PreSonus Blog

Unsung-Heroes

Category Uncategorized | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[UPDATE: Here's a handy PDF of all the ADL 700 dealers. You're welcome!]

 

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No compromises. This is, hands-down, our finest tube preamp to date. And while we hope you believe us, fact is that “must be heard to be believed” really is true. So, we’d like you to check out the following video starring PreSonus Artist Briana Tyson her cadre of usual suspects from around the PreSonus office. This video, a very special episode of PreSonus LIVE, feature the entire band running through ADL 600 and ADL 700 preamps. Guitars, keys, bass, overheads—everything.

We recognize that YouTube’s streaming audio quality is going to be a bottleneck here, so we are encouraging those interested in the ADL 700 Channel Strip to find one at their nearby US PreSonus dealer. We’ve arranged an elite team of dealers who have agreed to set up in-store demo units of the ADL 700 so you can pop in and experience it for yourself. They are:

Arizona:

Pure Wave Audio
Tucson
248 W. Elm St, 85705
(520) 622-3895
www.purewaveaudio.com

 

California:

Westlake Audio
North Hollywood
4101 Lankershim Blvd.
(323) 845-1145
www.westlakepro.com

GC Pro
Sherman Oaks
14209 Ventura Blvd.
(818) 990-8332
www.guitarcenter.com

GC Pro
West LA
10831 West Pico Blvd.
(310) 475-0637
www.guitarcenter.com

GC Pro
Hollywood
7425 Sunset Blvd.
(323) 874-1060
www.guitarcenter.com

 

Colorado:

Sonic Sense Denver
1500 West Hampden ­Avenue, Suite 3H
(303) 753-0201
www.sonicsense.com

Sweetwave Audio
Louisville
1795 Plaza Drive
(303) 258-0563
www.sweetwaveaudio.com

 

Florida:

GC Pro
Hallandale
1101 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
(954) 456-7890
www.guitarcenter.com

Sam Ash Tampa
Tampa
7726 Cheri Ct.
(813) 888-7876
www.samash.com

Sam Ash Miami Lakes
Miami Lakes
5360 NW 167th St.
(305) 628-3510
www.samash.com

 

Georgia

GC Pro
Atlanta
1485 Northeast Expy
(404) 320-7253
www.guitarcenter.com

 

Illinois

GC Pro
Central Chicago
2633 North Halsted
(773) 248-2808
www.guitarcenter.com

 

Indiana

Sweetwater
Fort Wayne
5501 U.S. Hwy 30 W
(800) 222-4700
www.sweetwater.com

 

Massachusetts

GC Pro
Boston
1255 Boylston St.
(617) 247-1389
www.guitarcenter.com

 

Maryland:

Washington Music Center
Wheaton
11151 Veirs Mill Road
(301) 946-8808
www.chucklevins.com

 

Minnesota:

Swift Music
Saint Paul
771 Raymond Ave
(651) 330-4738
www.swiftmusic.net

Missouri

Springfield
Audio Acoustics, Inc.
800 N. Cedarbrook
(417)869-0770
www.proaudiosuperstore.com
 

New York:

Alto Music
Middletown
180 Carpenter Ave
845.692.6922
www.altomusic.com

B&H Photo and Video
New York
420 9th Ave. at 34th St.
(800) 606-6969
www.bhphotovideo.com

Dale Pro Audio
New York
22 W 19th St
(888) 462-7828
www.daleproaudio.com

GC Pro
Manhattan
25 W. 14th Street
(212) 463-7500
www.guitarcenter.com

Sam Ash Carle Place
Carle Place
385 Old Country Rd
(516) 333-8700
www.samash.com

Sam Ash Manhattan
New York City
333 West 34th
212) 719-2299
www.samash.com

 

North Carolina:

Sam Ash Charlotte
Charlotte
5533 Westpark Drive
(704) 522-9253
www.samash.com

 

Tennessee:

GC Pro
Nashville
721 Thompson Lane
(615) 297-7770
www.guitarcenter.com

Sam Ash Nashville
Madison
1647 Gallatin Pike North
(615) 860-7475
www.samash.com

 

Texas:

Rock & Roll Rentals
Austin
1420 W Oltorf
(512) 447-5305
www.rocknrollrentals.com

Sam Ash San Antonio
San Antonio
25 NE Loop 410 at ­McCullough
(210) 530-9777
www.samash.com

GC Pro
Dallas
814 N Central Expy
(214) 692-9999
www.guitarcenter.com

 

Wisconsin:

Full Compass Madison
9770 Silicon Prairie
Parkway
(800) 356-5844
www.fullcompass.com

 

Quebec:

Studio Economik
215 St-Augustin
Montreal, Quebec
Canada, H4C2N7
(514)-937-2000
www.economik.com

 

 

 

Online Only:

American Musical Supply
(800) 458-4076
www.americanmusical.com/PreSonus

Musician’s Friend
800-449-9128
www.musiciansfriend.com

Sound Pure
(888) 528-9703
www.soundpure.com

Vintage King
(888) 653-1184 ext 3
www.vintageking.com

 

 

Category Artist | 4 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Fluff

[This just in from Fluff, AKA GuitaristFacts, who has an absolutely KILLER YouTube channel full of heavy metal riffage, gear demos, facial hair, and all the endeavors where the three coincide. He produces his videos as skillfully as produces his music, and he's chosen some PreSonus gear to help him along the way. He was kind enough to share a few paragraphs about his recording tricks and experiences with PreSonus gear.]

Hello, my name is Ryan, but my friends call me “Fluff.” I make guitar-related gear demos on YouTube in my home studio for companies all over the world. Pickups, speakers, guitars, pedals, microphones, you name it. I also produce the occasional record and re-amp guitars for rock albums, and record about five days a week. For all of this work, I rely exclusively on couple of pieces PreSonus gear that I simply would be lost without.

I should probably mention that I try to capture every kind of guitar tone, from brutal to chiming. In order to produce a wide array of tones, I need an interface that offers flexible signal routing, low latency and high-quality instrument inputs, as well as low noise on the outputs. The PreSonus FireStudio Project is perfectly suited for all of these needs. Two instrument inputs, (I keep one set for guitar, one set for bass) loads of inputs and outputs and +48V power when needed to run my condenser microphone for when I do voice work. WIN!

I also use the PreSonus Studio Channel as my go-to mic preamp. The built-in EQ and compression make it extremely versatile for clean guitar tracks, vocals, huge distorted guitars, and bass cabinets. I am also a tube nut, and I find that replacing the stock tube (a high-gain tube with good midrange) with an inexpensive NOS 12AX7 JAN tube (usually about $30 on eBay) can really round off the harsh highs I sometimes experience while recording high-gain guitars, and fattens up my signal prior to going into my FireStudio Project.

When it comes time to record, I use a Heil PR30 about 90% of the time for guitars, as that mic has a very flat frequency response. Knowing this, I can get the microphone placed in the ballpark (usually around the area where the dust cap meets the speaker cone, on-axis) and then use the Studio Channel’s EQ to fine tune the highs and mids (I typically boost about 2dB in the 3K range with a medium Q) until I find a nice sonic pocket for the guitars to sit in the mix. If I want to add a bit of flavor, I will add a Shure SM57 plugged directly into the FireStudio Project and then bring the volume up on the SM57 to add some bite and ‘oomph’ for palm mutes on the distorted guitars.

As for the aforementioned re-amping, I plug straight into the FireStudio Project and adjust the input level so I am seeing an average -16dB, with peaks no louder than -12dB. This way I have some wiggle room when outputting the DI through my re-amping box (I use a Radial ProRMP), as sometimes I need a stronger signal to go over a long lead or something like that.

I am asked quite often which interface people should get when diving into home recording, and I always say PreSonus for two reasons: first, they have the computer driver experience that allows their products to work the first time, right out of them box, problem-free. Second, the customer service and support is outstanding. I found out first hand when I called about my 8-year-old FirePod interface and was treated like I was in The Rolling Stones.

Seriously, why can’t more companies operate this way?

-Fluff

Twitter

YouTube

 

 

 

Category Studio Channel | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Mauricio Yáñez Polloni, of our distributor partner, Croma Limitada.]

The guy at the StudioLives in these pictures is Mauricio Romero, my friend, who has lived for 10 years on Rapa Nui! He did all the audio production for the Tapati, an annual festival that lasts for 10 days! Tapati was first performed during the first ten days of February, 1975. The festival began as a one among islanders, but now is an instance to share culture with tourists visiting around that time of year.

Two linked StudioLive 16.4.2s were the heart of the sound of this important event, running the live sound and recording the bands simultaneously. The show was recorded in Capture and then edited, mixed, and mastered in Studio One 2.5.

Mauricio Romero is the founder of the most important sound company of the island, Matau Producciones. He also has produced many albums with ethnic music of Rapa Nui.

This year, Matau Producciones did all sound and lighting for Tapati as well. Saludos!

Category StudioLive 16.4.2 | 6 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Tone from Live at the Loft, an amazing music video production cleverly disguised as a music venue. All shows are invite-only, free, recorded by a StudioLive 24.4.2, and filmed by a really nice camera. As a result, their website is rife with high-quality live performance footage from about a zillion bands, and if you look close you'll spot a StudioLive in some of them! Tone gave us a little more info about his recording rig for The Loft. It follows.]
We’ve got a  50′ 16 channel XLR stage snake connected right to the StudioLive 24.4.2.  The stage snake also connects our stage monitors from the AUX outs of the board. The StudioLive is connected to an i7 Mac Laptop running Capture. We record the DJ sets and live performances through the console and Capture, which usually run about 4 or 5 hours in total.  From there, I export the stems from Capture, zip them and upload to WeTransfer for download by our audio engineer in California.
The main reason the StudioLive 24.4.2 kicks butt for us is its ability to control the house mix separately of the mix to disk. That, and its rock-solid reliability, and that it records 24 tracks over FireWire.

 

Category StudioLive 24.4.2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Hey! If you missed this incredible presentation, it’s no big deal. Because you can see it on YouTube. Or heck, just click that familiar little triangle-shaped “Play” button below.

We flew Briana in to Baton Rouge, assembled a killer band, and had them track a few songs using Rick’s monster rack of ADL 600 and ADL 700 preamps—because we can. EVERY channel of audio in this production was run through the ADLs.  How do you think it sounds?

Category PreSonus LIVE | 3 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Riker

[This just in from three-time Grammy winning Producer/Engineer Warren "WAR" Riker! He's using using two ADL 700's on Anders Osborne's latest recording at Dockside Studio in Maurice, LA. He says...]

“Damn, these sound awesome on acoustic guitars! Can’t wait to start recording vocals!”

Warren working hard at Dockside, but we have more to come on this story in the coming weeks as production on this record continues. Stay tuned!

 

Category Artist | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



Our friends at Sweetwater spent some time at our NAMM booth getting details on the StudioLive 32.4.2AI from Rodney, our European Product Marketing Manager and technocrat. Big thanks to both!



Category StudioLive 32.4.2AI | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Mike Dawson, Engineer/Voice/Producer on The Adam Carolla Show!]

Hey PreSonus!

I wanted to share a bit about our use of the StudioLive 24.4.2 on our broadcast. It’s awesome to have all the built-in effects. I never know what’s going to happen at any given moment on the Adam Carolla Show. Debbie Gibson was a guest on our show during  her and Adam’s run on Celebrity Apprentice together.  She started singing “Billy, Don’t be a Hero,” by Bo Donaldson. I immediately mixed her mic into the reverb I’ve selected for solo vocal performances (always impromptu!)  and she sounded pretty bitchin’.  She looked at me through the glass and winked, saying something like “Hey, you’ve got an engineer that knows what he’s doing.” Adam joined in the song, and with the touch of a button they have perfect studio quality reverb on vocals. After the show, Debbie Gibson hugged me.

Most recently, David Alan Grier was doing a hilariously dirty Teddy Pendergrast impression. Again, in milliseconds, reverb is up and easily engaged and disengaged without having to fumble through auxiliaries and faders. This is a bad-ass piece of machinery. I use it in my own production studio, and even travel with it for on-site recording and engineering gigs.

The StudioLive console is so easy to set up for impromptu live performances in the studio. In the past few months, I’ve engineered and mixed live performances by Barry Zito and Kelley James, Susanna Hoffs and Hoobastank, and they all sounded like they were supposed to.

Damn good.

 

Category StudioLive 24.4.2 | 1 Comment »
Posted by Ryan Roullard



[This just in from Ghostfeeder, electro-rockers and FireBox enthusiasts from Rochester, NY.]59779_564662676885117_1231343093_n

For three years strong, my PreSonus FireBox has been a companion for Ghostfeeder on the stage as well as in the studio, and not once have we experienced artistic differences. The ‘Box is an undeniable asset when it comes to simplicity. When I was initially getting into recording for Ghostfeeder, I was a bit apprehensive about the amount of gear and technological know-how that seemed necessary to properly equip Ghostfeeder for self-sufficient recording. The fact that I literally just had to plug in the FireBox in to my computer in order to get great sound right off the bat pretty much squashed that apprehension. I was able to leave the diagnostics and troubleshooting to the online message boards catering to those who bought products made by the competition. As a result, every guitar, bass and vocal on every Ghostfeeder release has been recorded through the Firebox.

My preference for simplicity extends beyond the studio and into performance gear as well. My FireBox can push sound just as smoothly as it accepts it. It is an indispensable part of Ghostfeeder’s live presentation, pushing enough juice behind our backing tracks to fill any sound system without a hiccup, all while feeding our drummer a custom mix to his headphones. We house the Firebox in a custom-built tripod rack. It allows us to have our FireBox, our DMX light controller and our laptop all mounted onto one module for easily moving all of our technology onto and off of the stage with little fuss. The PreSonus Firebox is the unofficial fifth member of GhostFeeder.

ReverbNation
SoundCloud
Facebook
Youtube

Category Artist | 25 Comments »
Posted by Ryan Roullard