PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: Control Software


LOS ANGELES: Come on out to PreSonus Exchange Live!

[This just in from Byron Gaither, our very own consummate audio expert and Studio One know-it-all!]

Here are some photos from the 2nd L.A. PreSonus Meetup. We had an open mic for anyone to perform on. We recorded them via Capture, and the entire show was run through the StudioLive 32.4.2AI and StudioLive AI PA speakers. We were then able to open up their songs in Studio One for quick mixes. This is only the second event like this we’ve done, and we had double the turnout of the first!
If you live in the Los Angeles area and are interested in PreSonus, industry networking, or both, you should come on out to the next event; they are hosted monthly. You can learn more and sign up at our Meetup.com page by clicking here.

Kirk Farmer of Dirty Rumors on the PreSonus Solution

[This just in from Kirk Farmer of the Dirty Rumors, who are living the PreSonus life to the fullest!]

Thanks for the invitation to be included in your blog. We are called Dirty Rumors. We’re a quasi rock band / jam band from Roanoke, VA comprised of Kirk Farmer, (Me) on lead vocal and guitar, Tim (Caesar) O’Sullivan on lead guitar, Scott Sutton on bass, Ben Hite on keys, and Thomas Wilson on drums. We’re more of a jam band than anything. Our live performances are heavy on the long instrumental jams with variety of influxes including rock, funk, blues and county. We actually have a large collection of live tracks that can be streamed from our website. Most of which were also recorded using the same equipment and software we used to record the EP. The EP is called Unity Gain and was released online through TuneCore.com in January.

I was originally introduced to PreSonus when I worked as a recording engineer in Raleigh, NC. I saw a demo of the StudioLive 16.4.2 at a show put on by one of your distributors in Greensboro. I was particularly impressed with it’s ease of use and by the transparency of the preamps.

I few years later, I relocated to Roanoke,VA and brought on a business partner named Nate Potter in order to expand my mastering studio, K-14 Studios service offerings to include mobile, multi-track recording. Nate was also a big fan of the Presonus gear and owned a 16.4.2, and also introduced me to Studio One.

Tim and I formed Dirty Rumors in September of 2012. When we made the decision to record our EP, it was only logical that Nate and I produce and engineer the project using the PreSonus gear that we had been using to record our clients with.

As mentioned before, we primarily use the 16.4.2 for tracking. One of the great things about this setup is its mobility. All we need is the board, the laptop, the snake and some mics and we’re in business—literally! We use Capture to track everything, including overdubs. Once we get the tracks back to the studio, we use a FirePod as a speaker/headphone interface, and mix the sessions on Studio One. We also use Studio One’s project page for mastering.

The things we like most about the PreSonus hardware are the quick setup time and the preamp quality. With other digital mixers, we can potentially spend a significant amount of time just getting the board settings where we want them. Using any outboard gear  just adds to the process. With the 16.4.2, we can be powered up and signal and level checked in less than 10 minutes.

As far as the preamps are concerned, the transparency and gain insures a good recording the first time, every time. This is paramount when recording a live show where we might not get a second take. They also allow for a great deal of flexibility during the mixdown process. We can make a lot more creative decisions about the overall sound of the project when we don’t have to contend with preamp coloration introduced by your hardware.

On the software side, Studio One is undoubtedly the most flexible and user-friendly DAW I’ve ever used. It’s intuitive, powerful, and very easy on my CPU. In the past, I’ve primarily used Pro Tools and Audition, both for their different strengths: Pro Tools for tracking and Audition for mastering. Studio One combines the best of both worlds in one very dynamic suite.

Nate and I are currently working on a video project for a band from Lynchburg, VA. Again, we used the PreSonus gear for the tracking, and continue to use Studio One for the post- production processing. Our last major project was the Unity Gain EP, which we created ourselves from start to finish. Dirty Rumors is rumored to be recording a concert video in May at the new amphitheater in downtown Roanoke. We plan to use the 16.4.2, tied in to the FOH board through a splitter snake to record the audio from the show.  We’re also talking about recording a full length album this summer, and PreSonus is along for the ride every step of the way!

Hero’s Last Mission on the StudioLive 16.4.2

The kind sports at Hero’s Last Mission put together this exceptional video describing their workflow with the StudioLive 16.4.2. They are using the board to its fullest in both the studio and onstage, taking advantage of features like QMix personal monitoring and scene recall for saving board settings appropriate to multiple venues. Furthermore, they record live shows to Capture and then mix later in Studio One!

Hero’s Last Mission is taking advantage of the full PreSonus solution. Are you?

AudioSavings video coverage of StudioLive AI, Eris, Sceptre, and SL Room Control from the PreSonus booth at NAMM 2014 (Video)

Kind press folks the world over swung by our booth at NAMM 2014, cameras in tow on tiring shoulders. Here’s some clips from AudioSavings exploring the StudioLive AI mixers, SL Room Control, and the Sceptre and Eris monitors. More videos from other sources to come!

StudioLive AI Mixers:

SL Room Control app:

Sceptre and Eris monitor speakers:

New StudioLive and Capture 2 AI Training Videos

Rick, Justin, and our hard-workin’ video team just wrapped up a series of no-less-than 14 new videos covering the StudioLive AI digital mixers and Capture 2. Topics include editing and saving your Fat Channel presets, connecting your StudioLive AI to wireless devices, Quick Mix Scenes, and tons more, all divvied-up into brief, tender, bite-sized morsels. Dig in, eat up, and pig out on our feast of knowledge.

StudioLive AI Mixer playlist:

 

Capture 2 playlist:

PreSonus StudioLive AI on Tour with Phil Wickham / Shane and Shane

Here’s Travis Brockway, live sound engineer for Shane and Shane and Phil Wickham, recently brought the entire PreSonus Active Integration package on the road for the bands’ Christmas Tour. Here, he discusses his experience with the StudioLive AI mixers, and why they’re the right fit for small-to-medium sized churches.

Furthermore, he takes a look at the StudioLive AI speakers, and how they make for the best possible live performances—and how  Capture 2,  Studio One, and Nimbit make for effortless recording, editing and online distribution of performances and services.

For more on the Active Integration family, click on any of the following:

 

SL Remote, QMix, and AB1818VSL Remote updates now available

Updated versions of SL Remote, QMix, and AB1818VSL Remote, all compatible with iOS 7, are now available for free in the Apple App store. Have fun and happy mixing!

 

QMix and VSL Remote Updates Delivered to Apple

Good news: We have submitted updated versions of StudioLive Remote and QMix to the App Store for Apple’s approval. We expect it to release in the next few days.

Please note that we have no control or influence over how long Apple may decide to take to give us the green light on this—thanks for your patience!

Click here for more info: http://bit.ly/18Buo7G

Scott Szeryk’s “Celtic Rainbow,” Live at the Aeolian Hall

[This just in from Scott Szeryk!]

Hey PreSonus, I hope all is going well!!  We have just released out latest live video “Celtic Rainbow,” all recorded at the Aeolian Hall, in London Canada, June 8, 2012. on Studio One and the StudioLive 24.4.2.
Here is some insight as to how we recorded our show, “Live at the Aeolian Hall.”

We multi-tracked the entire show via the Studio Live 24.4.2 into Capture.  Great care was taken on ensure that the instrument sources all sounded top notch (drums, bass, guitar, keys) and appropriate mics and DIs were used to capture the sounds of the instruments.

Drum mics were as follows:

  • AKG D112—kick
  • Shure SM 57s—snare top and bottom
  • Shure KSM 32’s—toms
  • Shure KSM 137—hi-hat and ride
  • AKG 414s—overheads

For post-production (mixing and mastering) we used Studio One, and things were kept pretty simple as the performances and sounds were good at the source.  I’m not a “fix it in the mix” type of engineer, so the sounds have to be great to begin with. Also we didn’t use any drum samples whatsoever. The drums sounded great and basic EQing (cut some of the boxey mids) and slight compression (just a hint, 2:1 with slow attack to keep the bass response) were used on the drums, and that’s it. Guitars were plugged straight into the Fractal AXE FX2, bass and keys ran DI.  The XMAX preamps on the StudioLive are so good that it helped the mix come together pretty quick!

Guitar Manifesto can be purchased by clicking here.

#TeamPreSonus Spotlight: Paul Peters!

[We decided it best to give some recognition to our more vocal advocates—and what better way than via a blog series?]

Who are you, where are you, and what do you do? 

Paul Peters, FOH/IEM (in-ear monitor) engineer, producer, songwriter, and performer. I’m also a PreSonus artist.
How were you introduced to PreSonus?
My experience with PreSonus started in 2008, when a church in Merritt Island, FL wanted to get a small compact console for their satellite campus.  I did research and loved the PreSonus StudioLive 16.4.2. I ordered the console, installed it, and began a love affair with PreSonus that is still strong. On multiple tours over the past five years, I was contacted by the band A Day To Remember in 2009, because the IEM system they were using failed.  I suggested the PreSonus 24.4.2.  They purchased the console and flew me to Ocala, FL to tweak it out for them.  They loved it, and I was soon hired to be their FOH/IEM engineer for two tours. After tens of thousands of miles, and countless shows, the mixer is still running strong.  Because of the quality and reliability, the PreSonus StudioLive family has been the first suggestion I make to touring bands, clubs, or houses of worship.  I have also been on tour with Sick Puppies, We Came as Romans, Otherwise, and Papa Roach.
What PreSonus software/hardware do you use and for what purpose?
Personally, I own a StudioLive 16.4.2.  I use it when I play clubs or when I mix other bands.  I purchased the mixer in 2010 and have yet to have anything go wrong with it.  I have also installed PreSonus StudioLive consoles in over 10 different venues including clubs, concert halls and houses of worship.
What’s so great about PreSonus, anyhow?
The functionality of the StudioLive consoles is where it truly shines. Great sound quality, comprehensive layout and portability makes the StudioLives great for any application.  The virtual sound check is an incredible tool. The WAV files from Capture rival most pro DAWs.  My favorite feature is Universal Control’s remote iPad mixing.  It has eliminated the need to pull an audio snake for a FOH position in just about every application.  Tweaking monitors and house is completely portable, and easy.  My iPad, router and StudioLive mixer are my best friends.
What are you working on now—or next?
Recent PreSonus adventures have been the A Day To Remember IEM mix, the Heritage FOH mix, and the Ridiculous Youth Conference in Panama City Beach.  I’m sure my next gig is right around the corner.
Where can our readers learn more about you online?