PreSonus Blog

Friday Tip: Reverb Chord Progressions? Why Not!

The more I play with Harmonic Editing, the more I find it can do things I never expected. Check this out…
One very useful Studio One feature is being able to record a track output into another track’s input. I take advantage of this sometimes by recording effects like reverb or envelope filter (set to effect sound only) into a track. This allows using Inspector features like transpose and delay, as well as have easier control during the mix.

 

So imagine my surprise when I set the reverb-only track to follow the Chord Track—and ended up with a tuned reverb chord progression! The following audio example gets the point across. The first four measures have the original reverb sound, the second four measures have the reverb processed by the Chord Track…pretty amazing.

 

 

There’s one caution: The only Follow chords mode that works for this is Universal. The Tune Mode doesn’t seem to matter, so I just use Default.

 

Extra bonus coolness tip! Drums can follow the Chord Track, again in Universal Mode, for a “drumcoded” effect (i.e., similar to drums “vocoding” something like a pad). Although there’s no way to do a wet/dry balance of the melodic and non-melodic components, you can copy the track, have only the copy follow the Chord Track, and adjust the mix between the dry and Chord-Track-following track.

 

The mind boggles.

  • Craig Anderton

    Last night I needed to lay down a keyboard part on a song and didn’t have much time. I created a chord track and just played away, paying attention only to the timing. The Chord Track fixed the wrong notes, but then I went in and overdubbed some additional phrases. It saved a lot of time, and I ended up with a part that really made me happy. And don’t forget to try the Chord Track with drum loops – it’s freakishly cool.

  • Pablo Sorribes Bernhard

    Damn, that’s cool stuff! That chord-track feature really makes me consider upgrading from v3