PreSonus Blog

PreSonus LIVE Airs Today, Aug. 15! | Sell the Show After the Show! | 2 p.m. CST / 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST / 20:00 UK / 21:00 EU

http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive

Category StudioLive | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



PreSonus Artist Ivan “Vigilante” Munoz has a new track available via Nimbit, all produced in Studio One, of course. Click here to get the new song: http://www.nimbitmusic.com/vigilante

In addition to being a globe-trotting industrial torchbearer, Ivan is also pretty darn good at Photoshop, and sent us this nice homage to his second musical love: The AudioBox Studio!

From his press release:

After the success of his last Album, “The New Resistance” (Including guest artists from bands like Public Enemy, Clawfinger, Hanin Elias, Die Krupps and many more) Ivan Muñoz aka Vigilante is back with a new single called “It’s Our Time”. With this new single Vigilante continues to evolve his hybrid electronic/metal sound adding elements of Dubstep and EDM creating a powerful and refreshing new style called “Industep”. “It’s Our Time” was released on July 4th, including many remixes by great artists from all over the world – XPQ- 21, Consumer Junk/Must We Unite, T3RR0R 3RR0R, Kill the Sleeper, Devil’s Guts, Aktivehate, Dolls of Pain, Gothika, Ambassador 21, BAK XIII, Kontrolled Demoliton, Zeitgeist Zero, Distorted World and En Esch. The song will be part of the new Vigilante album “Turning Point.” “It’s Our Time” is available on Nimbit and several other digital services.

All the money raised by this single will be donated to the FreeAnons Solidarity Network, which exists to provide legal, financial, and moral support for activists facing prosecution for involvement – alleged or otherwise – in Anonymous actions.

Buy and listen to the new single on Nimbit here:
http://www.nimbitmusic.com/vigilante
More info about Vigilante:
www.vigilante.cl
www.facebook.com/vigilanteband
www.soundcloud.com/vigilanteband
www.youtube.com/vigilanteband

 

Category Nimbit | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Sean Walker, Seattle audio engineer and boating enthusiast. He recently took his friends, and his StudioLive 16.4.2, for a spin out on Lake Washington during the city’s annual Seafair festival. Oh, and he also brought his band, and remotely mixed the band’s performance on the water while mixing via StudioLive Remote on his iPad. From a floating trampoline. Seriously. Pics follow.]

It’s August in Seattle, and that means two things: less rain than normal and our annual Seafair celebration! Seafair is a week-long celebration culminating on the first Sunday in August with the H1 Unlimited Hydroplane races and an air show over the race course on lake Washington! The race course is surrounded by a log boom on the outside perimeter to keep pleasure crafts from getting run over by a 200 MPH hydro. Now, being the festive sort, we often fill the log boom with boats and party like it’s Mardi Gras! This year, however, we outdid ourselves with the help of our friends at PreSonus, Audix, Sennheiser and QSC. This year, our client and I loaded a Yacht with a 6 Kilowatt generator, a PreSonus Studiolive 16.4.2, four QSC KW181 subs, four KW122 tops, and some K12s for monitors, and invited our friends in the fantastic cover band, The Herding Cats to THROW DOWN ON TOP OF THE YACHT!

Naturally, this presented a unique set of challenges. There were to be identical bow and stern PA rigs (you don’t want any survivors… I mean, anyone to miss the show), monitors for the band, and a wireless transmission to another yacht. So, we set up the speakers, ran power and signal, then ran a snake to the top of the vessel where the band would play as I mixed from inside the cabin. Thankfully for me, this was not my StudioLive’s first rodeo. Rather than the old guess-and-check method I’m used to when there is no proper FOH position, I got to relax on the floating trampoline behind the Yacht and mix the show, via StudioLive Remote on my iPad, iced tea in hand! If that isn’t a win, I don’t know what is! Also, the StudioLive’s ability to link Auxiliary sends to stereo made the wireless transmission to the other yacht a breeze!

The Microphones were all Sennheiser and Audix, except for an RE20 on the kick. Vocals all ran wirelessly. An E965 for Jon, who is the drummer/lead singer. E835’s were deployed for Mike and Rick’s backing vocals. Mike’s Fender Twin amp was miked with an E609 in the standard “Yeah, that’s just right” spot where the dust cap meets the cone. A DI was used for Rick’s bass to keep things “simple.” Since Jon thinks he’s some kind of Bonham, and drenches his drums with pitchers of water for an AWESOME spectacle during the bands Led Zeppelin melody, durable is the name of the game here. Snare and toms were Audix F-series with a Sennheiser E901 plate in the kick and an RE20 for kick out.

The day went off without a hitch and the band sounded fantastic! Most importantly, we had fun and that’s what this game is all about!

A HUGE thank you to Presonus, Sennheiser, Audix and QSC for making fantastic gear in both function and sound. We could not have pulled this off nearly as easily without their help!

The Herding Cats are Jon Bolton, Mike Mattingly and Rick Lovrovich. If you find yourself in the Seattle area, you owe it to yourself to catch them in action!

Sean Walker is a Freelance Audio Engineer in the Seattle area.

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Further cementing their long-standing reputation as stewards of quality in pro audio journalism, Tape Op recently ran a flattering review of our Eris Monitors, which, coincidentally enough, are now in stores. Doublethanks to Eli Crews for the kind words.

A few of those words follow: “I found both of these monitor models very useful tools for the imperfect art of home-studio mixing… if you were to put them up in a very controlled environment, next to speakers you paid a bunch of money for, you would probably find things here and there about them you didn’t like – although you may be surprised. Setting them up in my humble (yet effective) home studio for a few months helped me hear things I wasn’t hearing previously and helped me to provide better mixes for my clients. At the end of the day, that matters much more than the price tag of the speaker or the label on the front. Job well done, PreSonus.” Click here to read the full review: http://tapeop.com/reviews/gear/96/eris-e5-active-studio-monitor/

Category Studio Monitors | 0 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Parents are always proud of their children, even the ones who have ornery rugrats who mark up the walls with crayon. We treat pro audio product development a lot like parenthood. Our gear is shaped by our experiences, and  we instill in our offspring  the virtues we hold dearest. It’s a labor of love. And of course, the fateful day must arrive when a product matures, is all grown up, and is released into the world—hopefully to live out the values shaped by our guiding, if solder-burned, hands.

However, that’s pretty much where the similarities end. If you ask a parent who their favorite child is, the universal standard answer is that the parent in question loves all their children the same.

Not so with us. The ADL 700 Tube Channel Strip is far and away our best, most favorite child, and now that it’s graduated from LSU and made it’s way into the world, it has started to reap the recognition we—and plenty of others—feel it deserves.

Some gems follow. Click the publication names to link to the full review, where available.

  • “ADL 700 features performance that approaches the best of the best, though at half to two-thirds the cost of the competition… Vocalists seem to love it, citing clarity, presence and even preference over my usual premium signal chain—generally Chandler Limited, Manley Labs, and Neve components.”
    -Pro Audio Review, Feb. 2013
  • “This is a terrific tool, worthy of consideration by seasoned professionals.”
    -Resolution, March 2013
  • “…an incredibly adaptable mic preamp—one that you could use on anything. I’d love to have for or five of ‘em.”
    -Tape Op, Jan/Feb 2013

The ADL 700 is available via our Signature Dealers. Click here for a list of where to find the ADL 700 in the USA. If you live outside the USA, please contact the official PreSonus distributor in your area to find out where you can hear/obtain the ADL 700 for yourself. You can find your region’s distributor by clicking here.

Here are some artist opinions on the ADL 700. We’re flattered!

  • “ADL 700 is an INCREDIBLE mic pre!! Next level of anything I’ve ever used—very quiet and warm sounding. I’ve only had GREAT results!!”
    -Teddy Riley, Producer (Micheal Jackson, Bobby Brown, Usher)
  • “The ADL 700 makes acoustic guitars sound smooth and sweet and vocals are big and clean.”
    -Keb’ Mo, three-time Grammy-winning singer-songwriter
  • “…gives the artist warmth and a lot of body. The ADL 700 gives me everything I need and has become my new favorite preamp.”
    -Nick Cooper, vocal instructor, (Beyoncé, Katy Perry, Nicki Minaj)
  • “The ADL 700 is a serious and versatile channel strip with a smooth compressor and impressive EQ. Perfect for our basses, vocals,and anything else we plug into it. We love it!”
    -Bass Monsters Victor Wooten and Steve Bailey

Category ADL 700 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Pro Audio DVDs! They are offering some great resources for learning the ins and outs of the StudioLive consoles, as well as live sound in general These tips come from David Wills, voice of experience and all-around awesome guy. He’s offering BOTH a free online curriculum as well as a three-DVD package. Details follow]

FREE Church Sound Training!

Our friends over at ProAudioDVDs.com have a brand new FREE training series targeted for Church Sound Teams.  If your sound team needs some help in running and troubleshooting how to run live sound, this free video course is a must.

Hosted by David Wills (Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, Phil Collins) this course heavily uses our StudioLive consoles so it’s a perfect way to master Live Sound.

Click here for more info: https://qi970.infusionsoft.com/go/free-ulss/presonus/

 

Ultimate Live Sound School 3 DVD set

Hosted by David Wills (Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, Phil Collins)

The most comprehensive Live Sound training on the planet featuring our StudioLive series.  Over 6 hours of hands on training going into every aspect of Live Sound from designing and running your own system to advanced troubleshooting.  Perfect for training Church Sound teams or anyone interested in nailing down Live Sound forever.

 

Category Uncategorized | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



 

An interesting bit of recording industry foreshadowing, discovered in a thrift store by our own Carl Jacobson!

This pic is snapped from the back of 1963’s “Dave Brubeck Live at Carnegie Hall.” Tape splicing to edit a performance may seem downright quaint by today’s standards, but this raises a great discussion.

What would Teo Macero say about today’s editing practices in music?

And when it comes to editing a performance, where do you draw the line—if at all? What will you NOT do?

Category Just for Fun | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



FREE LIVE WEBCAST!

PreSonus LIVE Airs Today! 2 p.m. CST / 3 p.m. EST / Noon PST / 19:00 GMT

http://www.presonus.com/videos/presonuslive

Join PreSonus Technology Evangelist Justin Spence as he takes you on a guided tour of the StudioLive 16.0.2!

The 16.0.2 packs a lot of mixing power into a very portable package. Tune in to learn some of its innermost secrets.

Category StudioLive 16.0.2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Ain’t no party like a Craig Wood party

[This just in from DJ Craig Wood, thorough wordsmith and PreSonus advocate. He recently got a FaderPort, and apparently it has changed his life. I recommend going to the kitchen for a minute and making a sandwhich, as in the Twitter-era, this is War and Peace. Not to mean it’s long. I mean it’s a literary classic!]
Hey PreSonus! Below you’ll find my review of the omnipotent controller that is the PreSonus FaderPort. Feel free to publish, post, tattoo, etc!
Having spent several years working “in the box” with Apple Logic 9, my production partner began to view it as a bit of stagnant piece of software in terms of both its functionality as well as its ability to get our creative juices flowing. We decided to jump ship to PreSonus Studio One after having been told by many of our colleagues that we’d be in for a treat. To sweeten the deal, the timing of our new purchase coincided with a PreSonus promotion offering a FREE FaderPort. After spending many hours over the course of a week with this baby, I’m wondering how I could ever live without it.
After many years of hands-on time playing guitar and DJing, there’s nothing I appreciate more than being able to incorporate a bit of tactile response within my little basement studio setup. There’s something refreshing about being able to press the keys of my MIDI keyboard, hit the pads on my Maschine MK2 or turn the knobs of my beloved Virus B module. PreSonus’ FaderPort has certainly found a spot in my “Hall of Things to Touch in a Non-Creepy Way.”
Installation
What installation? Seriously. I simply connected the USB and AC power and I was running! I couldn’t get any easier than this. In the interest of full disclosure, I didn’t try FaderPort with my other DAWs, Ableton Live 9 and Logic 9/10… and why would I? Studio One is the sh*t! But I digress.
On the Surface
The controller itself is easy enough to figure out, and comes with the essentials which I will conveniently breakdown in bullet-point fashion to prevent a wall of text from forming:

  • A touch-sensitive, silky-smooth motor-controlled (YES, motor-controlled!) fader that makes about as much noise as rubbing your hands together (you’re doing that right now, aren’t you?).
  • The standard array of transport/channel buttons (Play, Mute, Solo, etc.) in addition to a bonus “User” button to define your own actions and a “Shift” button to obtain secondary functionality with the transport buttons.
  • A row of buttons dedicated to quickly access different window views (goodbye “F” keys!).
  • A row of buttons dedicated to navigating the tracks of your mixer…that consequently results in your motorized fader adjusting to match the volume of the respective track. In other words, less screen starting and more fader moving!
  • An “endless” pot control for the respective track channel’s balance.
In Practice
Let me make this perfectly clear: if you own Studio One, you need to own FaderPort. Personally, I like to work fast when inspiration strikes. Being able to keep one hand on my trackpad with the other hand on FaderPort has me working at speeds that would make the Flash bow his head in shame. The ability to quickly access interface windows and physically adjust the volume on any given track is an incredible time-saver. The buttons have a satisfying”click” to them.
Parting Words
While reading this review you may feel as though my tone is a bit shill. I assure you I’m no salesman, just an excited music maker who has taken a strong liking to a simplistically brilliant piece of hardware that works straight out of the box. By eliminating the need to constantly hunt for keyboard shortcuts, I can apply that time saved to the one thing every producer–no matter how famous–strives for: more opportunity to be creative.
About the Guy Who Wrote This
Craig Wood is a nerd who has surrounded himself with technology and music throughout his 32 years on this Earth. He’s one half of the EDM production group that goes by Stepchild. (Shill: Debut EP available on Heavy Artillery Recordings!) He enjoys heavy basslines, drop-kicking mannequins, and writing review bios in the third person. He will not rest until he unleashes his revenge against the six-fingered man.

Category FaderPort | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Sonic Sense Pro Audio just posted this first-look (first-listen?) video of the Sceptre S8 CoActual monitors. They compared the Sceptre S8 ($749, each) to the much more expensive Genelec 8050A ($2195, each) and the Adam A7x ($699, each) monitors. All monitors involved in the shootout were cautiously miked and measured, and detailed frequency response and phase charts are presented for each.

Sonic Sense is very thorough, which I suppose makes for the “Sense” part of “Sonic Sense.”

Click through to the Sonic Sense blog post here to get their full review, but in the meantime here’s a snippet:
“As promised, the sound quality truly does stand up well beside high-end monitors that have become “household” names in the studio world including ADAM, Genelec, JBL, and Neumann.”

 

Category Studio Monitors | 2 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard