do voice work. WIN!

I also use the PreSonus Studio Channel as my go-to mic preamp. The built-in EQ and compression make it extremely versatile for clean guitar tracks, vocals, huge distorted guitars, and bass cabinets. I am also a tube nut, and I find that replacing the stock tube (a high-gain tube with good midrange) with an inexpensive NOS 12AX7 JAN tube (usually about $30 on eBay) can really round off the harsh highs I sometimes experience while recording high-gain guitars, and fattens up my signal prior to going into my FireStudio Project.

When it comes time to record, I use a Heil PR30 about 90% of the time for guitars, as that mic has a very flat frequency response. Knowing this, I can get the microphone placed in the ballpark (usually around the area where the dust cap meets the speaker cone, on-axis) and then use the Studio Channel’s EQ to fine tune the highs and mids (I typically boost about 2dB in the 3K range with a medium Q) until I find a nice sonic pocket for the guitars to sit in the mix. If I want to add a bit of flavor, I will add a Shure SM57 plugged directly into the FireStudio Project and then bring the volume up on the SM57 to add some bite and ‘oomph’ for palm mutes on the distorted guitars.

As for the aforementioned re-amping, I plug straight into the FireStudio Project and adjust the input level so I am seeing an average -16dB, with peaks no louder than -12dB. This way I have some wiggle room when outputting the DI through my re-amping box (I use a Radial ProRMP), as sometimes I need a stronger signal to go over a long lead or something like that.

I am asked quite often which interface people should get when diving into home recording, and I always say PreSonus for two reasons: first, they have the computer driver experience that allows their products to work the first time, right out of them box, problem-free. Second, the customer service and support is outstanding. I found out first hand when I called about my 8-year-old FirePod interface and was treated like I was in The Rolling Stones.

Seriously, why can’t more companies operate this way?

-Fluff

Twitter

YouTube

 

 

 

Category Studio Channel | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Check out the latest heavy metal recorded via the PreSonus Studio Channel from @guitarist_facts!

Category Studio Channel | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard