PreSonus Blog

Check out this great video from session drummer and recordist Luis Hernandez on using the ADL 700 and Studio One to record a jingle for HBO Latino. If you’re looking for some workhorse secrets from a guy who’s working in music full-time, don’t miss it! Luis shares some of the secrets of his signal chain, and some of his favorite EQ settings for using the ADL 700 on kick and snare—particularly as it pertains to filtering high-hat sounds from his snare mic.

Be sure to give Luis a subscription on YouTube by clicking here.

Category Studio One | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Check out this great video from SoundPure Studios, they’ve produced an incredible overview and demonstration of the ADL 700. And as if that wasn’t enough, the video features an amazing performance. Win-win!

Category ADL 700 | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Compression is an oft-misunderstood and sometimes over-used effect that enjoys (?) a wealth of online forum punditry. Sonic Sense has done an exemplary job here in plainly illustrating the rudiments of compression while cutting the crap. This video begins by demonstrating exactly what the basic compressor controls do, and then follows up with audible examples of the compressor being applied during tacking AND in a full mix, so you can very clearly hear the effect applied in the context of a full song. Demos include vocals, snare, and bass.

Thanks to Sonic Sense for not only clearing up some of the mysteries of compression, but also for choosing the ADL 700 as the right tool for the job.

Category Uncategorized | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Taylor Nauta consistently sounds great, and we felt that the ADL 700 and ADL 600 preamps would really do his tones justice. So, we invited him by the new HQ, brought him to the live room, and recorded a few tracks.

Taylor’s voice is running through the ADL 700, and his guitar is recorded through a direct input into the first channel of the ADL 600, as well as by a mic run into the second channel.

Category PreSonus LIVE | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Bass Extremists Victor Wooten and Steve Bailey bring the low end like no other, and when paired up, it’s a sonic maelstrom of intergalactic proportions. Both are running their basses directly into ADL 700s for this performance.

For more on the ADL 700, click here.

Category ADL 700 | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Guido Craveiro, who is taking his StudioLive on the road with his band, Maxim!]

Hey PreSonus! 

I’ve been using  my StudioLive 24.4.2 for monitoring, and we just got another for front of house.  We did the entire October Maxim  tour with both consoles!
I recorded this performance using all 24 tracks, which I mixed later at home in-studio. The main vocal and bass are both run through the ADL 700. Wishing you all the best and a good entrance to 2014!

 

Category StudioLive | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Recording a guitarist with as signature a technique as Steve Dodds introduces some unusual recording quandaries. Fortunately for 5aint, his PreSonus AL 700, ADL 600, StudioLive digital mixer, and Studio One DAW provided everything he needed for the task at hand.

Dodds’ signature “guitabla” stylings are in high demand, as he has been a prolific session player and frequent collaborator with the likes of Steven Stills, Sarah McLachlan, Karen Eden, and more, having worked on projects with notable producers like David Kershenbaum, Jill Joes, Alan Moulder, and Martin Page. His more recent focus has been on his dynamic, genre-blending solo material.

 

Category Studio One | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



PreSonus was proud to be a part of the 2013 ASCAP Songwriters Retreat, held September 25th to October 4th at the 14th-century Château Marouatte in the Dordogne region of France—an inspiring place for the lyrically inclined.

And that’s the point. ASCAP has designed this retreat to bring out the best in talented writers. This year’s 30+ participants were divided into different groups, every day, to write and record, keeping collaborative spirits fresh and healthy. At the end of the session, attendees return home with renewed artistic vigor, their hearts and hard drives full of song.

In fact, a dozen of the songs written at the camp this year are already on hold for major label artists, including The Temper Trap, Kelly Clarkson, Melanie Fiona, Nylo, Jessie Malakouti, and Jon Bellion.

PreSonus was happy to provide a metric heap of equipment to foster the creative process, including:

Photos from the event follow, as well as a kind thank-you video from the songwriters themselves. You’re welcome, folks, and we hope you wrote enough hits to fill a 14th-century dining hall. Read more about it here.


 

 

Category StudioLive 16.0.2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



This kind review of our latest golden boy,the ADL 700 tube mic preamp, comes to us from the informed masterminds at Amazona.de. Naturally, this one is written with the German-speaking crowd in mind. If you don’t speak German but DO have Chrome installed, you’ve got a translator built right into your browser to help you out!

Amazona has gone a step above and beyond in this review by not only detailing all the nitty-gritty technical specs, but they’ve also included several audio demos of the ADL 700. Click here to read the review in full and hear it for yourself.

Roughly translated, you’ll find such laudatory praise as “The PreSonus ADL 700 is a professional device that costs less than it sounds. A suitable candidate to compliment a serious outboard collection. Sonically, a big thumbs up.”

Category Review | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Can you really get a great recording of a guitar AND vocal perfomance with just a single mic and a single preamp? Absolutely! That’s how the majority of classic recordings were done back before multitrack recording. The benefits of recording with one really great mic and preamp are twofold:

  • The sound is pure and focused
  • You don’t have to deal with phase issues

With a single-mic setup, you have the ability to make the listener feel like they are literally in the room.   So how do you pull this off? First of all, you need to have a great song and a great performance. If you’ve got one mic or 1000 mics, it won’t matter if the song sucks or the performance isn’t there. Assuming you have your song and performance together, here’s a few tips on how to pull this off using the PreSonus ADL 700 Channel Strip and the Blue Microphones Kiwi. The artist I recorded is the amazing Chris LeBlanc.

 

Mic Positioning:  We’re using Blue Microphones’ Kiwi, a nine-pattern microphone (omni, cardioid, figure of eight, and everything in between) featuring their B6 capsule, to capture as much detail as we can. Most of the time, I set the mic to a cardioid pickup pattern, so it is picking up what’s going on in front of it while rejecting reflections that are coming off of the wall behind the mic. When I’m miking a singer/acoustic guitar player, I try to place the mic far enough away to pick up both the guitar and voice—but not too far, otherwise I will get to much room sound. Once I’ve positioned the mic for the correct distance, the next challenge is to position it vertically to get the correct balance between the singer’s voice and guitar. This is also a bit tricky, as placement is dependent on how loud the artist both sings and plays. On this particular session, Chris’ voice was actually a lot louder than his guitar was. Notice I have the mic actually positioned lower, toward the guitar, to account for this. With the Kiwi, it’s good to experiment by opening up the polar pattern to achieve more omni pickup when trying to capture multiple sources. The flexibility of being able to move in-between cardioid and omni is extremely valuable in these settings!

 

Setting the mic preamp and compressor

The preamp gain was set so that I had plenty of headroom. Chris is a very dynamic singer, and puts out quite a bit of volume, so it was important to make sure I didn’t let him clip the input of the mic preamp. The ADL 700 features variable microphone impedance settings, so I set it to the highest impedance available to get a bright, dynamic sound. The High Pass Filter was disabled, and the compressor was set to a light ratio of about 3:1.  I was getting around 5 or 6dB of compression on the meter. This smoothed out the response, and helped control the inevitable peaks that occur when Chris really belts it out.

Setting the EQ Since the mic was pulled back from Chris by about 1.5 feet, I found I needed to boost some lows around 60k just to bring out the body in his acoustic guitar. Since the guitar was tuned down, the low-mids sounded a little muted, so I boosted a few dB at around 400Hz. Lastly, I added just a tad of highs at around 6kHz to bring out the high-end definition.

 

Point and Shoot That’s it! As you can see from the video, sometimes Chris wasn’t looking directly at the mic, but because I had some distance between him and the Kiwi, it didn’t matter. What you hear is what the performance actually sounded like if you were in the room. The trick with this type of technique is to experiment. It also doesn’t hurt to have a world-class mic and preamp, but nonetheless, it all starts with the source. Experiment—happy tracking!

 

Limited time offer from Blue and PreSonus!

 

Category ADL 700 | 2 Comments »
Posted by RickNaqvi