PreSonus Blog

Rob Seifert Gage Sounds off on PreSonus

April 2,2013

[This just in from Rob Seifert Gage, producer/engineer and owner of Audio Evidence Mobile.]

As an independent engineer/producer since the pre-DAW era, I had the opportunity to see the development of the modern-day DAWs. Some had all the bells and whistles but sounded terrible. I have learned so many through the sessions I’ve worked, and I am so excited about PreSonus Studio One 2.5 ! The sound of 64-bit processing and the extensive native plugins  put a smile on my analog face every at session.

Every project on my Audio Evidence Mobile studio is different day by day.  As a producer and as a live sound engineer, I work with singer-songwriters and full bands. I archive every show and edit each performance into stems for the client. Studio One has made the process so fast and easy. I use the F keyboard command to separate at cursor, and I can move so quickly to the end of the performance that I can sell CDs within minutes at the end of a show. In other DAWs it took a few bounces to disk to get the same task done. One great thing about PreSonus is that when I first downloaded Studio One version 1.0, this feature was not included—but PreSonus is hip to what is needed and with each update they give us what we need!
As an engineer, I love the sound. My studio is a hybrid analog/digital space allowing me the use of my outboard gear using Pipeline Stereo in Studio One. All my effects are outboard, and my main outs are going into either a

Requisite Audio Y7, or a Universal Audio 2-610 if I need EQ. Then I combine into and monitor through a Dangerous Music D-Box, which is a great tool, but Studio One is doing most of the work.
I use samples and tempo mapping a lot in my work, and in Studio One it’s so easy. It allows the programmer to create tracks that sound like a supercomputer tempo or a human—and combining the two does the trick for me!
PreSonus Studio One is fast, fun, and simply the only DAW for me.

 

Category Studio One | 32 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard