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Category Archives: Artist


Studio One 4 User, James Reynolds, at the Top of the Charts!

Currently sitting in the no.1 and no.2 slot on the USA iTunes Charts are two songs mixed by mix engineer, music producer and songwriter James Reynolds who also is a Studio One user!

As a huge fan of the DAW, Reynolds worked with us on the development of the new Studio One 4, and it’s his go-to DAW for many reasons.

Reynolds was recently interviewed for Sound on Sound Magazine. Check out some of the article here. Here are just a few things he had to say about Studio One:

“I was on Cubase for a while, and then I switched to Logic. I stayed in Logic for a long time, rather than moving to Pro Tools, because I found Logic more creative. But when I discovered Studio One I really liked it, and today it is absolutely perfect!”

“Pro Tools and Studio One are very similar, because Studio One is designed to make it very easy to convert to for Pro Tools users, who would find it a piece of cake. Where it differs is in the drag‐and‐drop workflow, which is super‐fast. You have a sidebar with all your plug‐ins listed in your folders, and you just pull a plug‐in on the channel or the bus, and it will set up the routing for you. It is designed to be super‐quick. It has also taken a leaf out of Ableton’s book, so all your samples can be previewed real‐time and will automatically loop in time. Plus it has gone next level, for example in that you can create splits of your plug‐in signals within your channels. So let’s say you have a lead vocal, and you want to do a parallel bus for it within that channel, you do the split inside the plug‐in, and this gives you a lot of control very easily. It is all very well thought‐out and the automation is fantastic, and so is the MIDI.”

 

Click here to read more

Here’s more on what he has to say on Studio One. He’s basically the expert.

One more thing…. BTS’s latest release “IDOL” mixed by James, now holds the record for the biggest music video debut in YouTube’s history with over 45 million views in the first 24 hours! So that’s awesome.

Huge congrats to James and we’re so stoked for your success! Keep up with his success here.

Join the Studio One family here!

Friday Tip: Back to the 60s with Preverb

Reverse audio was a common technique back in the days when doing it was a challenge (flipping tape reels over, recording, flipping them back). Now that reverse audio is easy to do, it’s uncommon…go figure. But let’s revive reverse audio with preverb—reverb that swells up to a sound, instead of decaying after it. We’ll first look at a method that requires having some silence before the clip to which you want to add preverb, then cover what to do if the clip starts at the beginning of a song. Note: the screen shot shows each step, but you’ll end up with only the two yellow clips to create preverb—the other clips are for illustration only (i.e., you don’t need to keep copying the clip).

 

Step 1. Start by copying the clip or track to which you want to add preverb. Use the Paint tool to draw a silent section in front of the copied clip that’s equal to or longer than the anticipated reverb decay tail you’ll add in the next step, then bounce the silent part and the copied clip together. Tip: Consider rolling off some of the low end on the copy so the kick is less prominent. Kicks don’t get along with reverb all that well, and preverb is no exception.

 

Step 2. Select the bounced clip and type Ctrl+R, or right-click and choose Audio > Reverse Audio. Insert your reverb of choice (the Open Air 480 Hall preset from Halls > Medium Halls is a good place to start) into the copied/reversed track or clip, then set the reverb’s Mix control to 100% for an all-wet mix.

 

Step 3. After your reverb sound is as desired, right-click on this clip and choose Mixdown Selection. This clip contains only the reverb sound.

 

Step 4. Reverse this clip, and now you’ll preverb when you play it along with the original clip. You can also try nudging the preverb left or right to play with the timing—for example if the reverb has pre-delay, the kick and reverberated kick might argue with each other.

 

To add preverb before the entire song starts so that the preverb leads up to the first sound, select all tracks and shift them to the right to open up a few measures at the song’s beginning. Now you can extend the copy of the track or clip you want preverbed to the project start so it includes silence. Continue by copying the original track, reversing, and following the steps detailed previously to add preverb, then shift the tracks back to the their original position.

 

To hear preverb in a musical context, go to https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/craiganderton and click on the free preview of song 2, “The Gift of Goodbye.” The preverb is on the guitar solo toward the middle of the song and then occurs again at the end, during the fadeout.

 

The Latest Banging Add-Ons in the PreSonus Shop!

Click here for more!

New from PreSonus – Tom Brechtlein Drum Loops

Tom Brechtlein is a drummer’s drummer—a seasoned vet with a versatile skill set that is evidenced by the broad array of talent that has chosen to work with him. Tom’s client list boasts names like Chick Corea, Wayne Shorter, Jean-Luc Ponty, Christopher Cross, and Robben Ford. So when it came time for us to make a diverse drum library that could serve nearly any need of our user base, Tom was our first call.
The result of Tom’s sessions? He pulled out all the stops: Delivering brutal rock grooves, sludgy blues, Louisiana-worthy funk, and tasty jazz and fusion licks that will quickly make this library your secret weapon.
Available in Stereo and HD Multitrack editions. Both include over 320 loops, two kits for Impact, and unique Double Drum loops for synchronized two-drummer sounds!

Get Tom Brechtlein’s Drums HERE! 

 

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Did you know the PreSonus family tree has some Irish roots?

St Patrick.

Everyone has heard the story of Saint Patrick—the patron saint that came to Ireland in the AD 400s and converted Ireland to Christianity. Each year on the 17th of March, it appears that everyone has a little bit of Irish in them when St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated! This is especially true here at PreSonus, where we can proudly say we have our own Irish relations based in Co. Cavan where our EMEA office PreSonus Europe Limited is based.

Two well-established Irish bands who have recently started using PreSonus gear are Le Boom and The Lost Brothers. We will be tracking their progress with them over the coming months… but see a quick intro into both bands below.

Le Boom

Le Boom is an indie-electro-house-pop duo based in Dublin, Ireland. They are known for their energetic live performances which feature a frenzy of glass-bottle beats, layered loops, catchy vocal hooks and sweaty fans who dance like no other fans in the world. Their song, “What We Do,” has featured in a number of ad campaigns for TV. According to the US’ Paste Magazine, Le Boom are “Breaking into America in a big way.”

Le Boom use a PreSonus Quantum thunderbolt interface in their live shows and in the studio. Learn more about them at their website. 

“I recently started using Quantum in our live shows to run my drum samples through VST effects in real time. The lightning-fast latency is essential for this to go smoothly. So far I’ve been really impressed and the drivers have been rock solid.” —Aimie, Le Boom


The Lost Brothers

Irish band The Lost Brothers are Oisin Leech from Meath and Mark Mccausland from Omagh. They have just released their fifth album to huge critical acclaim. In 2018 they tour UK, Ireland, Australia, and the US. 

“With emotionally wrenching and confessional songwriting they have the remarkable ability of making a large room feel very intimate indeed. With a masterful blend of careful songwriting and tuneful harmonies, the Lost Brothers make a lasting impact.”
—The Huffington Post (live review)

Oisin of the lost brothers uses a Studio 68 interface to record demos in his home studio and while on the road.

“I just started out using the PreSonus Studio 68 and Studio One to record demos at home. I love the great clear sound from the XMAX preamps, and Studio One’s workflow has been really easy to adapt to.” – Oisin, The Lost Brothers

 

 





 

 

A Hockey Stick and a StudioLive Leap into a Studio…

The one and only Leo from Frog Leap Studios shares metal covers, tutorials, how-to videos and other fun, super rad stuff with his audience of over 2.3 MILLION subscribers. He’s also a PreSonus user! We recently caught up with Leo at NAMM this year and partnered with him for his next adventure, the StudioLive 32 Series III!

Watch him open and set up his new StudioLive and then make music with a Hockey Stick… yep!

 

Leo and Rick at NAMM!

How to Record Drums Underwater

A couple of weeks ago Dominik Scherer posted this amazing video of him drumming live underwater. He used a Studio 192 for the tracking, and an RML16AI and FaderPort 8 for the production.  I had never heard or seen anything quite like it, and while the video is plenty interesting on its own, I reached out to Dominik to answer a few more questions about some of the unique challenges when one chooses to record drums aquatically. As if tracking live drums on dry land wasn’t difficult enough…

What microphones were used?
1x DPA 8011 hydrophone, mounted over a rack right at center of the drumset.

What sort of waterproofing was required?
We used acrylic drums and made them water proof. I also got water proof in Ear systems from In Ear Germany.
And we designed light sticks that were waterproof with Rohema Percussion.

 Did the drums require any special care/tuning?
We tuned the drums very high and tuned the snares upside down to get a nice snare wire sound. I also used the wires for “scratching” sounds.

What sort of post-processing of the recording was required, if any?
We did some compressing and EQing as also some side chain processing with special delay sounds and room emulations to get a very special and unique sound.

What challenges came up that you didn’t expect?
Well – actually everything was a challenge. First of all I never used oxygen to dive. So I was very afraid of the effect it would have and if I could play with it. Playing underwater is completely different. You gotta plan every movement exactly and do a perfect stroke to hit the drum or the cymbal at the right time. And the pressure under water and the flowing body makes it even harder. As I always do no edits on my videos as far as the drum takes go, I had to play it all as a one take. That was really hard to stay focused, play perfectly and also try to perform in a visually good way… We also did a quite nice making-of video. Click here to watch it on Facebook.

Big thanks to Dominik for making this happen. Some drummers work hard and really go the extra mile… but this is the first time I’ve seen a drummer go an extra nautical mile. 

 

 

It’s Micah Blouin for #PreSonusFAMFriday

Hopefully today’s #PreSonusFAMFriday feature will teach you a little something…

It’s our Education Market Manager, Micah Blouin. You may have met him at a trade show, workshop, or most recently at InfoComm 2017, where you may have had a good laugh and then walked away a little smarter. He knows a lot about a lot of things and today we learn a little about him and his favorite PreSonus product, Notion.

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How long have you worked for PreSonus?
Five years. I started off in Product Management and then moved into Marketing Dept and then Sales and then Education…. Next thing you know, they’ll be asking me to mop the floors.

What’s your official job title?
Currently, Education Market Manager.
What’s your favorite thing about your job?
Teaching teachers about music technology. Training workshops, direct one on one and through our Music Education site.
What do you love about Notion?
I love a lot of things about Notion. First, I love how great it sounds… It’s quick to learn and use. Notion is flexible, meaning I can work with it on my computer, iPad or iPhone, and share over iCloud. It’s really easy to integrate into my workflow.

What was the first 8 track, cassette, CD, digital download you purchased?

The first thing I remember purchasing was MC Hammer’s Please Hammer Don’t Hurt ‘Em on cassette.

What’s your side hustle?
I play drums in a band called Minos the Saint. Maybe you have heard of us…  I also am the orchestra director at Istrouma Baptist Church, where I do some drumming, conducting, and arranging (using Notion). I also do a lot of work with soloists and groups in the area, whether it be side-man drumming, engineering, mixing, or producing.

What other products do you have?

All of them…. haha. I use ADL700, ADL600, Studio One, RML32, Studio One remote, Central Station Plus, Temblor 10, Eris 5, Eris 8, Sceptre 8, FaderPort, Air 12.

Why did you choose Notion as your favorite?

As an educator, Notion is the easiest and most fun product to teach others. You can do so much with it and it helps your workflow—more on that later. I like sharing that with others.

Tell us about a successful event you worked.

I attend education conferences year-round and work one-on-one with teachers to find the best solution for their instructional, rehearsal and performance spaces.

What are you currently working on–What’s next for you?

In the summer, music educators and students are involved in many music camps, marching band activities, and Drum & Bugle Corps tours. PreSonus provides the on-the-field reinforcement for The Blue Devils, The Phantom Regiment, Spirit of Atlanta, and many other successful competitive programs. Marching groups these days have significantly more audio technology requirements, whether it be scenes, routing, or remote control. I’m working with them to ensure groups have an easy-to-use, powerful, and flexible solution that fits their needs.

Got some tips?

The power of Notion is in the simplicity of the workflow and the flexibility to use it across multiple devices. The graphic display appears very sleek, but it’s a very powerful notation program, with some surprisingly quick engraving tools. My first tip is to learn the keyboard shortcuts on a computer, which are super intuitive (q=quarter note, d=dot, <=crescendo, #=sharp). On a computer/laptop or iPad, I suggest the handwriting feature, which enables you to write directly on the score with a mouse, finger, stylus or the Apple Pencil.

Anything else you want to share?

Notion is tightly integrated with Studio One. Sometimes, the classical musician in me wants to compose in Notion, then send the score to Studio One (I simply click “Send to Studio One”), where I can then use Studio One to produce tracks around my score. Other times, I’d prefer to write a song on guitar and vocals, and then “Send to Notion” so I can write scoring around my song.

Notion is available at a discounted price for Studio One owners: $49 for Studio One Professional users and $99 for Studio One Artist users.Micah Blouin

Click here for more info and to purchase Notion!

Butcher Babies and the StudioLive CS18AI and RM32AI at Ozzfest Meets Knotfest in 2016!

BBabiesWatch!

Jason Klein, bassist of the Butcher Babies, tells us about how the band is using the PreSonus CS18AI & RM32AI systems for both their in-ear monitoring system as well as multi-track recording of their live shows via Capture and Studio One—all happening at Ozzfest Meets Knotfest 2016.

Learn more about the StudioLive Mix Systems here!

 

 

 

 

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Hay Bale Studio Relies on StudioLive 32 and Studio One at Bonnaroo

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Photos by Anthony Matula

Most of time, you can find Elijah “Lij” Shaw at his Toy Box Studios in Nashville,

where the Grammy Award winner engineers and produces projects in a wide variety of musical genres. But every year, when the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival rolls around, Shaw and his team decamp for Manchester, home of the festival. There, behind the main stage, they soundproof their double-wide mobile recording trailer with 500 hay bales.

In this once-a-year Hay Bale Studio at Brigadoon—er, Bonnaroo—Shaw and his team record dozens of bands that will appear at the festival. The performances are fed to more than 40 radio markets around the USA.

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Photos by Anthony Matula

For the 2017 Bonnaroo, Hay Bale Studio offered more capabilities than ever before, as Shaw mixed on the new PreSonus StudioLive 32 Series III digital console/recorder, while his team captured the tracks and main mix in PreSonus’ popular Studio One 3 Professional DAW.

“The StudioLive 32 allowed us to bring in all 24 inputs from the recording floor, so we could record a full band. We’re recording in multitrack to Studio One using the console’s AVB audio interface, which can send and return up to 55 streams over one CAT5 Ethernet cable,” says Shaw.

Shaw mixes live while the band is performing, a job made much easier by the StudioLive 32 Fat Channel signal-processing section’s customizable user interface. “I’ve got compressors and EQ on every channel,” Shaw specifies, “and the customizable Fat Channel lets me create my own layout so I can quickly access the processing I want when mixing. I can bring in four onboard effects processors for reverb and delay, and I also patch in my outboard spring reverb. I use Tap Tempo on the mixer to ensure the timing of the delay effects works with what the band is playing.”

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Photos by Anthony Matula

PreSonus’ FlexMix feature also has proven useful. “I choose a FlexMix, and the entire mixer configuration changes and shows me what’s going on with that FlexMix,” instructs Shaw. Using the StudioLive 32’s aux sends, Shaw and team send four custom headphone cue mixes. “We send the cue mixes to the PreSonus HP4, which is a great, simple 4-channel headphone box that is really loud,” he avers. “We have two people with iPads running UC Surface software to control the monitor mixes.”

Main engineer Michael Hardesty also is equipped with UC Surface but he’s running it on a laptop. “Anything Lij can do on the mixer, I can do just as well in the software. My main goal is to set preamps and compressors and do the gain staging so I can get the multitrack feeds recorded properly in Studio One. I am also taking a print of the mix but generally I’m working with individual tracks. I also help with headphone mixes,” Hardesty observes.

With UC Surface, it’s possible to control the mixer from multiple devices at the same time. “That means you can give people different responsibilities,” Hardesty explains. “You also can lock out functions on particular devices; the iPad guys on the recording floor can only control the aux sends for the headphone mixes, while my laptop has complete control of the StudioLive 32.”

The live stereo mix goes straight to mastering engineer Joe Hutchinson. “Joe makes the radio mix sound fantastic,” enthuses Shaw. “He also uses Studio One to capture the performance in stereo. So we’re capturing bands through the StudioLive 32, mixing and mastering, and putting it out to more than 40 radio markets—all within an hour of each performance, with two or three songs for each band every hour.”

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Thanks to the feature-packed, versatile StudioLive 32 and the power and speed of Studio One, Hay Bale Studio had entirely new capabilities at the 2017 Bonnaroo. “The customizable mixing surface, plenty of processing, wireless remote control, recording features, and ease of use let us do things we could never do at a dozen previous Bonnaroos,” confirms Shaw, “and it all sounded great. “We loved using the StudioLive 32, and we’re very happy with Studio One. Bonnaroo is a highlight of our year, and PreSonus helped make it extra special this year. We hope you’ll visit our site and check out some of the recordings!”

Watch Lij demo and show off their StudioLive 32 here:

 

For more information about Hay Bale Studio, please visit www.thetoyboxstudio.com/haybalestudio

Listen to their latest podcast from Bonnaroo HERE!

For more information about PreSonus, the StudioLive 32 console/recorder, Studio One 3 DAW, and the HD4 headphone amplifier, please visit www.presonus.com.

 

Photography provided by Anthony Matula with MA2LA Design.

Introducing Adam Brandon for #PreSonusFAMFriday

Fridays are awesome…

It’s the start of the weekend and everyone is in a good mood. Every other Friday is a payday, so there’s money in the bank… and it’s #PreSonusFAMFriday where we introduce you to an employee who’s also a PreSonus fan and user. Catch up on who you’ve missed so far on Instagram and check out today’s featured employee, Adam Brandon! He has two first names and loves audio stuff like his StudioLive RML32AI! Check out his quick interview below!

Adam_Brandon

  • How long have you worked for PreSonus?

I’ve worked 6 years in July.

  •  What’s your official job title?
Live Sound Division Contractors Support Representative.
  • What’s your favorite thing about your job?

There is nothing better than helping someone get a system up and running and learning that we both are addicted to the same things – mixing audio and making music.

  • What was the first 8 track, cassette, CD, digital download you purchased?

Metallica “Reloaded” (CD)

  • Everyone has a side job, what’s yours?

I own a sound/lighting company and do live sound, design/installation, and optimizations.

  • What do you love about the StudioLive RML?

It fits so well in so many situations, that all I do is get a router, a Firewire cable and my Mac/iPad.  Couldn’t be easier.

  • What other products do you have?

I have a StudioLive Series III 32 and 16 in my live sound inventory and love them.

  • Tell us about a successful event you worked.
Recently complete live sound for Peace Fest 2017, where I mixed 3-4 bands on a single console with a CS18AI side stage and an iPad for FOH.
  • What are you currently working on?
I will be setting up for an annual event called “The Big Chill” outside of Baton Rouge where I’ll be putting 12 XL1 Worx Audio Speakers (6 per side) and 4 subs on a stage for 1-2,000 people for July 4th celebrations.  Should be a fun time!
  • What’s next for you?

Planning to expand my business and continue to serve our PreSonus Customers as best I can.

  • Got some tips you wanna share?
Do not give up on spending the time/effort to do what you love.  The work you put forth will always return a reward you never thought possible.