PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: Mixing Systems


Imogen Heap and the StudioLive 16.0.2 Doing Science

This is a triumph. Imogen Heap recently showed up on Dara O’Briain’s Science Club, and she brought her otherworldly Power glove 2.0 MIDI gyro-accelerometer Kinect-handwear with her. We’re flattered and honored that she’s entrusted the StudioLive 16.0.2 to corral her abstruse mad-science signal chain.

Seriously, how many different technologies do you think are collaborating in tandem here?

Wishbone Ash and the PreSonus StudioLive

Joe Crabtree, Live Sound Engineer for Wishbone Ash, picked up a StudioLive 24.4.2 for Wishbone Ash’s most recent tour. He’s running front-of-house from his StudioLive, and—like many StudioLive owners before him—was able to offload a rack full of old compressors, reverbs, gates… the usual suspects.

Furthermore, he’s really using the board to its fullest. He records every show to Capture, and his band is taking advantage of the remote in-ear monitor control features available via QMix.

Enough chit-chat, just watch his vid. Joe, thanks so much for this!

Big Joe Daddy’s Big Multi-Pin Panel-Box Thingy

[This just in from Big Joe Daddy, PreSonus forum regular, guitarist, industrious cable-wrangler, and all-around great guy.]

Hey PreSonus, I finally got my multi-pin panel built and installed. The rack panel sits in a road case that serves as a stand for the StudioLive 24.4.2 mixer. The road case also has a power conditioner, a couple of drawers, wireless in-ear transmitter, etc, and the stage snakes are stored in the bottom of the case during transport.

The big cable on the left in the photo below feeds a fan-out to the mixer. The two smaller multi-pin cables feed 12×4 stage boxes. The XLRs are main outs, sub outs, and Auxes 9 and 10. (Auxes 1-8 are fed to the stage boxes. The mixer sits in a Gator case with the doghouse. Setup is a snap. The large multi-pin cable is stored in the doghouse for transport, so I never have to mess with plugging things in to the back of the mixer!

I play guitar in a band made up of weekend warriors like myself. We play small venues, mostly bar gigs and winery gigs, with an occasional barn party thrown in for good measure.  In addition to my guitar playing duties, I’ve also fallen into the role of ‘sound guy’, audio engineer, roadie, booking agent, transportation coordinator, finance manager, and marriage counselor. 😉 

Since I’m not as energetic as I once was in my teens, I’m always looking for ways to simplify the transport and setup process of all our gear. We have a tandem-axle trailer with a ramp door, e-track, interior lighting, etc. It holds all our gear in road cases with casters. If it doesn’t have wheels, we burn it. We joke with folks telling them that we play for free, and that we only charge to move all the gear in and out! 😉
Part of the burden of setting up our 5-piece band is to ensure that all the cabling is set up properly. We run with five wedges (or in-ears), a couple of mains, and a couple of subs, in addition to a full suite of drum mics, two Axe-FX II guitar rigs, keys, bass rig, etc, etc. Everything is run through the StudioLive 24.4.2.
Inevitably, especially when it’s dark, there are ‘gremlins’ that sneak their way into the setup process wreaking havoc at the last minute, typically from a cable getting plugged in incorrectly, or something of that sort. I often use gaff tape to cover any unused jacks on equipment to avoid mistakes. And of course everything is labeled.
My latest effort to help make our setup and breakdown process as easy as possible has been the introduction of a multi-pin snake system. Basically it’s made up of the following components:
  1. Multi-pin fan out snake that plugs in to the rear panel of the StudioLive, and the other end plugs into a large multi-pin connector on the rack panel.
  2. Two 12 x 4 stage boxes that connect to 35′ multi-pin snakes and also connect to the rack panel.
  3. A rack mount panel that houses all the multi-pin connectors and is mounted in a road case which serves double-duty as a rolling stand for the StudioLive mixer and case.

When we roll in to a gig, we merely open the doghouse of the mixer case where the fan out snake is stored and always stays connected to the StudioLive. We plug in the big multi-pin to the rack panel, and then roll out the two 35′ sub-snakes and stage boxes that are stored in the bottom of the road case for transport.

The stage boxes are positioned at the front of the stage and the back of the stage. This lets us run relatively short XLR cables to everything and keeps the stage clutter to a minimum. The stage boxes are clearly labeled so there’s a lot less chance of error when plugging things in.
We position the StudioLive 24.4.2 on the side of the stage next to me so I can access it if needed. I’ll do a quick virtual sound check with the iPad running a Capture recording created previously. If we’re lucky enough to have someone running sound for us, we’ll put them on an iPad. All of our monitor settings and Fat Channel settings are saved to a scene before we hit the venue, so most of the time, it’s turn it on and roll with very little tweaking.
I’ve got to give credit to Papa John of Papa Grows Funk for the ideas and guidance in putting this multipin system together. He has a similar setup that he demonstrated during Presonusphere. He took the time to answer my questions and make suggestions prior to placing the order.  All the boys in Papa Grows Funk are great guys. Many thanks.
When I got on board with PreSonus a few years ago, I started with the StudioLive 16.4.2. Instantly I was sold on the features, and ease of use, but most of all the improved sound quality over my old analogue board. Later I added the StudioLive 16.0.2 because the darn thing was so small and portable. It’s perfect for all sorts of venues when size and portability are important. Lastly, I added the StudioLive 24.4.2 to the quiver and I couldn’t be happier. The added features on the StudioLive 24.4.2, along with all the cool software PreSonus keeps releasing, makes me wonder what more I could ask for.
I’ve become extremely passionate about live sound, audio engineering, and pursuing the best possible sound quality for FOH. With the constant upgrades to the software and firmware, it’s like getting a new piece of equipment with each release. Kudos to all the folks at Presonus for such wonderful products and for listening to your customers. You’re providing incredible value to folks like me.  You’ve earned my business.
Joe “Big Daddy” Hinkens

Presonus Studiolive Tutorial En Español

Gracias a MrLoveBites de YouTube de este vídeo StudioLive!

 

FIVE New Smaart Videos Featuring John Mills!

Check it out! Paul just wrapped up this great set of five videos describing the latest and greatest Rational Acoustics technologies that can now be added for FREE to the StudioLive 24.4.2 or 16.4.2 mixer that you already own… or the one you’re thinking about getting.

Try each of these features once, and you’ll wonder how you ever lived without them.
John Mills on The Smaart System Delay Wizard:

John Mills on The Smaart Spectra Spectrograph

John Mills on Smaart Real Time Analysis

John Mills on The Smaart Room Analysis Wizard

John Mills on The Smaart Output Check Wizard

MI7 and PreSonus at Inter BEE 2012!

[This just in from MI7, our distributors in Japan!]

We exhibited at Inter BEE 2012. Recognized as a professional show for audio, video and communications, Inter BEE has established itself as an international exhibition showcasing top-level domestic and overseas broadcast, video, audio and lighting equipment as well as peripheral applications and solutions all under one roof.

We displayed two sections for music production solutions: medium-format live solution and small-format live solution. StudioLive and Studio One was most popular! The visitors enjoyed the sound and hands-on experience. We obtained approximately 700 leads! I attached some photo for your reference. Thank you for your support.

WORLD PREMIERE – Scott Szeryk – “Black Squirrel Funk” – Live at Aeolian Hall

Up for some funky shred? Because Scott’s StudioLive 24.4.2 sure was. Sounds like a studio track, but this is allllll live. 🙂

 

Ray Johnston Band Produces EPK Track Live via StudioLive 16.4.2

[This just in from the Ray Johnston Band!]

Hey PreSonus! We finished the EPK, all recorded live from our PreSonus 16.4.2. Hope y’all dig. Bobby Sparks was on the gig as you will see!

Like what you hear? Check out the Ray Johnston Band on the platform of your choice:

 

 

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Scott Szeryk Opines on the StudioLive

[This just in from Scott Szeryk, composer, six-string virtuoso and Royal Conservatory of Music gradate!]

“Since switching over to the PreSonus StudioLive 24.4.2 Scott Szeryk has never sounded better in the studio or on the stage…  Szeryk’s latest release “Guitar Manifesto” is evidence of just how good the PreSonus Studio Live sounds!” Give it a listen!

Since the mid-90s, I had been using the Tascam M3500 as my main mixing desk for the home studio, but was becoming a bit weary of its compatibility with modern-day recording setups.   When I heard how great the XMAX preamps sounded on a StudioLive, I was instantly sold.  Not to mention the insane power and functionality of the board, especially for live FOH!  Changing over to the StudioLive 24.4.2was an easy, practical decision…The StudioLive not only shines in the studio but also in live applications!  We were able to do spot- on monitor checks, even before the band had arrived at the venue for sound check, by playing back program material from shows previously recorded in Capture. The integration of Universal Control also meant that the onstage players could also control their own monitor mix via iPad SL Remote.   There were a few times when we were able to Mix FOH on the iPad when there was a less-than-ideal location for the board at the venue. We rely heavily on the PreSonus StudioLive for recording all of our shows.  Check out the latest DVD “Scott Szeryk live at Aeolian Hall!”

 

I’m totally into big, awesome guitar sounds but my favorite instrument to record is drums. I love  capturing all aspects of the drum set with the right mics, and experimenting with their creative possibilities. When working with the whole kit, I’m adamant on new skins top and bottom and experimenting with different tunings—how the top head is tuned in relation to the bottom head in particular.
As a starting point, I also like to have the toms tuned in fourths. I have favorite mics for certain drums. An SM57 will always sound great on the snare top, and a nice condenser mic on the bottom to blend in some of the articulation. Shure KSM 32 or 44 on the Toms, and AKG 414 for overheads…   A good sounding room is a must and does make a huge difference in the way the drums sound…   I will also add in room mics to add some cushion and depth into the drum mix…   Like anything if the drums sound great in the room and the drummer is playing well you can get great results with basic micing, but not the other way around…  Using a photography analogy, if the talent is not looking good and the lighting is poor, you can have the greatest camera in the world and the results will be poor…
It’s not about having the best gear, it’s about a great performance and knowing your gear.  What I love about the PreSonus StudioLive is just how great the XMAX preamps sound. We actually did a comparison with some API and Neve preamps, and the difference was extremely minimal when the tracks were soloed. I use minimal compression on the snare and kick, just to even the attack out. I apply minimal EQ to remove some of the boxy frequencies inherent with kick drum and toms.  If the room sounds great I will not use reverb, so the drums are kept pretty simple.  It’s all up to the musicians to deliver a top notch performance. I’m not into samples. if the drums don’t sound good, it’s because they don’t sound good at the source, so we will change things up until the sounds are great, once again at the source.

Smaart Measurement Technology Now Available for StudioLive Mixers

It’s here! It’s here!

Rational Acoustics’ highly regarded Smaart Measurement Technology™ is now available in PreSonus’ Virtual StudioLive™ remote-control/editor/librarian software for StudioLive™ mixers.

These astonishing technologies are now available FREE from PreSonus.Com! Get the Smaart Wizards and shoot the room!

To add these free features to your StudioLive mixer, grab the latest version of Universal Control, with all its wizardly goodness. Click here for details on this significant, free upgrade.

Universal Control v1.7 – PC

Universal Control v1.7 – Mac