PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: Recording Systems


Studio 192 Quick Setup Guide

Looking to hit the ground running with the Studio 192? Look no further! Justin shows you all you need to do to get rolling with your new interface and take advantage of low-latency monitoring, Fat Channel processing, speaker switching, and more via UC Surface.

You’ll also learn how to use Studio 192’s integration with Studio One for remote preamp control, Fat Channel DSP, and Z-Mix outputs.

 

For more on the Studio 192, click HERE!

Jessie Kol and Perry Sorensen on the PreSonus Studio 192

Jessie Kol and Perry Sorensen recently had a great experience tracking their newest single on the Studio 192, and they sent us this great video about it!

Sounds great, you two—and that studio is gorgeous, BTW!

Vahagn Sepanyan’s Bass Skills on Display in “ConFusion”

Check out this great video from Vahagn Stepanyan—tracked using an AudioBox USB and Eris E5s!

Vahagn says: “I am bass player, composer and arranger, and for my work I had to choose good audio equipment with high quality. I tried many studio electronics, before I found my favorite with great quality—PreSonus! Compared with other electronics, PreSonus is inexpensive and available to any user, and the most important fact is that it’s not inferior to others. It sounds great and has a true sound production.”

Thanks Vahagn!

A big day for updates: Studio One 3.2, UC Surface 1.5, StudioLive AI Firmware updates (including RM Mixer Cascading), Capture 2.2, and Studio One Remote!

Wow, there’s a lot going on today. This is a long post, so let’s jump right in!

Studio One 3.2

Studio One 3.2 is available now! This is a FREE update to existing owners of Studio One 3, including Artist and Professional editions. Click “Check for updates” in Studio One to get it for yourself. Click here to visit the newly-updated Studio One site for even more details.

Read the full change log by clicking here, but here’s the short version of what’s new:

  • Mix Engine FX with new Console Shaper plugin: Apply effects to a bus that have an effect on all channels routed to the bus. Our first Mix Engine effect is Console Shaper, allowing you to impart analog-style artifacts like crosstalk and drive, evocative of classic analog consoles of yore.
  • VCA Faders: Control groups of channels with a single fader. Link your VCA to a Folder Track for added convenience.
  • Enhancements to the Arrow tool: Highlight the top half of an event in the Edit window to contextually convert the Move tool into the Range tool.
  • Other updates include: extended comping, improved Tab-to-Transients, New Transport Options, Automation Editing Improvements, improved Appearance Controls, and DSP Fat Channel and preamp control for RM mixers—as well as Preamp control for RM mixers and Fat Channel control and integration for both RM mixers and AI Consoles—straight from Studio One!

StudioLive AI firmware updates

New firmware is available for the entire StudioLive AI line from your my.presonus.com account, allowing for control from UC Surface 1.5.

  • 32.4.2AI
  • 24.4.2AI
  • 16.4.2AI
  • RM32AI
  • RM16AI
  • CS18AI

The new firmware for RM Mixers brings hotly-anticipated cascading to the RM series StudioLive Rackmount Mixers. Any two RM mixers can be cascaded via AVB to combine their channel counts. This update also adds a new Stage Box mode, in addition to the existing Remote I/O + Monitor-mixer mode.
This mega-release also brings a number of other new features and refinements, including a whole slew of bug fixes. To see the full rundown of new features and fixes, check out the UC Surface 1.5 Release Notes and the UC Surface 1.5 Release Addendum, available on your my.presonus.com account as well as on the Dowloads section of the Product page for each mixer at PreSonus.com.

UC Surface 1.5

This update adds support for cascaded RM mixers and Capture control—if you’ve installed the above-mentioned firmware and Capture 2.2. This update also adds support for USB 3.0 on Mac OS X 10.11.2 or higher. Get UC Surface 1.5 here.

Capture 2.2

Capture can now be remotely controlled by a StudioLive CS18AI and UC Surface. You can now control virtual soundcheck, transport, and Record arm; drop markers; and keep an eye on record times from anywhere in the venue—among other improvements and some bug squashing. Get it here.

Studio One Remote

Studio One Remote has been updated for Studio One 3.2 compatibility, and is also now available for Windows tablets! Studio One Professional owners can get the Windows version from their my.presonus.com accounts; Apple users can get it via this link to The App Store.

 

Online Shop Exclusive–Save on Audioboxes before March 31, 2016

audiobox_stereo_600x600_2-10-16_nee01It’s true–we like you. A lot. So much so we’re offering the PreSonus AudioBox Stereo recording kit for just $139.95!

This steal of a deal includes:

  • AudioBox™ USB interface with cable
  • Studio One® Artist recording and production software (DAW)
  • HD7 studio monitoring headphones
  • Two small-diaphragm studio condenser microphones with cable

Whatever you’re recording–rehearsals sessions, live performances, podcasts, worship gatherings– the AudioBox Stereo kit has everything you need. It’s simple, reliable and portable.  And it won’t miss a beat or slow you down!

This is a no-fuss, no-muss, temporary price drop for customers in the US of A all because we like you. Don’t wait to add this to your PreSonus collection. Offer ends March 31, 2016.

 

Introducing the Studio 192 Mobile

Built to create in the studio or on the go. The PreSonus Studio 192 Mobile USB 3.0 audio interface delivers exceptional sonic fidelity, flexible connectivity, and professional monitoring and mixing controls in a compact desktop design. Whether you’re a producer, an audio engineer, an independent band, a sound designer, or all of the above, your Studio 192 Mobile was built for you to create.

Learn more about it the Studio 192 Mobile by clicking here, or by watching the video below, or both.

 

 

Studio 192 Available Now!

The Studio 192 is now arriving in the hands of customers!

Here’s a great overview Rick did with the kind folks at Sweetwater.

 

Steve Cook Chooses PreSonus for Seymour Duncan Project

[This just in from Steve Cook, session bassist extraordinaire!]

This music business is a funny one. We have our steady gigs, we have producers that like to call on us for different sessions, then there’s the ‘X’ factor: the random gig calls. Sometimes they are for a used car lot sale or a hot dog stand dedication, however sometimes they are from the largest pickup manufacturer in the world. I like hot dogs, and I like Seymour Duncan pickups a whole lot as well.

The voice on the other end of the phone was Kathy Duncan, the head of Seymour Duncan, and her request was a simple one: “Can you record samples of every one of our bass pickups? You have creative liberty to do whatever you like, we just need the samples to be consistent, and representative of the pickups their truest form.”

Well, that narrows it down a bit, doesn’t it?

There were a couple of hurdles to leap in order to make this happen. First, we needed to find all the instruments required in which to install the pickups. Second, I found a tech that would come to the recording sessions and basically work on an assembly line of removing and installing pickups. For example, as I tracked the first P-bass pickup, he would be installing the first Jazz bass pickups, then we’d swap instruments, and move on to the second in each type, and so on.

Where the logistics were a bit daunting, the one constant on which I could rely was my recording set up. For this project (and all my home recording projects), I run PreSonus Studio One through a couple of FireStudio Projects, controlled with a FaderPort. The Class-A preamps in the FireStudios sound amazing, and Studio One is an incredibly fluid and easy platform in which to work. The FaderPort made the whole process easy. I had controls under my left hand with a bass in my right. The finished files sound great, and I (and thankfully Seymour Duncan) were happy with the results.

The project was really a lot of fun for me for several reasons. Rarely do we get to sample dozens of pickups at the same time. As I go back and listen to the individual tracks, I have been able to pinpoint exact tones I like paired with certain instruments, and I know exactly which pickups to install in my personal basses—mission accomplished! I also liked getting to know my Studio One software and other PreSonus products more in-depth, and that I have great sounding tools at my fingertips.

Thanks PreSonus, for continuing to impress, and for keeping us Nashville musicians rockin’! You can hear the demos over at the new Seymour Duncan site.

Musically,
Steve Cook

 

Ian Ethan Case’s New Album, Run Toward The Mountains, Recorded With FireStudio Projects, Available Now

[This just in from Ian Ethan Case, who used some PreSonus gear on his latest album. Check out the video preview for some of his astonishing work.]

When I first set out to record Run Toward The Mountains, I wanted to go for the absolute best sound quality I could. I had a unique opportunity to record at a new state-of-the-art recording studio where I basically had unlimited free studio time, and access to some of the best mics, preamps, and converters that money can buy. I worked with the engineer there over the course of two or three days just working on different mic setups, just working on tone.

While I was happy with the sound we got, I also did some experimenting at home where I just have two really good mics and my FireStudio Project; no preamps, rack gear or $600 direct boxes. I was pretty shocked to find that I was actually getting just as good a sound with my home setup, and actually even preferred it a little bit over the “million dollar setup” at the studio! I’d always had great results from my FireStudio interfaces but this gave me a new respect for them, and gave me a feeling of freedom knowing I could record at home and know that I was getting world-class results. It’s a good thing, because I ended up spending two years working non-stop on this album (a 92-minute double-disc), whenever I wasn’t playing concerts. When you’re not on the clock you can take the time to make things right and achieve a level of tightness that’s tough to get to otherwise, and I’m really grateful I had a way to do that for this album.

When it came time to master it, I was so happy with how the tracks had come together that I decided to bring it to the top-tier mastering house in Boston (M-Works Mastering, in Cambridge). I was expecting the mastering engineer, who has worked with his share of Grammy-winning artists and producers, to kind of complain about the tracks I was giving him, as I did all the mixing myself and I’m not a real mix engineer. But he was actually really complimentary of the mixes and only made very small adjustments. I know it wouldn’t have been that way if the raw sound of the interface I recorded everything through wasn’t solid to begin with.

At this point I’m absolutely thrilled with how the album came out and have never been so proud of something I’ve put out there. I’m grateful that I had a way to do it the way I did it, recording at home, despite not having tens or hundreds of thousands to spend on gear.

Save $20 on the AudioBox iOne in the USA—Now with Studio One 3!

iOne_Rebate_300x300_6-9-15Ready to get started recording guitar? Well, for less than the cost of that ill-advised vintage true-analog quadra-flange pedal you bought a couple months ago, you can get an AudioBox iOne and Studio One 3 Artist. It’s everything you need to record guitar at home. (Everything except a computer or iPad, that is—that’s on you.)

That’s right, I said iPad—meaning after a quick install of Capture for iPad, you can record your guitar tracks the AudioBox iOne to your AppleSlab, and then beam the recordings over your wi-fi network to your main computer (where you’ve installed Studio One, RIGHT?!) to tweak, sculpt, and mix your tracks.

Click here to find a dealer.

 

 

 


 

Oh, and here’s a great review of the iOne from Guitar Interactive Magazine: