PreSonus Blog

Category Archives: Artist


MUTEMATH: On Tour With PreSonus and Dante!

MMalbumcover

Click to pre-order “Vitals” on iTunes!

MuteMath is a Grammy-nominated American alternative rock band from New Orleans that formed in 2002. Their dynamic sound combines moments of stillness with dance, hip-hop and pop beats. Paul Meany’s vocals make it a point to invade your personal space—his lyrics that continue to resonate with listeners for days after a listen.

Stubbornly refusing boredom or stagnation, MuteMath consistently lives on the cutting-edge of their craft, thanks to a creative work ethic—it’s safe to say that all of their work is their best work. After a short hiatus since their last studio album in 2011, MuteMath is excited to debut their fourth album Vitals, releasing November 13.

PreSonus recently partnered with MuteMath to take two newly Dante-enabled StudioLive RM32AI mixers and a StudioLive CS18AI on the road for their entire US Tour. In true MuteMath tradition—this was something of a rock’n’roll first.

Check out the video below to see what Paul had to say about taking an all-PreSonus mix solution on the road.

Click the image to the right to see how they’ve got everything hooked up. Dante makes it easy—imagine the difference between setting this up with a lightweight CAT5 cable as opposed to traditional, heavy, analog cables!

 

MuteMath_Hookup4

Hookup Diagram [PDF]

iCanStudioLive Multimedia Studio in Jakarta Chooses PreSonus for Full Solution

[This just in from Lucy Willar, Co-Founder of iCanStudioLive. She took the time to answer a Q&A from Laz Harris, our very own Asia-Pacific Sales Manager, to tell us a bit about what makes iCanStudioLive lead the A/V production industry in Jakarta—and how PreSonus is a part of it!]

  • What is iCanStudioLive? What was the inspiration for the name?

Lucy: iCanStudioLive is the leading audio/video live recording producer in Indonesia. We produce quality content every day, and provide a one-stop solution from creative design to pre- and post-production and digital distribution. Our production team works very closely with quality talent to create unique programs to attract the global netizen. We’re located in Jakarta. Please feel free to visit our fully-equipped studio!

The inspiration for the name came from our ability to do everything at one place—integrated and digital. Once you enter our studio, you will immediately think, “I can do this! I can do that! I can do everything I want!” Also, coincidentally, our other founder, Irsan Wallad’s nickname is “Ican.” So it was a perfect match with his vision on live recording, too. Then we named our studio “iCanStudioLive”—all one word, please!

  • What does your studio specialize in? Who do you cater to?

Lucy: We specialize in live recording, and help with concept and creative design for both audio and video. We are the first, and now leading the industry in live recording. We cater to skillful musicians, younger musicians, and prodigies. Case study: Joey Alexander, who is now becoming very popular in the USA.

  • Who is iCanStudioLive? (your team, their roles)

Lucy: We have full team: A General Manager who takes care of all studio activities, a Program Manager who take care of all programs—existing and future ideas. We’ve also have a Creative Manager who takes care of production, and a Post-Production Manager who takes care of post-production audio/video. Last but not least we have a two-person editor team, five production assistants for audio and video, general affairs, security, etc. All told, we are 16 people.

  • Whose vision was it to start the studio? When did it start?

Lucy: It’s Ican’s vision. He started this dream 15 years ago while doing his own business in multimedia.

  • Can you give us some information about why you have chosen the complete PreSonus solution over all of the available choices?

Lucy: PreSonus offers a single integrated control system for both live performance and recording.

  • Can you give us an explanation as to how it’s all hooked up? Perhaps explain a bit about the wiring between the control room and studio and your basic signal flow?

    Ican

    Irsan”Ican” Wallad

Lucy: Capture 2.0 makes for easy multi-tracking and routing channels from the StudioLive to the DAW. For live use, we make heavy use of the Fat Channel in the StudioLive console mixer—it allows us to control Gate, EQ, and Compression when used for front-of-house. Furthermore, we can color the live sound with the StudioLive’s built-in FX. On the other hand, for studio recording—we need everything kept FLAT at the source, and the StudioLive’s clean preamps provide excellent clarity with no audible coloration. It’s great for both applications.

  • Last but not least, perhaps some background on Ichan, how he got into audio, etc.

Lucy: Ican fell in love with music when he was nine years old, and got started with multimedia when he was 13. His parents worked at a multinational company (Mobil Oil) as a joint venture between Japan, Indonesia and US. After getting a degree in architecture, he started doing live recording in 2007, and was eventually invited to record the local Symphony Orchestra in 2011. He built iCanStudioLive in the same year. Now he’s recording almost every day!

Thank you Laz! It’s great to be one big family and we are looking forward to work closer for years to come.

Best regards,
Lucy Willar

 

iCanStudioLive

PreSonus LIVE: Using Plugins Live with Nothing More now Available on YouTube

The guys in Nothing More tour with a StudioLive RM mixer, running their favorite plugins at their live shows. Here’s how they do it.

Learn more about StudioLive RM here
Get the acoustic version of “Jenny” here

.@NothingMoreRock’s Acoustic Performance of “Jenny” from PreSonus LIVE

 

Nothing More delivered this incredible performance of “Jenny” for our recent PreSonus LIVE webcast. Of course, they absolutely NAILED it.

Latest @BrianBotkiller Album, “In Case of Revolution,” Produced in Studio One and Available Now!

In Case of Revolution[This just in from PreSonus artist and good friend Brian Botkiller. His latest record was produced on a StudioLive and in Studio One!]

For my new record, In Case of Revolution, I tracked all my vocals and did all of my mixing in Studio One, as well as instrumental tracking.  I began the record in the Studio One 2 era, but I finished the record in Studio One 3.  I also mastered 52 songs in Studio One last year bfor a project I was part of called “Weekly Beats,” which challenged participants to write and release one song per week in 2014. I managed to finish the project, and Studio One was integral to that. It was so easy to take stems into Studio One, mix them, then go into the Project section to begin the mastering process. I built a template which I was able to start from, which made the whole process much easier.

I also used my PreSonus hardware in these projects, namely my StudioLive 24.4.2 for an audio interface during tracking, and my Faderport for fader control while mixing. Both are very important in my Studio, which is based around a PCAudioLabs pro audio computer running Windows 8. I composed many of the songs in Ableton Live using Ableton Push. Using Ableton in conjunction with Push hardware and Studio One really made making this record much, much easier.
In Case of Revolution is a protest and battle record.  It is a mix of Electro, Progressive, and Techno. The title track features Jon Fugler of the awesome progressive techno group Fluke, as well as Corrupt Frame and LithoChasm. “Battle Cry,” another of my favorite songs on the album, features vocals by my wife, Joy Coy. I also play the drums on the record on some songs, namely my Ddrum Dominion kit on “Warpath,” which I recorded in Studio One using my StudioLive 24.4.2 and Blue and Samson mics. There’s also a great mashup/remix of my song “Welcome to Postwar USA” by my friends at Rubion 7. Everything was tracked and mixed in Studio One.
The record is self-released (for now) on a USB stick attached to a hand-painted brick, limited to 100 copies. It’s a piece of art, as I believe that music is indeed very much art. I also love tangible representations of music, but I do not plan to make CDs for this release, the record is not being sold via iTunes, Amazon, or the like, and it is not on Spotify at this time. It is only for sale via BandCamp and when fans get directly in touch with me at http://www.brianbotkiller.com
I believe that we, as artists and musicians, need to insist on some value of our art.  t doesn’t make us sell-outs; it simply means that we do want to be able to keep making our work.
PreSonus is very important to my workflow; I work very fast using PreSonus gear, and that’s what I love about it—getting the job done!
The new record can be purchased at http://brianbotkiller.bandcamp.com

In Case of Revolution

Perry Sorensen, Head of Mastering at Naxos, Chooses Sceptre S8

[This just in from Perry Sorensen, Head of Mastering for leading classical music distributor Naxos of America! He’s chosen the Sceptre S8s as his new weapon of choice, and used them on the upcoming Live From Music City: The Best of Giancarlo Guerrero and the Nashville Symphony, which releases on August 14!]Perry-Sorenson-and-Sceptre

 

Q. Can you provide some background on Naxos of America?

A. Naxos of America is the leading independent classical music distributor in the U.S. and Canada. They specialize in state-of-the-art distribution and marketing and promotion. We distribute nearly 65,000 SKUs to traditional brick and mortar retail, as well as offering a comprehensive suite of services tailored to consumer direct fulfillment. Naxos of America is also one of the world’s largest digital distributors of independent classical music and video, supplying a catalog of over 1.6 million tracks and 65,000 album discs to hundreds of digital platforms and mobile outlets across the globe. We offer marketing, publicity, physical and digital e-commerce services, licensing opportunities, streaming services, sales support and customer service for all new releases and active catalog titles of Naxos Records and nearly 700 distributed labels. It’s a thriving company, and I really enjoy working there. We’re headquartered in Franklin, Tennessee, just a few miles south of Nashville.

Q. How did you become a mastering engineer?

A. I’d have to say it started out when I was in my teens. Like a lot of guys that age, I loved speakers…and bass! I think my affinity for audio was a bit different from other kids, because instead of listening to music and doing something else while listening, I would just sit myself in front of a home stereo system – the kind with the 10 inch woofers – and just listen. I would take it all in: the way the bass thumped in my chest and how the emotion of a song made me feel. What I didn’t realize was that I was actually doing critical listening, albeit an unprofessional form, but I loved it! Years later, I got my hands on some gear and started recording. One of the first things I did after getting some gear was to edit together entire soundtracks for shows for the performing arts. This included producing narrative pieces, as well. I actually met the girl who later became my wife, pop artist Jessie Kol, when I had the opportunity to record demos for her, when she was a vocal student at the performing arts center my family owned. It was around the time that I began working with my future wife that I realized audio engineering was my career “calling,” so to speak.

A few years later found me living and working in Nashville, Tennessee at one of the publishing arms of Universal Music Publishing Group. My time at Universal was fun, and it involved keeping track of their archives and also working in their studio, running sessions for dozens of songwriters and artists. Universal was where I learned how to “make a record.” The process of producing a record from start to finished was learned during my time there. I would also do engineering work on the side for various Grammy nominated producers, which landed me some credits on a few major label recordings. Throughout working as a recording and mix engineer, and producing a couple EP’s and countless demos for my wife, I was always fascinated with the “art” of mastering. “How do they make it ‘sound better’?” “Does the mastering phase give a recording that ‘punch’ and ‘wow’ or is it the mixing phase, or a combination of both?” Those were all questions that I researched long and hard to find out. In my quest for the answers I learned so much about mastering – what it can do, and what it can’t do.

Mastering seemed like an ideal fit for me for several reasons. I enjoy critical listening—just ask my wife how often I interrupt our conversation to say “do you hear that?” I love music and music production. And I enjoy making things sound “that much better.” There’s a thrill to lending your skill set and wisdom to a creative project in order to help make it all that it can be. You know, bringing out that potential and making it sound that much better. Naxos of America has been a great place for me to practice the art of mastering, by helping them and the labels they distribute to produce a great recording. It’s a fun environment. It doesn’t feel corporate to me. And I’m thankful to have been given a place like Naxos of America, whereby I can master some great music. There’s always plenty to do at Naxos, because we distribute a lot of music globally.

Q. How did you come about to selecting Sceptre S8s?  Was it the company’s reputation, audio quality, specific features, price, other factors?

A. I first saw the Sceptres in TapeOp Magazine. The first thing that caught me was their unique design. Realizing that they were coaxial and time-aligned, I immediately began wondering how in the world PreSonus was pulling that off, and at that price point. I started thinking of how I could get my hands on a pair! A few months down the road, I decided to reach out to PreSonus, and hear for myself what the hype was about.

Q. Have the Sceptres met your expectations?

A. I have to say that before they arrived, I was a bit nervous about hearing these monitors and being disappointed. Not because I’ve heard anything bad about PreSonus, but because I was wondering if they would really deliver, and if they didn’t, how was I going to politely tell PreSonus that I didn’t like them. Haha. Almost immediately, though, I was blown away. An engineer friend of mine, who is also a co-worker, and myself set them up for an A/B session in our company’s listening room. Right away he said that the Sceptres were “punchy.” We were both so excited about them that we brought in our other co-worker, who’s also an engineer. He too, was very impressed with the transient response they have.

The Sceptres are punchy, but when I say “punch,” I’m not referring to bass. I’m referring to the mid, upper-mid, and upper frequencies. The transient response amazed us. Side by side with the competition (who shall remain anonymous, but be assured, was not at all a shabby monitor) – which was an audiophile 8 inch design with air motion tweeter – the transient response, depth, and clarity were obvious. We were playing some classic R&B songs, and instruments that were getting masked over by the competition’s monitors were clearly and beautifully represented by the Sceptres! The difference was night and day! And yes, the Sceptres represent the low end quite well. There’s no disappointment there.

Q. Now that you have been using the S8s for awhile what do you find special about or that you have come to appreciate (regarding frequency response particularly, with how the midrange frequencies are represented, detail, channel spread, etc.,)?  What do you notice in the coaxial delivery?

Put a different way, what features have proven particularly useful and why?

A. As a lot of engineers know, the mid-range frequencies are where the definition, the nuance, the texture, of any audio piece lives. The Sceptres have completely blown me away with how they lay open to expose every little nuance and detail of the music I master, whether it’s classical, jazz, or even a country album. Every instrument comes through. I honestly cannot over emphasize how the Sceptres really shine in allowing me to hear every bit of vital mid-range information. They don’t hype. They simply, effortlessly, and accurately reveal everything that’s there. That in turn, allows me to make any fixes and adjustments that need to be made so Naxos can give the client the best results. Seriously. Listening to the Sceptres is enjoyable. I can’t quite explain why, but the word I would use to describe how the Sceptres reveal the music to the listener would be “effortless.”

Q. Did S8s replace other speakers?

A. Yes!

Q. In the box, or out?

A. My mastering needs allow me to stay primarily ITB (in the box). I enjoy the workflow that being ITB allows.

Q.You mentioned that the S8s are extremely accurate and that it’s hard to believe so, at their price point. Could you embellish that statement?

A. Like I said, it’s amazing what PreSonus has packed into these monitors. I’m still trying to figure out how they’ve come up with such an offering at this price point. They’re not cheap, but they sure are a lot less than I’d expect to pay for something that offers this level of accuracy and imaging.

Q. Any user tips or tricks or interesting stories based on your experience with?  Any war stories you want to share?

A. One thing that I’ve realized about any craft, is that it’s not so much about the tools, but about the person using the tools. Sure, tools are important, but I think in the audio field we’ve gone overboard in believing that simply having the grand converter or pre-amp is what makes a recording sound incredible. I believe that having great gear is very important. But, when I began engineering, I learned how to make recordings sound great with a Mackie 1402, a NanoVerb, and standalone CD recorder. I would produce demos for vocalists. It turns out, they were impressed. That encouraged me to get my first DAW – the original MBOX with Pro Tools. Nothing ultra, but it’s what I was able to get. From there, I produced more demos for vocalists. One of the guys I created a demo for was so impressed that he told me my recording and mix sounded better than the demo that he had shelled out a bunch money for on Music Row a few years earlier. That, for me, was when I started realizing that it’s not so much about the tools, but the engineer – his ear, his understanding of what gives a recording “that” sound.

Again, high quality tools are definitely important, but what precedes that is the understanding and ability of the engineer. My take on it, is that a great engineer can make extraordinary use of minimal gear. Great engineering is also about process, just as much as it is about knowing your tools. There have been countless times when I’ve caught something that needed correcting, simply because the process I use in my approach to mastering a project was being used. In other words, it had little to do with the gear. I believe it’s crucial for an engineer to develop process – a protocol of how you approach and run through a project. Be thorough. Double check your work. Give a QA listen through of that disc or DDP master before you hand it off to the client. Make sure you really got the sequencing correct…for the 3rd time. If you notice something that may seem to be out of place, ask the client if that was their intent.

Q. Any interesting musical projects that you’ve mastered recently?

A. Yes! Definitely! Naxos is always getting interesting projects but aside from that, back in November, Naxos did a re-release of the acclaimed “Jazz at the Pawnshop” album that was recorded live in 1976 at the Jazzpuben Stampen (Pawnshop) in Stockholm, Sweden. That was a fun project to re-master. The history behind it and the fact that it was a re-release of the original 12 track recording made it to be a very exciting re-mastering project for me. Most recently, I’ve just wrapped up mastering a really cool project of the Nashville Symphony. Naxos has put together a “Best Of” project in partnership with the Symphony. It’s called “Live From Music City: The Best of Giancarlo Guerrero and the Nashville Symphony.” The Nashville Symphony and Naxos of America enjoy a great business and creative relationship and we’re both very excited to release this special project in August!

Here’s the details on the above mentioned release:

LIVE From Music City: The Best of Giancarlo Guerrero and the Nashville Symphonyunnamed-2
Cat ID: 9.50141
Composers: Piazzolla; Sierra; Daugherty; Danielpour; Paulus
Artists: Nashville Symphony + Giancarlo Guerrero
Digital Release Date: May 5, 2015
Physical Release Date: August 14, 2015
About: Drawn from seven years’ worth of commissioning and recording projects, Live From Music City captures the full breadth of the Nashville Symphony sound, from Michael Daugherty’s pop-culture inspired tone poems to Roberto Sierra’s fiery, Latin-flavored symphonies. Hear an orchestra that’s truly in tune with its place and time, recorded live at the world-class Schermerhorn Symphony Center.

 

 

 

And here’s details on Ancient Voices, also recently mastered on the Sceptres.

Ancient Voicesunnamed-3
Cat ID: 8.578311-12
Composer: Richard Danielpour
Artists: Hila Plitmann; Nashville Symphony; Giancarlo Guerrero; Pacific Chorale; John Alexander; Pacific Symphony; Carl St. Clair
Digital Release: June 2, 2015
Physical Release: June 9, 2015
About: One of the most sought-after and decorated composers of his generation, Richard Danielpour refers to himself as “an American composer with a Middle Eastern memory”.  His distinctive voice is part of a rich neo-Romantic heritage which includes 20th century American and European composers alike. Darkness in the Ancient Valley, a symphony in five movements inspired by recent events in Iran, utilizes a wide range of Persian folk-melodies and Sufi rhythms.  Toward a Season of Peace is an oratorio which explores violence and war in the name of religion, using the season of spring as a metaphor for change and transformation towards songs of peace through forgiveness.  Danielpour’s insistence on music having “an immediate visceral impact” can be heard throughout his oeuvre, and the beautifully translated Persian poetry and rich spirit of harmony in Toward a Season of Peace make it symbolic of a brighter future for our time.

Studio One 3 Launch: Los Angeles Studio Chat—Part 1 of 3

Studio One 3 Launched on May 20, 2015. Marketing Director Carl Jacobson sat down at Burbank, California’s Legend Studio with a panel of engineers, DJs, and producers including Sak Pase, AG, KATFYR, Chaka Blackmon, and DJ Faust to talk about why they’ve chosen Studio One over other DAWs.

Learn more about Studio One 3 and try the demo here: http://studioone.presonus.com/

 

.@KATFYR’s Latest Release, “Voltage,” Produced in Studio One, Available now on BeatPort

It's got a little kitty on it.

It’s got a little pixel kitty on it.

[This just in from KATFYR, who just released “Voltage“—produced entirely in Studio One! You can (and should) buy Voltage on BeatPort by clicking here. You can also listen to the track below, and check out the video interview to learn a few more details about his production tricks.]

My latest release, Voltage, was produced with Studio One 3 from start to finish. I got to take advantage of many of its newest features.

The new Arranger Track expedited the process of building the entire song structure. It enabled me to easily duplicate whole sections of the arrangement and move them around. The Scratch Pad enabled me to test how different sections interact with each other in order to find the best flow for the track.

I’ve also made good use of the new Effect Splitter feature, particularly in the bus channels for bass and synth sounds, where I was able to pinpoint certain frequencies and apply effects directly to those areas. It would nearly impossible to get the sounds I did using anything else!

 

 

 

 

 

Luke Mornay

.@LukeMornay on Studio One 3 and Creative Comping

Grammy-nominated producer Luke Mornay has been advocating Studio One ever since he made the switch from Cubase a few years ago. Naturally, he got in at the ground floor with Studio One 3. Here’s his thoughts on all things Studio One 3, including Mai Tai, Note FX, and Presence XT. To close it out, he shares a cool trick he calls “Creative Comping.”

 

 

Ilias Gogakis on Studio One

[This just in from Ilias Gogakis, rock and metal producer/mix and mastering engineer at Master Sound Studio and longtime PreSonus user. He recently created some Studio One 3 videos in Greek—the playlist is linked below!]

EliasG

My name is Ilias Gogakis, and I have worked as a mix and mastering engineer for the past five years. I am currently based in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, in the United Kingdom. I am coming from a ten year career in IT, as a network engineer, but I decided to change careers and follow my big passion: music. I have also studied electric guitar and I have the RGT certificate from London College of Music. I was very lucky so far to have two very talented music tutors by my side, Kyriakos Kouvelas and Theodore Ziras. They both helped me to achieve my personal goals, open new horizons and overcome my limits as a guitarist. Today I am enrolled in a the Bucks New University, based in High Wycombe, in a module for Sound Design for Film and TV, as I want to expand my knowledge regarding sound design, surround effects and digital audio technology.

I remember myself as a hardcore Cubase user. But always looking for something better, as I had a feeling that something was missing from the software. My first contact with PreSonus Studio One was back in summer 2011, when I was searching the internet for demos and reviews about modern DAWs. I remember myself reading reviews from SoundOnSound magazine, Gearslutz.com, and all the major webzines, along with videos on YouTube.

I was very interested in testing it as, at that time, I was looking to change my DAW to something more modern. I have to admit that 2011 was the “DAW testing” year for me. I was downloading demos from every company’s website and testing them in order to try them out and look if there is that little something that would make me say “Yes, this is it. Now let’s start make some music—easy, fast, reliable.” I must say that after my friend told me to take a better look at Studio One, there was no turning back.

I remember I downloaded the demo for version 2 back in the day, installed in, and that was the beginning. Since I was a Cubase user, the key commands where similar, and the workflow was about 40% faster. I have to admit that I opened the manual only three times, just to change some options and see some new features, and fine-tune some advanced setting regarding my interface. Since that day, I use Studio One every day in my mixes. One of the great features that I really like is the integrated Project Page for mastering. It is a very helpful project page that helps me go back and forth in the mix and make instant changes to my master files. In my mixes I use OpenAir reverb and the Analog Delay on every song, and all the modulation effects such us chorus, flanger and the Redlight Distortion often find their place in my mixes. Also, the stock PreSonus ProEQ is a very good parametric EQ to make tonality changes to any instrument during my mixing sessions, and can be very helpful for mastering. Some other tools that I use every day in my mixes are the Slate Digital and Eiosis tools. These analog emulation tools they just sound amazing, and they work flawlessly with Studio One.

In conclusion, PreSonus Studio One in version 2 was an amazing production system—and version 3 is more mature, with many improvements. It’s more stable, more virtual instruments, and more new functions, which really helps you in your daily workflow, no matter how you use the software, recording, mixing or mastering.

Find out more about my work at the following links:

 

Greek Studio One videos: