PreSonus Blog

Monthly Archives: October 2018


Splice now supports Studio One

We’re proud to announce that we’ve partnered with Splice to make it easier for you to backup and share your Studio One project files. Splice Studio now supports Studio One project files—meaning once you’ve downloaded the Splice Studio Desktop application, you’ll be able to automatically back up your project files, access any saved version, and collaborate with others on your tracks!

Click here to learn more and sign up! 

Why Splice?

  • Smarter Backup: Automatically back up every version of your project, without using up hard drive space. It’s secure, reliable, and free.
  • Collaborate Anywhere: Work with other artists on the same project files. See the changes they make when they make them.
  • Go Back to Any Version: Experiment without consequences. Splice remembers. Go back in time at any time.

 

Friday Tips: Rhythmic Reverb Splashes

Summer may be over in the northern hemisphere, but we can still splash around. This is one of those “hiding in plain sight” kind of tips, but it’s pretty cool.

The premise: Sometimes you don’t want reverb all the time, so you kick up the send control to push something like a snare hit into the reverb for a quick reverb “splash” (anyone who’s listened to my music knows this is one of my favorite techniques). The reverb adds a dramatic emphasis to the rhythm, but is short enough that it doesn’t wear out its welcome—listen to the audio example, which demos this technique with Studio One’s Crowish Acoustic Chorus 1 drum loop.

 

However, although this technique is great with drums, it also works well with rhythm guitar, hand percussion, synths, you name it… even kick works well in some songs. I’m not convinced about bass, but aside from that, this has a lot of uses.

 

Studio One offers an easy way to produce regular splashes automatically (like on the second and fourth beats of a measure, where an emphasizing element hits). Insert X-Trem before the reverb, select 16 Steps as the “waveform,” click Sync, and choose your rhythm. The screenshot shows Beats set to 1/2 so that the reverb splash happens on 2 and 4, which in the case of the audio example, adds reverb to the snare on 2, and to the closed high-hat on 4.

And that’s pretty much it. Because the reverb is in a bus, set Mix to 100%. The 480 Hall from Halls > Medium Halls is one of my faves for this application, but hey… use whatever ’verb puts a smile on your face.

Friday Tips: Multiband Dynamics for Bass? Yes!

I’m not one of those people who wants to do heavy compression all the time, but I do feel bass is an exception. Mics, speakers, and rooms tend to have response anomalies in the bass range; even if you’re using bass recorded direct, compression can help even out the response for a smoother, rounder sound.

Although stereo compressors are the usual go-to for bass, I often prefer a multiband dynamics processor because it can serve simultaneously as a compressor and EQ. Typically, I’ll apply a lot of compression to the lowest band (crossover below 200 Hz or so), light compression to the low-mid bands (as well as reduce their levels in the overall mix), and medium compression to the high-mid band (from about 1.2 kHz to 6 kHz). I often turn down the level for the band above 5-6 kHz or so (there’s not a lot happening up there with bass anyway), but sometimes I’ll set a ratio below 1.0 so that the highest band turns into an expander. If there’s any hiss in the very highest band, this will help reduce it. Another advantage of using Multiband Dynamics is that you can tweak the high and low band gain parameters so that the bass fits well with the rest of the tracks.

The preset in the following screenshot gives a sound like “Tuned Thunder,” thanks to heavy compression in the lowest band. To choose a loop that’s good for demoing this sound, choose Rock > Bass > Clean, and then select 08 02 P Ransack D riff.audioloop. Insert the Multiband Dynamics processor, and start with the default preset.

As with most dynamic processing presets, the effect is highly dependent on the input level. For this preset, normalize the bass loop. Then change the L band to 125 Hz, with a ratio of 15:1, and a Low Threshold of -30 dB. Mute the LM band.

With the Multiband Dynamics processor bypassed, observe the peak value for the bass track. Now enable Multiband Dynamics, and adjust the Low band’s Gain until the peak value matches the peak value with the Multiband Dynamics bypassed-—you’ll hear a big, fat, round sound that sort of tunnels through a mix.

 

Now let’s go to the other extreme. A significant treble boost can help a bass hold its own against other tracks, because the ear/brain combination will fill in the lower frequencies. The next screen shot shows settings for extreme articulation so the bass really “pops,” and cuts through a track. Again, start with the default preset but set the Low band frequency to 110 Hz or so.

The only band that’s compressed is the Mid band (320 – 1.2 kHz, with parameter settings shown in the screen shot). A bit of gain for the High Mid band emphasizes pick noise and harmonics—5 dB or so seems about right—and to compensate for the extra highs, add some gain to the low band below 110 Hz. Again, about 4-5 dB seems to work well.

When adjusting the Multiband Dynamics processor, note that you can zero in on the exact effect you want for each band by using the Solo and Mute buttons on individual stages. So next time you want to both compress and equalize bass, consider using Multiband Dynamics instead—and get the best of both worlds.

Recording in Studio One Made Easy with David Vignola!

Learn Studio One from David Vignola!

This series is intended for first-time owners of the AudioBox and Studio One Artist and covers everything you will need to know to record your first song. Hit the ground running!

And when you’re ready for the Advanced course, hit up David at his website and get a discount with promo code: PRESONUS25

Watch the whole video series here:

 

Learn more about the AudioBox here! 

 

Not sure which interface works for you? Well help you find one here!

Studio One Remote 1.4 Available Now

Studio One Remote 1.4 has been released and is now available on the App Store, Google Play Store and from our website (Windows version). This update offers additional support for Studio One 4, as well as various bug fixes and performance improvements. Studio One Remote is free, and so is this update.
A special highlight of Studio One Remote is the user-configurable Commands Page with access to any keyboard shortcut or macro! When used with the new MIDI editing commands and shortcuts available in Studio One 4, Studio One Remote turns into a secret weapon for composers and electronic musicians. Of course, it’s just as useful for recording musicians who need to control Studio One transport or mixer when away from the computer.
 

New in version 1.4:

  • Support for Studio One 4 dark and light UI themes (selectable from the Start Page)
  • Updated mixer graphics
  • Several bugfixes and performance improvements

Download here:

Friday Tips: Pumping Drums—With No Sidechain!

The “pumping” effect is a cool EDM staple that also works with other intense forms of music. One of the best-known examples is Eric Prydz’s seminal EDM track from 2004, “Call on Me.” Usually, this technique requires sidechaining, but with the PreSonus Compressor sidechain filter, we’re covered. The effect works best if there are some sustaining sounds with which it can work—like cymbals for drum parts, or pads if you want to pump a non-drum track. Listen to the audio example to hear how the pumping effect alters a drum track.

 

 

To start, let’s try pumping some drums. Insert the Compressor in the track, and click on the Compressor’s Filter and Listen Filter buttons. To have the kick create the signal that provides the pumping, set the Lowcut frequency to off, and lower the Highcut filter until you hear pretty much nothing but kick. Once you’ve isolated the kick (or snare, or whatever you want to isolate), turn off Listen Filter but leave Filter on.

The control settings are quite crucial; the screenshot shows some potential initial settings, but you’ll need to edit the controls based on the source audio and the desired effect.

 

The effect’s depth, like any compression effect, depends on the Threshold and Ratio settings. For a pretty heavy-duty effect, set Threshold between -20 and -30 dB and Ratio around 10. You’ll want to tweak this depending on the program material, but it’s a good place to start.

Now for the pumping. Start with Attack at minimum, and set Release for the desired amount of pumping—you’ll probably want a time between 100 and 300 ms, depending on the song and the material. To restore some of the attack at the start of the pumping, increase the Attack time. Even a little bit, like 5 ms, restores most of the attack’s effect.

Finally, note that because this effect does in fact compress, you’ll probably want to add some makeup gain. And once you do, there you have it—the pumping sound.

Get the Channel Strip Collection FREE when You Purchase a Studio-Series Interface!

Starting today through the end of 2018, get the Channel Strip Collection FREE when you buy a Studio-Series recording system! It’s like Happy Thanksgiving, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year all at once.

Interfaces included for the promo:

  • Studio 192
  • Studio 1824
  • Studio 1810
  • Studio 68
  • Studio 26
  • Studio 24

Here’s the deal–the Channel Strip Collection is valued at $80 and it’s yours FREE when you purchase one of these interfaces. Once you purchase the interface, the Channel Strip will automatically be added to your my.PreSonus account upon hardware registration.

Here’s everything you want to know about the Channel Strip Collection from Studio One Expert:

 

This offer is available worldwide.

  • Click here to find a dealer in the US.
  • Click here to find a dealer outside of the US.

 

 

 

 

 

FREE Monitor Station V2 with Purchase of R-Series Monitors!

Starting today and ending December 31, score a FREE Monitor Station V2 when you purchase a pair of the R-Series Studio Monitors!

Here’s a little about the R-Series:

The R65 and R80 feature a custom Air Motion Transformer (AMT) tweeter that responds to the subtlest waveforms and the highest frequencies. This allows you to hear the “air” and the greater sense of space that is characteristic of audiophile recordings. The R series’ transparent and highly accurate sound makes them ideal for use in both commercial and home recording studios as well as broadcast and post-production environments.

Recently, Magnetic Magazine reviewed the Monitor Station V2 and gave it a 10/10!!

It does exactly what it’s supposed to, and it executes it perfectly. It’s simple to use and fits perfectly into your current setup. It works so well, that you pretty much forget what it’s like not to have it. That’s when you know you have a real winner. And, it won’t break your bank. What more could one ask for?

Read the whole review here. 

 

 

 

 

Just fill out the rebate and your Monitor Station will be home in no time!

 Click here for the rebate form

Introducing the HD9 PRO PACK with a Special Introductory Price!

New Month, New PROMOS!

Let’s discuss things that come in packs:

  • Wolves
  • Pens
  • Guitar picks
  • Hot-dog buns

Also, most importantly, the NEW HD9 and HP4 Pro PACK! Let us introduce you to the latest Pack in the PreSonus Family!

Here’s what you get for $349.00!

  • Four Studio-Grade HD 9 Headphones
    • These headphones are no joke! They are comfortable, CLEAR and accurate! AND you get FOUR with this pack!
    • These guys were actually selected as an Editor’s Choice by Music Inc. Magazine at Summer NAMM 2018 (pg. 66)!
  • One HP4 Headphone Amp
    • The perfect companion to the HD9s– the sound is clear and clean, with a wide dynamic range and everyone will be able to hear!
  • ALL THIS IS A $420.00 VALUE! 

This is a Pack you gotta join.

This offer is available worldwide at this special introductory price!

  • Click here to find a dealer in the US.
  • Click here to find a dealer outside of the US.